Woman accused of scamming 23 donors out of $8K for daughter who never had cancer

WAUSHARA COUNTY (WITI) -- A mother has been criminally charged -- accused of faking her toddler's cancer in a scheme for money. Emily Faber, 26, of Wautoma claims mental illness is what led to this, and she's still trying to do the right thing.

Faber faces one count of theft -- false representation (greater than $5,000 to $10,000) for money prosecutors said was collected between Dec. 4, 2017 and Jan. 19, 2018. A not guilty plea was entered on her behalf in court on Tuesday, Nov. 27. A $2,000 signature bond was set, and a status conference was scheduled for Jan. 2.

FOX6's Contact 6 first told you about the investigation surrounding Emily Faber back in March. We spoke with a Neshkoro business owner who hosted a chili cook-off fundraiser for Faber's daughter.

"I just couldn't imagine having a daughter go through that -- so anything to help," said Kayla Mailhot, owner of Kayla's Pub and Grub.

Shawnie Schuldt volunteered to sell bracelets for the cause at her salon in Redgranite.

"I found out shortly after I sold the last bracelet to stop selling them -- that the family had lied about the little girl being sick," said Schuldt in March.

Related: IRS scam arrest in India

8 PHOTOS
IRS scam arrest in India
See Gallery
IRS scam arrest in India
MUMBAI, INDIA - OCTOBER 5: Employees coming out of Delta IT Park building after police inquiry as police personnel arrested the accused employees for allegedly threatening the US citizens and siphoning off their money. Over 500 call centre employees were detained at Mira Road for allegedly cheating and robbing US citizens, on October 5, 2016 in Mumbai, India. According to the investigating team, the victims in the US were threatened with a 'tax investigation' by Mira Road call centre executives impersonating as American Internal Revenue Service (IRS) officials. (Photo by Pramod Thakur/Hindustan Times via Getty Images)
MUMBAI, INDIA - OCTOBER 5: Employees coming out of Delta IT Park building after police inquiry as police personnel arrested the accused employees for allegedly threatening the US citizens and siphoning off their money. Over 500 call centre employees were detained at Mira Road for allegedly cheating and robbing US citizens, on October 5, 2016 in Mumbai, India. According to the investigating team, the victims in the US were threatened with a 'tax investigation' by Mira Road call centre executives impersonating as American Internal Revenue Service (IRS) officials. (Photo by Pramod Thakur/Hindustan Times via Getty Images)
MUMBAI, INDIA - OCTOBER 5: Police personnel arrested the accused employees for allegedly threatening the US citizens and siphoning off their money, over 500 call centre employees were detained at Mira Road allegedly cheating and robbing US citizens, on October 5, 2016 in Mumbai, India. According to the investigating team, the victims in the US were threatened with a 'tax investigation' by Mira Road call centre executives impersonating as American Internal Revenue Services (IRS) officials. (Photo by Pramod Thakur/Hindustan Times via Getty Images)
MUMBAI, INDIA - OCTOBER 5: Police personnel arrest the accused employees for allegedly threatening the US citizens and siphoning off their money. Over 500 call centre employees were detained at Mira Road for allegedly cheating and robbing US citizens, on October 5, 2016 in Mumbai, India. According to the investigating team, the victims in the US were threatened with a 'tax investigation' by Mira Road call centre executives impersonating as American Internal Revenue Service (IRS) officials. (Photo by Pramod Thakur/Hindustan Times via Getty Images)
MUMBAI, INDIA - OCTOBER 5: Police personnel carrying in hard drives computer and laptops after arrested the accused employees for allegedly threatening the US citizens and siphoning off their money, over 500 call centre employees were detained at Mira Road allegedly cheating and robbing US citizens, on October 5, 2016 in Mumbai, India. According to the investigating team, the victims in the US were threatened with a 'tax investigation' by Mira Road call centre executives impersonating as American Internal Revenue Services (IRS) officials. (Photo by Pramod Thakur/Hindustan Times via Getty Images)
MUMBAI, INDIA - OCTOBER 5: Police personnel carrying in hard drives computer and laptops after arrested the accused employees for allegedly threatening the US citizens and siphoning off their money, over 500 call centre employees were detained at Mira Road allegedly cheating and robbing US citizens, on October 5, 2016 in Mumbai, India. According to the investigating team, the victims in the US were threatened with a 'tax investigation' by Mira Road call centre executives impersonating as American Internal Revenue Services (IRS) officials. (Photo by Pramod Thakur/Hindustan Times via Getty Images)
MUMBAI, INDIA - OCTOBER 5: Police personnel arrested the accused employees for allegedly threatening the US citizens and siphoning off their money, over 500 call centre employees were detained at Mira Road allegedly cheating and robbing US citizens, on October 5, 2016 in Mumbai, India. According to the investigating team, the victims in the US were threatened with a 'tax investigation' by Mira Road call centre executives impersonating as American Internal Revenue Services (IRS) officials. (Photo by Pramod Thakur/Hindustan Times via Getty Images)
MUMBAI, INDIA - OCTOBER 5: Police personnel arrested the accused employees for allegedly threatening the US citizens and siphoning off their money, over 500 call centre employees were detained at Mira Road allegedly cheating and robbing US citizens, on October 5, 2016 in Mumbai, India. According to the investigating team, the victims in the US were threatened with a 'tax investigation' by Mira Road call centre executives impersonating as American Internal Revenue Services (IRS) officials. (Photo by Pramod Thakur/Hindustan Times via Getty Images)
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

Family members spoke anonymously with Contact 6, and said the child herself thought she had cancer, but over time, they became skeptical.

"There was no fatigue. She was still just a normal little kid," a male relative said.

They tried calling Children's Hospital and visiting the little girl during treatment. They say they were eventually told she was never patient.

According to a criminal complaint, on the evening of Jan. 22, Faber turned herself in at the Waushara County Sheriff's Office on a fraud charge. She told investigators in November, she had taken her daughter (who is now 3 years old) to the doctor for a lump under her arm, which she was told might be cancer, and more tests were done. She said she told her family and friends about the possible diagnosis, and said a friend set up a GoFundMe.com account for her daughter. Meanwhile, Faber learned her daughter did not have cancer, but she didn't tell anyone. More than $8,000 was raised through the Go Fund Me account, which was put into the bank account of Faber's boyfriend -- the child's father. She said she would ask him for the debit card when she wanted to buy something, and estimated she spent around $2,000, but noted she wasn't the only one spending the money.

Related: 13 things that seem like scams but are actually great

14 PHOTOS
13 Things That Seem Like Scams But Are Actually Great
See Gallery
13 Things That Seem Like Scams But Are Actually Great
The site lets you know when movie screenings are happening so you can score free tickets.
The yellow cleaning spray named "Awesome" from the dollar store evidently lives up to its name. The guy who recommended it said that it really should be priced higher and he's never used it without gloves.

The dollar store toilet bowl cleaner named The Works is so strong it can etch concrete.
The cellphone company is designed to save you a bunch of money on your plan if you switch away from a major carrier.

This guy loves it: I seriously only pay $45 a month for unlimited everything for my Google Nexus 4 and also get great service since I have a AT&T compatible SIM card with them. Basically my service runs off of AT&T towers just without me having to pay $100 a month. It is cheap, and in the long run saves you a lot of money.

These seem like a clever ploy by Big Detergent to force you to spend more on rebranded soap.


Well, as it turns out they actually really work out well. Almost everyone uses a little too much detergent in their wash, but these little pods actually do the trick.

When one guy's friend hit a deer and had to unload his totaled car, JunkMyCar.com offered nearly six times as much for the Camry than local junkyards:

Submitted the request online, guy came out (to him) a day or two later with a truck, looked the car over to make sure everything checked out with the specs he submitted, handed him a check, and left with the car. Check cleared with no issues.

My guess is that they can give such a higher premium because they scrap the car and sell the parts online, so they'll have a much higher turnaround. Either that or it's some really eccentric millionaire finding new ways to pass the time.
I can personally confirm that Linux is awesome.

Here's why: "You mean I can get a fully-functional operating system for free, just download it off the website, and it's faster, more secure and easier than Windows? And it has thousands of free programs with it? And they're offering more and more games that often play better on Linux than Windows? Sure , whatever...."
But it's true!
It's a neoprene jacket you put on animals to reduce anxiety. It accomplishes this by gently squeezing them all over.

Got it for my frenchie who was going through anxiety after we moved, and it totally works on the short term and on the long term.

This pet comb really works: Furminator brush, a metal comb with tapered grooves that removes undercoat and reduces shedding. It's not a surprise it works, but how well it works. The ad photo with the husky surrounded by a giant pile of fur is exactly what happens.

Another endorsement: Bought a furminator yesterday and felt like a dumbass for spending $45 on a damn cat brush. Then I had a pile of fur twice the size of my cat.

Photo: sundaykofax, Flickr.com and _Tar0_, Flickr.com

Several people swear by this blender. The issue is that it's sold through infomercials which instantly sets off everyone's B.S. alarm.
You know those ads on television for sites offering free credit reports? Don't use those websites.
Congress made the credit report companies provide people with one free credit report per year, so they did that with AnnualCreditReport.com, but then made several easily confusable clones that charged money.

Here's the explanation: Annualcreditreport.com is run by the U.S. government and is designed to comply with the law requiring credit bureaus to give you your reports for free every so often.

Freecreditreport.com and sites like it are businesses who charge you money for these same services (or require that you bundle pay services with the free service of getting your report) [...] they're preying on the people who were trying to get their free report and just went to the wrong web address.

It's 100% Congressionally-mandated legitimacy. Check it out: AnnualCreditReport.com.
We're talking about Mr. Clean Magic Eraser kind of products. It perfectly breaks down any kind of material from very fine cracks and textures.

People use these on white sneakers to wild success, and one Redditor cleaned a horrifying tub in a new apartment to the point it looked like new. One guy used a similar product, Barkeeper's Friend, to get a sharpie'd genital off of his fridge.

RainX is the stuff you spread apply to your windshield that repels rain, meaning that you don't actually have to use your windshield wipers.

Here's one Redditor's endorsement: First, it will last a lot longer than a few days if you follow the directions to a tee. If it's at all cool air temps when you apply it, turn on your defroster for a while to heat up the window. Helps a lot. When you get up to speeds that make the rain "skitter" off the windshield, stop using the wipers; this speed will vary depending on the angle of your window. [...]

Photo: Kjarrett, Flickr.com
Lastly, I've heard Aquapel makes Rain‑X appear as though a drunken monkey had smeared feces over your window in comparison. I can't personally speak to this, as I cannot afford Aquapel.  Sounds fun.

Sold by the late but legendary pitchman Billy Mays, the sodium percarbonate cleaning product is actually really, really good at cleaning anything.

Granted, you can get the same chemical off-brand at a pool supply store for a fifth of the price, but the stuff just annihilates stains.
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

The complaint said Faber told investigators "the money was too tempting, and she didn't know how to tell people the truth." She advised there was another account set up at a bank that she didn't have access to. She said she would drive to Milwaukee, where her daughter was supposedly being treated for cancer, and Children's Hospital officials contacted police, who contacted Faber to ask questions. She said she shut down the Go Fund Me account after that -- advising that she spent the money on gas, driving to Milwaukee, and "buying other things."

She said she "had a guilty conscience and wanted to make things right by turning herself in." The complaint said Faber told investigators she didn't tell anyone her daughter didn't have cancer "because she had not been taking her medication and wasn't thinking clearly."

In addition to the Go Fund Me account, the complaint said friends of Faber set up a local fundraiser and bracelets to raise money, but Faber said none of that money had been released to her. One of those friends told investigators after learning Faber's daughter might have cancer, she saw a Facebook post by Faber indicating her daughter had Stage 2 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, with the cancer located in her armpit and chest. The friend said she then reached out to Faber "to see if there was anything she could do to help." That friend soon launched the Go Fund Me account in December of 2017 -- which was shared on social media. She said when the account was closed, there was about $8,000 in it.

After that, the friend was in contact with a bar owner in Wautoma, who said she partnered with another business owner -- both of whom were friends with Faber's family. They opened the bank account for fundraising money to be deposited into. That account was linked to the Go Fund Me account. In early January, the friend said Faber reached out for the Go Fund Me password because she wanted to shut the account down "because people were saying negative things, accusing her of using the money for inappropriate things." The friend said she thinks this is when Faber changed the account number for where the money was deposited. She provided records showing $7,000 was withdrawn from the account.

Investigators spoke with the child's father, who indicated he was present for a follow-up doctor's appointment where the doctor examined the lump on the girl's arm and said he thought it was going away, and didn't need to be biopsied. He said Faber "started arguing with the doctor that it is cancer and asking why he wasn't taking this seriously." The child's father said Faber told him for insurance purposes she needed a second opinion that it was cancer, and took the child to Children's Hospital. After that, she said the child had blood drawn and it was determined that the girl had "a slow growing, aggressive cancer." He said Faber indicated "people might think this is fake and that's why she wanted business owners from the community to be in charge of the fundraising bank account" for the girl. The Go Fund Me money was supposed to go into that account as well, but the bank account wasn't set up when people started donating. He said he offered his bank account since Faber didn't have one, and the money was then supposed to be transferred into the bank account for the daughter once it was set up. Faber said "she had spoken with the trustees of the account and they told her to keep the Go Fund Me money and use it for travel expenses to Milwaukee." He estimated he had spent about $1,000 on "things for the house, food, items for the girls and bills." He said he found out in late January that the girl didn't have cancer.

The complaint said of the $7,435.18 in the Go Fund Me account, $72.22 was transferred into the bank account set up for the girl's medical expenses. Go Fund Me refunded the 23 donors. The complaint said the total amount Faber received from the Go Fund Me account and bank account was $8,246.22.

Faber told FOX6 she's in therapy and working to pay back those who donated, as required by the court. The father of the child said she's doing well, and he has custody of the two girls, while Faber gets supervised visits.

 
Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.