Jerome Corsi ethics complaint accuses Mueller of coercing 'false testimony'

Attorneys representing Jerome Corsi filed an ethics complaint Monday accusing prosecutors in Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s office of pressuring their client to provide “false testimony” against Republican operative Roger Stone and President Trump.

“Dr. Corsi has been threatened with immediate indictment by Mueller’s prosecutorial staff unless he testifies falsely against Roger Stone and/or President Donald Trump and his presidential campaign, among other false testimony,” Corsi’s lawyers, Larry Klayman and David Gray, said in a complaint submitted to acting attorney general Matthew Whitaker.

Prosecutors working on behalf of special counsel Robert Mueller offered Corsi a plea deal that would require him to admit to making false statements about his communications with Stone, but Corsi says he rejected the deal because he does not believe he knowingly misled prosecutors.

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People reportedly interviewed in Robert Mueller's Russia probe
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People reportedly interviewed in Robert Mueller's Russia probe

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions 

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Former FBI Director James Comey

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Former White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus

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Former White House press secretary Sean Spicer

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White House Director of Strategic Communications Hope Hicks

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Trump advisor Stephen Miller

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President Trump's son-in-law and senior advisor Jared Kushner 

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Don McGahn, general counsel for the Trump transition team

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Christopher Steele, the former MI6 agent who compiled the reported Trump dossier 

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Sam Clovis, a former member of the Trump campaign

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CIA Director Mike Pompeo
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At issue is a September 6 interview in which Corsi told prosecutors he did not communicate with anyone about WikiLeaks’s then-impending release of hacked information about the Clinton campaign. Citing three emails Corsi sent to Stone in 2016, prosecutors informed him that they had evidence to the contrary and, after reviewing those emails, Corsi amended his testimony.

“Word is friend in embassy plans 2 more dumps. One shortly after I’m back. 2nd in Oct. Impact planned to be very damaging,” Corsi wrote in one August 2016 email to Stone, apparently referring to WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange.

While Corsi admitted to communicating with Stone about the WikiLeaks hack once confronted with the emails, he maintains that he did not know of WikiLeaks’s plans in advance and did not in any way coordinate the release of the hacked information.

According to Corsi, prosecutors continue to offer him leniency in exchange for his admission that he served as a middleman between Stone and Assange — a charge that Corsi continues to deny.

Trump praised Stone in a Monday tweet, in which he echoed Corsi’s accusation that Mueller is using plea deals in an attempt to compel false testimony against the president.

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