Schumer and Pelosi chide Trump for triggering shutdown with 'temper tantrum'

Sens. Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) and Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) castigated President Donald Trump on Saturday for the federal government shutdown that kicked in at the stroke of midnight.

In a joint statement released overnight, both lawmakers pointed their fingers at the commander in chief for what they dubbed “the Trump Government Shutdown.”

“Republicans control the House, the Senate, and the White House,” they said. “But instead of honoring his responsibility to the American people, President Trump threw a temper tantrum and convinced House Republicans to push our nation into a destructive Trump Shutdown in the middle of the holiday season. President Trump has said more than 25 times that he wanted a shutdown and now he has gotten what he wanted.”

The senators argued that their party has made numerous attempts to avert the crisis, which was prompted in part by Trump’s demands for $5 billion in funding for the southern border wall, despite the fact that a partial barrier already exists. While a spending bill including that measure passed the GOP-led House, it was inevitably dead on arrival in the Senate.

Related: Congress tries to avert a partial shutdown

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Congress tries to avert a partial shutdown
The entrance to the office of Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, R-Wis., is decorated for the holidays as Congress tries to pass legislation that would avert a partial government shutdown, at the Capitol in Washington, Thursday, Dec. 20, 2018. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
The Capitol is seen under early morning skies in Washington, Thursday, Dec. 20, 2018. The Senate approved legislation to temporarily fund the government late last night, a key step toward averting a federal shutdown after President Donald Trump backed off his demand for money for a border wall with Mexico. The House is expected to vote before Friday's deadline, when funding for a portion of the government expires. Without resolution, more than 800,000 federal workers would face furloughs or be forced to work without pay, disrupting government operations days before Christmas. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
House Speaker Paul Ryan leaves the chamber as a revised spending bill is introduced that includes $5 billion demanded by President Donald Trump for a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border, as Congress tries to avert a partial shutdown, in Washington, Thursday, Dec. 20, 2018. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi of California, the speaker-designate for the new Congress, and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., leave after talking to reporters as a revised spending bill is introduced in the House that includes $5 billion demanded by President Donald Trump for a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border, as Congress tries to avert a partial shutdown, in Washington, Thursday, Dec. 20, 2018. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La., walks to the chamber as a revised spending bill is introduced that includes $5 billion demanded by President Donald Trump for a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border, as Congress tries to avert a partial shutdown, in Washington, Thursday, Dec. 20, 2018. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
House Speaker Paul Ryan walks to the chamber as a revised spending bill is introduced that includes $5 billion demanded by President Donald Trump for a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border, as Congress tries to avert a partial shutdown, in Washington, Thursday, Dec. 20, 2018. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., and House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi of California, the speaker-designate for the new Congress, arrive to talk to reporters as a revised spending bill is introduced in the House that includes $5 billion demanded by President Donald Trump for a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border, as Congress tries to avert a partial shutdown, in Washington, Thursday, Dec. 20, 2018. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C., chairman of the conservative House Freedom Caucus, heads into a House Republican strategy meeting as Congress tries to pass legislation that would avert a partial government shutdown, at the Capitol in Washington, Thursday, Dec. 20, 2018. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Reporters at the Capitol wait for Speaker Paul Ryan and House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., to return from the White House as Congress tries to pass legislation that would avert a partial government shutdown, at the Capitol in Washington, Thursday, Dec. 20, 2018. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La., is surrounded by reporters as he leaves the chamber as President Donald Trump and Congress bicker over terms for funding the government and his demand for a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border, pushing the government to the brink of a partial shutdown, in Washington, Thursday, Dec. 20, 2018. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., top, is met by reporters at the Capitol after he and Speaker Paul Ryan returned from the White House as Congress tries to pass legislation that would avert a partial government shutdown, at the Capitol in Washington, Thursday, Dec. 20, 2018. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, a Republican from California, speaks during a television interview at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Dec. 20, 2018. President Donald Trump insisted on funding a wall or other barrier along the southern U.S. border as tensions over a possible partial government shutdown intensified in the wake of the presidents refusal to sign a stopgap spending bill. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
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The problem, Schumer and Pelosi contended, was Trump’s unrealistic and unreasonable plans for a wall.

“Democrats have offered Republicans multiple proposals to keep the government open, including one that already passed the Senate unanimously, and all of which include funding for strong, sensible, and effective border security – not the president’s ineffective and expensive wall.”

In the event that the government is not up and running soon, the senators vowed to “swiftly pass legislation to re-open” it in January once the House flips to a Democratic majority.

  • This article originally appeared on HuffPost.
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