Deaths of police officers on duty on the rise in the U.S.

WASHINGTON (AP) — More police officers have died in the line of duty this year in the United States than in 2017, according to data released Thursday.

The National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund said in a report that 144 federal, state and local officers have died so far in 2018. That figure represents roughly a 12 percent increase from the 129 who died in 2017.

The majority of the officers who died were shot or fatally injured in car crashes. Other deaths involved heart attacks, drownings and cancer and other illnesses developed by responders to the World Trade Center attack.

Eight of the officers were killed during investigative activity and six were killed while responding to calls of a domestic disturbance, according to the report. Two were killed while serving warrants, two died while handling or transporting prisoners and two others were inadvertently shot by other officers.

The officers who died in 2018 include a sheriff's deputy in Sacramento County, California, killed in a shootout, and a Greensboro, North Carolina, police officer killed in a car crash while responding to a call for a robbery in progress.

RELATED: National Police Week 2018

18 PHOTOS
National Police Week 2018
See Gallery
National Police Week 2018
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 13: Law enforcement officers hold candles during a candlelight vigil marking National Police Week on May 13, 2018 in Washington, D.C. (Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)
U.S. President Donald Trump hugs Adrianna Valoy, the mother of slain New York City police Detective Miosotis Familia, during the 37th Annual National Peace Officers? Memorial Service at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S., May 15, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
UNITED STATES - MAY 14: Members of the Boca Raton Police Department wait to participate in a competition near the Capitol Reflecting Pool that was part of National Police Week on May 14, 2018. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
A police officer from Arizona salutes at the 37th Annual National Peace Officers? Memorial Service at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S., May 15, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 13: Law enforcement officers hold candles during a candlelight vigil marking National Police Week on May 13, 2018 in Washington, D.C. (Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - MAY 14: From left, Drum Major Ken Misch, Drum Sgt. Charlie Ezelle, Roberto 'Boom Boom' Lopez, and Sgt. Michael Apodaca, of the Los Angeles Police Emerald Society Pipes and Drums, smoke cigars near the Capitol Reflection Pool after participating in a competition that was part of National Police Week on May 14, 2018. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 13: Law enforcement officers hold candles during a candlelight vigil marking National Police Week on May 13, 2018 in Washington, D.C. (Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 13: U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions delivers remarks during a candlelight vigil marking National Police Week on May 13, 2018 in Washington, D.C. (Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 13: Law enforcement officers, family members and other guests hold candles during a candlelight vigil marking National Police Week on May 13, 2018 in Washington, D.C. (Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 13: Members of the United States Park Police Honor Guard are pictured during a candlelight vigil marking National Police Week on May 13, 2018 in Washington, D.C. (Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 13: The U.S. Capitol Building is pictured during a candlelight vigil marking National Police Week on May 13, 2018 in Washington, D.C. (Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)
U.S. President Donald Trump gives remarks at the 37th Annual National Peace Officers? Memorial Service at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S., May 15, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 13: Law enforcement officers, family members, and other guests hold candles during a candlelight vigil marking National Police Week on May 13, 2018 in Washington, D.C. (Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 01: Cardinal Donald Wuerl, the Archbishop of Washington, greets police officers ourside St. Patrick's Catholic Church prior to the 24th annual 'Blue Mass' May 1, 2018 in Washington, DC. The annual mass is held at the beginning of National Police Week for those in law enforcement and fire safety, remembering those who have fallen, and supporting those who serve. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 01: Members of law enforcement take communion in St. Patrick's Catholic Church during the 24th annual 'Blue Mass' May 1, 2018 in Washington, DC. The annual mass is held at the beginning of National Police Week for those in law enforcement and fire safety, remembering those who have fallen, and supporting those who serve. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 01: Members of a law enforcement honor guard team march into St. Patrick's Catholic Church for the 24th annual 'Blue Mass' May 1, 2018 in Washington, DC. The annual mass is held at the beginning of National Police Week for those in law enforcement and fire safety, remembering those who have fallen, and supporting those who serve. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 01: U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions (2nd R), Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein (C) and FBI Director Christoper Wray (2nd L) attend the 24th annual 'Blue Mass' at St. Patrick's Catholic Church May 1, 2018 in Washington, DC. The annual mass is held at the beginning of National Police Week for those in law enforcement and fire safety, remembering those who have fallen, and supporting those who serve. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 13: A member of the U.S. Park Police Honor Guard salutes during a candlelight vigil marking National Police Week on May 13, 2018 in Washington, D.C. (Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.