Canseco uses baseball milestone to justify presidential bid and it might actually make sense

Jose Canseco’s political aspirations know no bounds. According to his most recent social media activity, even the office of President of the United States is in his sights.

When last we left you, the former Oakland Athletics star was eyeing the position of president Donald Trump’s chief of staff. His offer to help his “little buddy” came in the aftermath of John Kelly announcing his decision to step down as chief of staff in February, and Trump’s top choice to replace Kelly, Nick Ayers, turning the job down.

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Now, after an overwhelming groundswell of eye rolls and “sure thing, Jose’s,” Canseco is seemingly upgrading his political aspirations to the United States’ highest office. Yes, he actually mentioned the possibility of running for president, and he’s even using his own baseball history to justify his bid.

 

Granted, the Cuban-born Canseco would have to challenge the natural-born citizen requirement that’s not completely defined by the Constitution. That’s a pretty big deal. But looking beyond the law, this might not be as crazy as it sounds.

Or maybe it’s just the right amount of crazy.

He’s not wrong about one thing

Canseco does make one valid point in there.

 

The answer is four 40-40 seasons.

That’s it. In the entire history of MLB, only four players have hit 40 home runs and stolen 40 bases in one season.

Canseco posted the very first 40-40 season back in 1988, which is the same year George H.W. Bush was elected president. Since then, Barry Bonds (1996), Alex Rodriguez (1998) and Alfonso Soriano (2006) have added their names to that exclusive list.

During that same time period, the United States has elected four different presidents. So even the smallest sample sizes suggests you’re more likely to be voted president than post a 40-40-season. And that’s not even taking into the account the 40-40 seasons that may or may not have been chemically aided.

Should Jose Canseco run for president?

That is the question he asked after all. And yes, some fans are already on board.

 

Having a slogan built in to your name doesn’t hurt either.

Beyond that, I don’t think we’re ready for a Jose Canseco administration just yet. Some would say the election of 2016 lowered the bar enough for any person to become president. I say patience is a virtue, and by 2024 the bar might just be low enough for Canseco to see over it comfortably.

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OAKLAND, CA - JULY 19: Jose Canseco #33 of the 1989 Oakland A's joins his teammates as they celebrate their World Series championship 25 years ago, before a game against the Baltimore Orioles at O.co Coliseum on July 19, 2014 in Oakland, California. (Photo by Brian Bahr/Getty Images)
OAKLAND, CA - JULY 19: Jose Canseco #33 of the 1989 Oakland A's celebrates their World Series championship 25 years ago, before a game against the Baltimore Orioles at O.co Coliseum on July 19, 2014 in Oakland, California. (Photo by Brad Mangin/MLB Photos via Getty Images)
OAKLAND, CA - JULY 19: Jose Canseco #33 of the 1989 Oakland A's celebrates their World Series championship 25 years ago, before a game against the Baltimore Orioles at O.co Coliseum on July 19, 2014 in Oakland, California. (Photo by Brad Mangin/MLB Photos via Getty Images)
OAKLAND, CA - JULY 19: Jose Canseco #33 gets a pat on the back from Tony Phillips #18 of the 1989 Oakland A's as they celebrate their World Series championship 25 years ago, before a game against the Baltimore Orioles at O.co Coliseum on July 19, 2014 in Oakland, California. (Photo by Brian Bahr/Getty Images)
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