Dancing off-duty FBI agent who shot man at Denver club avoids jail time

An off-duty FBI agent who accidentally shot a man in a Denver nightclub in June has been spared jail time.

Agent Chase Bishop struck a plea deal to finagle a sentence of two years of probation after pleading guilty to third-degree assault on Friday, reported Westword.

“We believe that this agreement strikes an appropriate balance of seeking justice for the victim and ensuring that this type of incident does not happen again,” said Denver District Attorney Beth McCann.

Bishop, 30, inadvertently fired a shot at fellow Mile High Spirits and Distillery patron Tom Reddington while executing a backflip. The gun tumbled from his waistband holster and fired upon hitting the ground. Bishop then walked away from the scene with his hands up while Reddington writhes in pain from the bullet in his leg.

“My whole goal in life is to care, protect and serve people,” Bishop told a judge Friday. “I never expected the result of my actions to lead to something like this.”

Related: Ex-FBI agent John Connolly’s murder conviction overturned 

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Ex-FBI agent John Connolly's murder conviction overturned
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Ex-FBI agent John Connolly's murder conviction overturned
BOSTON - SEPTEMBER 20: Boston District 1. John Connolly Jr., FBI agent, points as he and another agent take Francesco 'Frankie' Angiulo to court. John Connolly was questioned regarding his association with Boston mob figures Stephen 'The Rifleman' Flemmi and James 'Whitey' Bulger. (Photo by Ted Dully/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
Assistant State Attorney Michael Von Samft points out Anthony Ciulla's photgraph on the Winter Hill Organization's family chart, during the trial of John Connolly in Miami, Florida, Wednesday, September 17, 2008. Connolly, a former FBI agent, is accused of helping the Boston mob murder Miami gambling executive John Callahan, in 1982. At the top of the chart, third from the left, is John Martorano, a former mob hitman who testified against Connolly. (Photo by Marice Cohn Band/Miami Herald/MCT via Getty Images)
Former FBI agent John Connolly, center, was found guilty on Thursday, November 6, 2008, by a jury in Miami, Florida, for helping the Boston mob murder Miami gambling executive John Callahan in 1982. Here Connolly listens to the judge while flanked by his attorneys Bruce Fleisher, left, and Manuel Casabielle. (Photo by Patrick Farrell/Miami Herald/MCT via Getty Images)
6-24-08 Al DIAZ / MIAMI HERALD STAFF -- Mob hitman John Martorano testifies against former FBI agent John J. Connolly during court hearing at Richard E. Gerstein Justice Building. Seen here is Connolly
6-24-08 Al DIAZ / MIAMI HERALD STAFF -- Mob hitman John Martorano testifies against former FBI agent John J. Connolly during court hearing at Richard E. Gerstein Justice Building. Seen here handcuffed is Connolly
BOSTON - SEPTEMBER 15: With his lawyer, Tracy Miner, on his side, former FBI agent John Connolly walks to Federal Court amongst the media. He was sentenced 10 years and one month in prison. (Photo by David L. Ryan/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
BOSTON - JUNE 28: Boston Deputy Supt. John Barry, in plainclothes, listens as Boston Detective Lt. Jerome McCallum speaks to reporters at a press conference outside the Blackfriars Pub, 105 Summer St., where the five massacred bodies had been found that morning. Interestingly, the FBI's Organized Crime Squad had been investigating Solmonte and the Blackfriars and among the investigators was now-disgraced FBI Agent John Connolly, presently serving time in Florida for his role as FBI informant to Bulger in the 1982 murder of John Callahan, a crooked business partner of Bulger's. (Photo by George Rizer/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
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Reddington, 24, who said he holds no grudge against Bishop, explained to the judge that he lost his job at an Amazon warehouse after the shooting. He claims he suffers from chronic pain and fears he may never be able to run again.

“I have done months of physical therapy,” said Reddington. “I have sought counseling; however, being in public, especially seeing law enforcement with guns, makes me uncomfortable.”

Despite the physical and emotional scars, Reddington does find some humor in the whole ordeal.

“I’ve done stupid things at bars to impress girls, too,” he quipped.

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