Retired 4-Star General Stanley McChrystal says he wouldn't work for 'shady' Donald Trump

Looks like retired Army Gen. Stanley McChrystal won’t be joining the ever-evolving roster of Trump administration officials anytime soon.

The former top commander of U.S. and international forces in Afghanistan said during an interview that aired Sunday on ABC’s “This Week” that he would reject an offer to work for President Donald Trump if asked.

“It’s important for me to work for people who I think are basically honest, who tell the truth as best they know it,” McChrystal said. He suggested that the president has been, at times, “openly disingenuous on things.”

“The military talks about ... if you’re put into a difficult military situation would that leader sacrifice himself, put himself and others at risk to come for you,” he continued. “I have to believe that the people I’m working for would do that, whether we disagree on a lot of other things. I’m not convinced from the behavior that I’ve seen that that’s the case here.”

Asked if he believes Trump is “immoral,” McChrystal said yes.

“I don’t think he tells the truth,” he told ABC. “What I would ask every American to do is ... stand in front of that mirror and say, ‘What are we about? Am I really willing to throw away or ignore some of the things that people do that are pretty unacceptable normally just because they accomplish certain other things that we might like?’”

“If we want to be governed by someone we wouldn’t do a business deal with because ... their background is so shady, if we’re willing to do that, then that’s in conflict with who I think we are,” he added. “And so I think it’s necessary at those times to take a stand.”

RELATED: President Trump with members of the military

14 PHOTOS
President Trump with members of the military
See Gallery
President Trump with members of the military
U.S. President Donald Trump is saluted by a military official as he departs from the capitol for the inaugural parade after his swearing in at the Capitol in Washington, U.S., January 20, 2017. REUTERS/Mike Segar
U.S. President-elect Donald Trump gestures to the crowd as he stands with U.S. Army personnel as he watches the Army vs Navy college football game at M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore, Maryland, December 10, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar
U.S. President Donald Trump awards the Medal of Honor to James McCloughan, who served in the U.S. Army during the Vietnam War, during a ceremony at the White House in Washington, U.S. July 31, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
U.S. President Donald Trump attends a lunch with members of the U.S. military during a visit at the U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM) and Special Operations Command (SOCOM) headquarters in Tampa, Florida, U.S., February 6, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
U.S. President Donald Trump poses for a photo with Army Sgt First Class Alvaro Barrientos, his wife Tammy and First Lady Melania Trump (R) after awarding him a Purple Heart at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, U.S., April 22, 2017. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
U.S. President Donald Trump attends a lunch with members of the U.S. military during a visit at the U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM) and Special Operations Command (SOCOM) headquarters in Tampa, Florida, U.S., February 6, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 20: U.S. President Donald Trump salutes a U.S. Marine before boarding Marine One while departing from the White House, on March 20, 2017 in Washington, DC. President Trump is traveling to Louisville Kentucky to speak at a Make America Great Rally. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
U.S. President Donald Trump shakes hands with military personnel as he arrives at Harrisburg international airport, before attending a rally marking his first 100 days in office in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, U.S. April 29, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
U.S. President Donald Trump attends a lunch with members of the U.S. military during a visit at the U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM) and Special Operations Command (SOCOM) headquarters in Tampa, Florida, U.S., February 6, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
U.S. President Donald Trump gestures as he speaks to U.S. military personnel at Naval Air Station Sigonella following the G7 Summit, in Sigonella, Italy, May 27, 2017. REUTERS/Darrin Zammit Lupi
U.S. President Donald Trump delivers remarks to military personnel and families at Joint Base Andrews in Maryland, U.S., September 15, 2017. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
U.S. President Donald Trump greets members of the U.S. military as he prepares to board Air Force One, to survey hurricane damage, at Muniz Air National Guard Base in Carolina, Puerto Rico, October 3, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. President Donald Trump returns a salute as he steps from Marine One to board Air Force One in Morristown, New Jersey, U.S., on his way back to Washington August 20, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Donald Trump salutes as he arrives at Newark International airport in Newark, NJ U.S., to spend a weekend at Trump National Golf Club in Bedminister, New Jersey, June 9, 2017. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

McChrystal led the Joint Special Operations Command in the mid-2000s under President George W. Bush. He served as commander of the International Security Assistance force for just over a year under President Barack Obama before resigning in June 2010, a day after Rolling Stone published an article online in which McChrystal and his staff mocked Vice President Joe Biden and criticized Obama’s leadership.

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.