Sarah Sanders says climate report draws ‘radical conclusions’ and is not ‘based on facts’

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said that the recently-released U.S. government climate report draws “radical conclusions” and is not “based on facts.” 

At Tuesday’s press briefing, Sanders was asked if the president feels responsible “to lead…on climate change and preventing the calamity” the administration forecasts. 

She replied that the president is “leading on what matters most in this process and that’s clean air and clean water.” 

Sanders continued: “Even Obama’s undersecretary for science didn’t believe the radical conclusion of the report…and you have to look at the fact that this report is based on the most extreme modeled scenario which contradicts long-established trends.” 

She also stated that the findings are not “based on facts. It’s not data-driven…It’s based on modeling, which is extremely hard to do when you’re talking about the climate.”

Related: President trump on climate change:

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President Trump on climate change
U.S. President Donald Trump refers to amounts of temperature change as he announces his decision that the United States will withdraw from the landmark Paris Climate Agreement, in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, U.S., June 1, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 1: White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Scott Pruitt, and Vice President Mike Pence clap as President Donald Trump speaks about the US role in the Paris climate change accord in the Rose Garden at the White House in Washington, DC on Thursday, June 01, 2017. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
U.S. President Donald Trump refers to amounts of temperature change as he announces his decision that the United States will withdraw from the landmark Paris Climate Agreement in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, U.S., June 1, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 1: White House chief strategist Stephen Bannon walks out after President Donald Trump speaks about the US role in the Paris climate change accord in the Rose Garden at the White House in Washington, DC on Thursday, June 01, 2017. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 1: President Donald Trump speaks about the US role in the Paris climate change accord in the Rose Garden at the White House in Washington, DC on Thursday, June 01, 2017. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 1: President Donald Trump points as he walks back to the Oval Office after speaking about the US role in the Paris climate change accord in the Rose Garden at the White House in Washington, DC on Thursday, June 01, 2017. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 1: President Donald Trump speaks about the US role in the Paris climate change accord in the Rose Garden at the White House in Washington, DC on Thursday, June 01, 2017. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 1: President Donald Trump points out after speaking about the US role in the Paris climate change accord in the Rose Garden at the White House in Washington, DC on Thursday, June 01, 2017. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
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The report in question reflects the work of 13 federal agencies and warns that if actions to curb the effects of climate change are not taken, its effects will shrink the U.S. economy by 10% before the century ends. 

The New York Times notes: “There is always some uncertainty in climate projections, but scientists’ estimates about the effects of global warming to date have largely been borne out.”

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