A vote of no confidence has been triggered in Britain's prime minister Theresa May

  • A vote of no confidence in Theresa May's leadership is to be held by Conservative MPs.
  • More than 15% of Conservative MPs submitted a letter calling on her to quit.
  • A vote will be held by Tory MPs on Wednesday evening to confirm the challenge.
  • Conservative MPs call on May to quit rather than drag the party through an extended contest.

A no-confidence vote is to be held on Theresa May's leadership after more than 48 Conservative MPs submitted a letter calling for her to stand down.

A statement by the the Chairman of the 1922 Committee of Conservative MPs, Graham Brady, confirmed that 15% of Conservative MPs had called for her to quit, meaning a vote on her future will now go ahead.

He added that a ballot would be held on Wednesday evening by Conservative MPs. 

Under party rules more than half of Conservative MPs must support the challenge in order for a full contest to go ahead.

"The threshold of 15% of the parliamentary party seeking a vote of no confidence in the leader of the Conservative Party has been exceeded," Brady wrote.

"In accordance with the rules, a ballot will be held between 1800 and 2000 on Wednesday 12th December."

The prime minister will address the 1922 Committee of Conservative backbenchers this evening before the vote is called.

Under Conservative party rules more than half of May's MPs must support the call for her to stand down in order for a leadership contest to go ahead.

If May were to be successful in such a vote then another ballot on the question of her leadership could not be held for another year, under party rules.

However, if she loses the vote then she will be excluded from any contest. Conservative MPs will then go through a process of selecting their top two candidates for the job of leader, which will then be voted on by all party members.

15 PHOTOS
President Trump and Theresa May in joint Chequers press conference
See Gallery
President Trump and Theresa May in joint Chequers press conference
Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May poses for photographs with U.S. President Donald Trump at Chequers near Aylesbury, Britain July 13, 2018. Jack Taylor/Pool via REUTERS
Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May greets U.S. President Donald Trump at Chequers near Aylesbury, Britain July 13, 2018. Jack Taylor/Pool via REUTERS
Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May and U.S. President Donald Trump arrive for a joint news conference in the grounds of Chequers near Aylesbury, Britain July 13, 2018. Jack Taylor/Pool via REUTERS
Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May and U.S. President Donald Trump walk in the grounds of Chequers near Aylesbury, Britain July 13, 2018. Jack Taylor/Pool via REUTERS
Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May and U.S. President Donald Trump hold a joint news conference at Chequers, the official country residence of the Prime Minister, near Aylesbury, Britain, July 13, 2018. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May and U.S. President Donald Trump walk to a joint news conference at Chequers, the official country residence of the Prime Minister, near Aylesbury, Britain, July 13, 2018. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May and U.S. President Donald Trump hold a joint news conference at Chequers, the official country residence of the Prime Minister, near Aylesbury, Britain, July 13, 2018. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May and U.S. President Donald Trump hold a joint news conference at Chequers, the official country residence of the Prime Minister, near Aylesbury, Britain, July 13, 2018. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May and U.S. President Donald Trump walk away after holding a joint news conference at Chequers, the official country residence of the Prime Minister, near Aylesbury, Britain, July 13, 2018. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
U.S. President Donald Trump walks with Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May prior to a joint press conference at Chequers, near Aylesbury, Britain July 13, 2018. Stefan Rousseau/Pool via REUTERS
U.S. President Donald Trump and British Prime Minister Theresa May hold a press conference after their meeting at Chequers in Buckinghamshire, Britain July 13, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
British Prime Minister Theresa May listens as she and U.S. President Donald Trump hold a press conference after their meeting at Chequers in Buckinghamshire, Britain July 13, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
US President Donald Trump (L) gestures as he speaks next to Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May (R) during a press conference following their meeting at Chequers, the prime minister's country residence, near Ellesborough, northwest of London on July 13, 2018 on the second day of Trump's UK visit. - US President Donald Trump launched an extraordinary attack on Prime Minister Theresa May's Brexit strategy, plunging the transatlantic 'special relationship' to a new low as they prepared to meet Friday on the second day of his tumultuous trip to Britain. (Photo by Jack Taylor / POOL / Getty Images) (Photo credit should read JACK TAYLOR/AFP/Getty Images)
US President Donald Trump (L) speaks during a press conference with Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May (R) following their meeting at Chequers, the prime minister's country residence, near Ellesborough, northwest of London on July 13, 2018 on the second day of Trump's UK visit. - US President Donald Trump launched an extraordinary attack on Prime Minister Theresa May's Brexit strategy, plunging the transatlantic 'special relationship' to a new low as they prepared to meet Friday on the second day of his tumultuous trip to Britain. (Photo by Jack Taylor / POOL / Getty Images) (Photo credit should read JACK TAYLOR/AFP/Getty Images)
AYLESBURY, ENGLAND - JULY 13: Prime Minister Theresa May holds bi-lateral talks with U.S. President Donald Trump at Chequers on July 13, 2018 in Aylesbury, England. US President, Donald Trump, held bi-lateral talks with British Prime Minister, Theresa May at her grace-and-favour country residence, Chequers. Earlier British newspaper, The Sun, revealed criticisms of Theresa May and her Brexit policy made by President Trump in an exclusive interview. Later today The President and First Lady will join Her Majesty for tea at Windsor Castle. (Photo by Jack Taylor-WPA Pool/Getty Images)
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

In a statement, the Chairman and Deputy Chairman of the European Research Group of Conservative MPs, Jacob Rees-Mogg and Steve Baker called on May to quit right away.

"Theresa May’s plan would bring down the government if carried forward. But our Party will rightly not tolerate it. Conservatives must now answer whether they wish to draw ever closer to an election under Mrs May’s leadership. In the national interest, she must go," they said.

However, May received support from the Home Secretary Sajid Javid, who is seen as one of the favourites to suceeed her.

"The last thing our country needs right now is a Conservative Party leadership election," he tweeted on Wednesday.

"Will be seen as self-indulgent and wrong. PM has my full support and is best person to ensure we leave EU on 29 March."

She was also backed by the Work and Pensions Secretary Amber Rudd, who tweeted that "The PM has my full support. At this critical time we need to support and work with the PM to deliver on leaving the EU, & our domestic agenda - ambitious for improvements to people’s lives & to build on growth of wages & jobs."

Read Graham Brady's letter

no confidenceSky News

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.