Photo thought to be of Vincent van Gogh is his brother

THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — One of only two known photos of painter Vincent van Gogh turns out to most likely be an image of his brother, Theo, the Van Gogh Museum announced Thursday.

Forensic testing by experts at Amsterdam University "confirmed the high likelihood of the boy in the photograph being the 15-year-old Theo van Gogh, and not Vincent," the Amsterdam museum said.

The museum says there is now only one known photographic portrait of the camera-shy Dutch artist, taken when he was 19. Both photos are in the museum's collection.

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Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam, Netherlands
A guest admires Vincent van Gogh's painting "Self-Portrait with Bandaged Ear" during the opening of the exhibit Van Gogh & Japan at the Van Gogh museum in Amsterdam, Netherlands, Thursday, March 22, 2018. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
A visitor looks at letters from Vincent van Gogh to Dutch artist Anthon van Rappard at the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam June 26, 2006. The letters reveal the intense contact between these two artists between 1881 and 1885 and are accompanied by some sketches. The letters were recently acquired by the Van Gogh Museum and were offered by their former owner. The purchase was made possible with the support of various financial contributors. REUTERS/Koen van Weel (NETHERLANDS)
A guest admires the exhibit Van Gogh & Japan during the official opening at the Van Gogh museum in Amsterdam, Netherlands, Thursday, March 22, 2018. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
Letters from Vincent van Gogh to Dutch artist Anthon van Rappard are displayed at the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam June 26, 2006. The letters reveal the intense contact between these two artists between 1881 and 1885 and are accompanied by some sketches. The letters were recently acquired by the Van Gogh Museum and were offered by their former owner. The purchase was made possible with the support of various financial contributors. REUTERS/Koen van Weel (NETHERLANDS)
Dutch King Willem-Alexander, center, Japan's ambassador Hiroshi Inomata, left, and museum director Axel Ruger open the exhibit Van Gogh & Japan at the Van Gogh museum in Amsterdam, Netherlands, Thursday, March 22, 2018. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
Visitors look at letters from Vincent van Gogh to Dutch artist Anthon van Rappard at the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam June 26, 2006. The letters reveal the intense contact between these two artists between 1881 and 1885 and are accompanied by some sketches. The letters were recently acquired by the Van Gogh Museum and were offered by their former owner. The purchase was made possible with the support of various financial contributors. REUTERS/Koen van Weel (NETHERLANDS)
Letters from Vincent van Gogh to Dutch artist Anthon van Rappard are displayed at the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam June 26, 2006. The letters reveal the intense contact between these two artists between 1881 and 1885 and are accompanied by some sketches. The letters were recently acquired by the Van Gogh Museum and were offered by their former owner. The purchase was made possible with the support of various financial contributors. REUTERS/Koen van Weel (NETHERLANDS)
Dutch Secretary of State for Culture Medy van der Laan looks at letters from Vincent van Gogh to Dutch artist Anthon van Rappard at the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam June 26, 2006. The letters reveal the intense contact between these two artists between 1881 and 1885 and are accompanied by some sketches. The letters were recently acquired by the Van Gogh Museum and were offered by their former owner. The purchase was made possible with the support of various financial contributors. REUTERS/Koen van Weel (NETHERLANDS)
A cameraman films Vincent van Gogh's "Almond Blossom" painting during the opening of the exhibit Van Gogh & Japan at the Van Gogh museum in Amsterdam, Netherlands, Thursday, March 22, 2018. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
Van Gogh Museum director Axel Rueger, left, and Jet Bussemaker, Minister for Education, Culture and Science, walk towards two stolen and recovered painting by Dutch master Vincent van Gogh during a press conference in Amsterdam, Netherlands, Tuesday, March 21, 2017. The two paintings titled "Seascape at Scheveningen" (1882) and "Congregation leaving the Reformed Church in Nuenen," (1884-1885) returned to the Amsterdam museum after they were stolen from in a nighttime heist 15 years ago and recovered by Naples police in Italy. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
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The photo now thought to be of Theo was first publicly presented in 1957 by researcher Mark Edo Tralbaut. A Dutch television program called into question whether it was indeed of Vincent in 2014, prompting further research.

"This discovery means that we have rid ourselves of an illusion while gaining a portrait of Theo," said Van Gogh Museum Director Axel Rueger. "We have essentially returned to the situation as it always was up to the mistaken identification in 1957, with a single photographic portrait of the young, 19-year-old Vincent van Gogh."

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