AP PHOTOS: Muslims worry about fate of relatives in China

ALMATY, Kazakhstan (AP) — The woman wipes at a tear as she talks about her daughter in China's Xinjiang region. Nurbakyt Kaliaskar, who lives in neighboring Kazakhstan, says her 25-year-old daughter is a college graduate who had a white-collar job. Then she got swept up in a Chinese crackdown on Muslims in Xinjiang.

The Muslims are taken to internment camps for re-education and, in some cases, for vocational training before being forced to work in factories, according to an analysis of satellite images and the accounts of former detainees and relatives interviewed by The Associated Press.

The government says the participants have signed agreements to be trained. Guard towers and barbed wire around the sprawling complexes that have sprung up in China's barren far west suggest the training isn't voluntary.

24 PHOTOS
Muslims worry about fate of relatives in China
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Muslims worry about fate of relatives in China
In this Dec. 8, 2018 photo, Mainur Medetbek cries as she speaks about her husband's detainment in a Chinese interment camp during an interview in a village near Almaty, Kazakhstan. Medetbek says her husband was detained over a year ago and was recently transferred to a factory, where he is required to live in dormitories six days a week. She says the ordeal has deprived her family of income and driven her to contemplate suicide many times. (AP Photo/ Dake Kang)
Rushan Abbas, 51, of Herndon, Va., holds a photo of her sister, Gulshan Abbas, Monday, Dec. 17, 2018, in Washington. Rushan Abbas, a Uighur in Washington, D.C., said her sister is among the many Uighurs detained. The sister, Dr. Gulshan Abbas was taken to what the government calls a vocational center, although she has no specific information on whether her sister is being forced to work. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
In this Dec. 9, 2018, photo, Orynbek Koksebek, a former detainee in a Chinese internment camp, holds up a phone showing a state television report about what Beijing calls "vocational training centers" for a photo in a restaurant in Almaty, Kazakhstan. Koksebek says that shortly before he was released from the camp in April, the camp's director strode into his class and told them they would soon be opening a new factory, and that detainees would be required to work and taught how to cook, sew, and repair cars. (AP Photo/ Dake Kang)
In this Dec. 9, 2018 photo, Kairat Samarkan, a former detainee in a Chinese internment camp, watches a state television report about what Beijing calls "vocational training centers" in a restaurant in Almaty in Kazakhstan. Samarkan calls state media portrayals of the camps "nonsense" and says there wasn't any kind of vocational training in his internment camp, only political classes that he called "brainwashing". (AP Photo/ Dake Kang)
In this Dec. 8, 2018 photo, Mainur Medetbek holds up a portrait of her detained husband at her home in a village outside Almaty, Kazakhstan. Medetbek says her husband was detained over a year ago in an internment camp and was recently transferred to a factory, where he is required to live in dormitories six days a week. She says the ordeal has deprived her family of income and driven her to contemplate suicide many times. (AP Photo/ Dake Kang)
In this Dec. 7, 2018, photo, Tursynbek Kuzhyrbek, a Chinese born immigrant to Kazakhstan and a cook, holds up a picture of his parents in a restaurant in Almaty, Kazakhstan. Kuzhyrbek says his father, an elderly retiree, was forced to work at a factory in China's far western Xinjiang region for four months, and only allowed to return home after Kuzhyrbek,'s mother injured her hand. (AP Photo/ Dake Kang)
In this Dec. 8, 2018, photo, Adilgazy Yergazy, a farmer, holds up pictures of his detained little brothers at his home in a village near Almaty, Kazakhstan. Yergazy says two of his little brothers were arrested and taken to internment camps last year, and that this year a factory opened in the camp where they were being held. He heard that his little brother's access to family is limited to a monthly face-to-face visit at the camp. (AP Photo/ Dake Kang)
In this Dec. 6, 2018, photo, Nurbakyt Kaliaskar, the wife of a sheep herder, holds up a picture of her daughter, Rezila Nulale, and her graduation certificate, at an office of an advocacy group for ethnic Kazakhs born in China in Almaty, Kazakhstan on December 6, 2018. Kaliaskar says her daughter, a college graduate who had a job in advertising, was detained in an internment camp in China's far western region of Xinjiang and is now being forced to make clothes for no pay. (AP Photo/Dake Kang)
In this photo taken Dec. 7, 2018, Mussa Imamadiuly, a truck driver, stands with a picture of his wife's little brother for a photo outside the office of an advocacy group for ethnic Kazakhs born in China in Almaty, Kazakhstan on Imamadiuly says shortly after his marriage, his new wife's little brother was arrested and taken to an internment camp. Last month, they heard through relatives still in China that police had notified them that his wife's little brother was about to be transferred to a factory. (AP Photo/ Dake Kang)
In this Dec. 7, 2018, photo, Sala Jimobai stands with her son, Aqzhol Dakey, holding a picture of her husband Dakey Zhunishan for a photo outside the office of an advocacy group for ethnic Kazakhs born in China in Almaty, Kazakhstan. Jimobai says her husband, a sheep herder, was detained in an internment camp in China's far western Xinjiang region, and later transferred to a factory in October for a month before being released. He is now confined to his brother's village in China. (AP Photo/ Dake Kang)
In this Dec. 6, 2018 photo, Nurbakyt Kaliaskar cries as she speaks about her daughter's detainment in a Chinese internment camp during an interview in Almaty, Kazakhstan. Kaliaskar, who lives in neighboring Kazakhstan, says her 25-year-old daughter is a college graduate who had a white-collar job. Then she got swept up in a Chinese crackdown on Muslims in Xinjiang. (AP Photo/ Dake Kang)
In this Dec. 6, 2018, photo, Omirbek Nurmukamet holds up a picture of him with his wife for a photo at the office of an advocacy group for ethnic Kazakhs born in China in Almaty, Kazakhstan. Nurmukamet says his wife was detained in an internment camp and was forced to work at a fabric factory in the camp starting in September. He says his wife was employed as a hairdresser before her detainment and says she doesn't need vocational training. (AP Photo/ Dake Kang)
In this Wednesday, Dec. 5, 2018, photo, residents pass by the entrance to the "Hotan City apparel employment training base" where Hetian Taida has a factory in Hotan in western China's Xinjiang region. This is one of a growing number of internment camps in the Xinjiang region, where by some estimates 1 million Muslims are detained, forced to give up their language and their religion and subject to political indoctrination. Now, the Chinese government is also forcing some detainees to work in manufacturing and food industries. Some of them are within the internment camps; others are privately owned, state-subsidized factories where detainees are sent once they are released. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
In this Dec. 3, 2018, photo, a child stands near a large screen showing photos of Chinese President Xi Jinping near a carpark in Kashgar in western China's Xinjiang region. Across the Xinjiang region, a growing number of internment camps have been built, where by some estimates 1 million Muslims are detained, forced to give up their language and their religion and subject to political indoctrination. Now, the Chinese government is also forcing some detainees to work in manufacturing and food industries. Some of them are within the internment camps; others are privately owned, state-subsidized factories where detainees are sent once they are released. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
In this Monday, Dec. 3, 2018, photo, a guard tower and barbed wire fences are seen around a facility in the Kunshan Industrial Park in Artux in western China's Xinjiang region. This is one of a growing number of internment camps in the Xinjiang region, where by some estimates 1 million Muslims are detained, forced to give up their language and their religion and subject to political indoctrination. Now, the Chinese government is also forcing some detainees to work in manufacturing and food industries. Some of them are within the internment camps; others are privately owned, state-subsidized factories where detainees are sent once they are released. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
In this Wednesday, Dec. 5, 2018, photo, two layers of barbed wire fencing ring the "Hotan City apparel employment training base" where Hetian Taida has a factory in Hotan in western China's Xinjiang region. This is one of a growing number of internment camps in the Xinjiang region, where by some estimates 1 million Muslims are detained, forced to give up their language and their religion and subject to political indoctrination. Now, the Chinese government is also forcing some detainees to work in manufacturing and food industries. Some of them are within the internment camps; others are privately owned, state-subsidized factories where detainees are sent once they are released. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
In this Monday, Dec. 3, 2018, photo, residents line up inside the Artux City Vocational Skills Education Training Service Center at the Kunshan Industrial Park in Artux in western China's Xinjiang region. Across the Xinjiang region, a growing number of internment camps have been built, where by some estimates 1 million Muslims are detained, forced to give up their language and their religion and subject to political indoctrination. Now, the Chinese government is also forcing some detainees to work in manufacturing and food industries. Some of them are within the internment camps; others are privately owned, state-subsidized factories where detainees are sent once they are released. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
CORRECTS TO SAY MANUFACTURING AND FOOD INDUSTRIES ONLY, NOT SERVICE INDUSTRY - In this Dec. 3, 2018, photo, a police station is seen inside the Artux City Vocational Skills Education Training Service Center at the Kunshan Industrial Park in Artux in western China's Xinjiang region. Across the Xinjiang region, a growing number of internment camps have been built, where by some estimates 1 million Muslims are detained, forced to give up their language and their religion and subject to political indoctrination. Now, the Chinese government is also forcing some detainees to work in manufacturing and food industries, in what activists call "black factories." (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
CORRECTS TO SAY MANUFACTURING AND FOOD INDUSTRIES ONLY, NOT SERVICE INDUSTRY - In this Wednesday, Dec. 5, 2018, photo, slogans which reads "Technical skill in hand, No worries finding a job", "Theme of prospering the people, with service as the central tenet" are seen on the barbed wire fences around the "Hotan City apparel employment training base" where Hetian Taida has a factory in Hotan in western China's Xinjiang region. This is one of a growing number of internment camps in the Xinjiang region, where by some estimates 1 million Muslims are detained, forced to give up their language and their religion and subject to political indoctrination. Now, the Chinese government is also forcing some detainees to work in manufacturing and food industries, in what activists call "black factories." (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
CORRECTS TO SAY MANUFACTURING AND FOOD INDUSTRIES ONLY, NOT SERVICE INDUSTRY - In this Dec. 3, 2018, photo, a child walks past a large screen showing Chinese President Xi Jinping near a carpark in Kashgar, western China's Xinjiang region. Across the Xinjiang region, a growing number of internment camps have been built, where by some estimates 1 million Muslims are detained, forced to give up their language and their religion and subject to political indoctrination. Now, the Chinese government is also forcing some detainees to work in manufacturing and food industries, in what activists call "black factories." (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
CORRECTS TO SAY MANUFACTURING AND FOOD INDUSTRIES ONLY, NOT SERVICE INDUSTRY - In this Monday, Dec. 3, 2018, photo, a building with the words "Neighborhood Center" at the top is seen behind barbed wire fences in the Artux City Vocational Skills Education Training Service Center at the Kunshan Industrial Park in Artux in western China's Xinjiang region. This is one of a growing number of internment camps in the Xinjiang region, where by some estimates 1 million Muslims are detained, forced to give up their language and their religion and subject to political indoctrination. Now, the Chinese government is also forcing some detainees to work in manufacturing and food industries, in what activists call "black factories." (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
In this Dec. 6, 2018, photo, Tursynzhan Issanali, a cab driver, holds up pictures of his detained wife and daughter at the office of an advocacy group for ethnic Kazakhs born in China in Almaty, Kazakhstan. Issanali says his wife was taken to an internment camp last year and was transferred to a fabric factory in October. He says his wife makes 600 yuan (about $87) a month and is required to live in factory dormitories six days a week. (AP Photo/ Dake Kang)
FILE - In this file image from undated video footage run by China's CCTV via AP Video, Muslim trainees work in a garment factory in the Hotan Vocational Education and Training Center in Hotan, Xinjiang, northwest China. China's state broadcaster CCTV aired the report Tuesday, Oct. 16, 2018, on the so-called vocational education and training center, with the Muslim trainees telling the camera how they have been saved from dangerous and poor lives and how grateful they are to the authorities. (CCTV via AP Video, File)
CORRECTS TO SAY MANUFACTURING AND FOOD INDUSTRIES ONLY, NOT SERVICE INDUSTRY - In this Monday, Dec. 3, 2018, photo, a guard tower and barbed wire fences are seen around a facility in the Kunshan Industrial Park in Artux in western China's Xinjiang region. This is one of a growing number of internment camps in the Xinjiang region, where by some estimates 1 million Muslims are detained, forced to give up their language and their religion and subject to political indoctrination. Now, the Chinese government is also forcing some detainees to work in manufacturing and food industries, in what activists call "black factories." (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)
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