Salvation Army apologizes after Hells Angels bell ringers don racist patches

The Salvation Army has apologized after bell-ringing volunteers from the Hells Angels were photographed brandishing several white supremacist patches on their clothes. 

The Times of Northwest Indiana reports that members of the motorcycle club were spotted outside a Walmart in Valparaiso, Indiana, over the weekend, wearing patches that included a Confederate flag and the word “Aryan.”

The Salvation Army was “embarrassed” that it was “unable to prevent this incident,” said Lieutenant Christopher Nicolai of the Salvation Army of Porter County.

He added that members of the Hells Angels Northwest Indiana Region would “not be allowed to volunteer in the future.”

“Our commitment to nondiscrimination includes a dress code for bell ringers, requiring that they wear red Salvation Army aprons, and making it clear that no ‘symbol, marking, or lettering that is viewed as discrimination’ may be worn,” Nicolai said in a statement provided to the Times. 

“Clearly, the bell ringers in question did not comply with this dress code.”

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20 PHOTOS
Salvation Army's Red Kettle Campaign through the years
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Salvation Army's Red Kettle Campaign through the years

A.J. Bromfield, left, a Salvation Army advisory board vice president of Western Federal Savings, and Lt. Edward World, Salvation Army officer, helped open the drive on December 1, 1963.  

(Photo By Bill Johnson/The Denver Post via Getty Images)

That's the first one, the first contribution to the Salvation Army's 1967 Christmas Kettle campaign. Walter Hoving, board chairman of Tiffany's, kicked off the campaign with his check in ceremonies at 57th St. and 5th Avenue.

(Photo by Vic DeLucia/New York Post Archives via Getty Images)

Mrs. Maryann Brewster tends the kettle and smiles as a donor puts a dime into a Salvation Army kettle in 1969.

(Photo By Bill Johnson/The Denver Post via Getty Images)

Salvation Army auxiliary volunteers wearing turn-of-the century Salvation Army costumes, Mrs. William Argall, left, and Mrs. Tor Westgaard manned Army's Chirstmas Kettle at Larimer Square in 1970.

(Photo By Millard Smith/The Denver Post via Getty Images)

Salvation Army volunteer Teresa Valverde rings her bell while collecting donations November 20, 2001 in New York City. The Salvation Army's 2001 National Kettle Campaign kick-off was held earlier in the day in New York.

(Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Santa Claus played by Harry Winters lifts up Justine Stewart (center), 4, of Valinda so that she can put a dollar in the Salvation Army kettle as her twin sister Jessica (right) watches on the Calico Stage at Knott's Berry Farm in Buena Park on Friday morning. The Salvation Army's Christmas campaign to collects donations for needy families.

(Photo by Kari Rene Hall/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)

Vancouver Salvation Army kettle attendant, Cameron Burke, processes a debit card donation with a wireless Interact machine known as the Schlumberger Magic 9000 December 21, 2003 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. The Salvation Army in Vancouver, Calgary and Edmonton are test piloting the Interact and, if successful, next year may take major credit cards to continue to raise money for the needy at Christmas time.

(Photo by Don MacKinnon/Getty Images)

A customer coming out of a Wal-Mart store donates to the Salvation Army as bell ringer Karrie Stasson watches on December 17, 2004 in Anaheim, California. The Salvation Army has announced that the Wal-Mart & Sam's Club Foundation were matching customers' Red Kettle contributions at more than 3,600 stores nationwide up to $1 million, through Christmas Eve, to help needy families in more than 9,000 communities across the country.

(Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)

Philadelphia Eagles wide receiver Reggie Brown lands in the Salvation Army donation kettle after missing a touchdown pass during the first half of NFL football action against the Dallas Cowboys in Irving, Texas December 16, 2007.

(REUTERS/Jessica Rinaldi)

A pedestrian makes a donation to the red kettle on the 16th Street Mall where Salvation Army Bell Ringer Merrill Fie is joined by his grandchildren, Tuesday, December 21, 2010. Fie is celebrating his 55th year of volunteering with the Salvation Army and is happy to be passing on the tradition to his family. He says, As I became familiar with the Salvation Army's work I realized this was for me. The Army is a good steward of peoples money. They manage to help the most people. They're administrative cost is very low. It's the best of the charities in seeing the money hit the pavement.' Looking at his grandchildren he says, 'I want to instill that in my grandchildren- to do good things for others. That will add great dimension to their lives.'

(Craig F. Walker/ The Denver Post) 

Sarah Bicking, 4, makes a donation to a Red Kettle on the 16th Street Mall, where Salvation Army Bell Ringer Merrill Fie was joined by his grandchildren on the 16th Street Mall, Tuesday, December 21, 2010. Fie is celebrating his 55th year of volunteering with the Salvation Army and is happy to be passing on the tradition to his family. He says, As I became familiar with the Salvation Army's work I realized this was for me. The Army is a good steward of peoples money. They manage to help the most people. They're administrative cost is very low. It's the best of the charities in seeing the money hit the pavement.' Looking at his grandchildren he says, 'I want to instill that in my grandchildren- to do good things for others. That will add great dimension to their lives.'

(Craig F. Walker/ The Denver Post)

U.S. Representative Gabrielle Giffords (D-AZ) is seen with Tucson Mayor Bob Walkup (R) at a Red Kettle program to raise money for the Salvation Army in Tucson, Arizona in this December 13, 2010 photo made available by the office of Rep. Giffords for Reuters on January 11, 2011. Giffords was in critical condition at a Tucson hospital but is "holding her own," responding to simple commands and breathing without the aid of her ventilation tube, her doctor said.

(REUTERS/U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords' office/Handout)

Salvation Army bell ringer volunteers William Schmidt (L), who is on his 20th year volunteering, and his grandson Bubba Wellens (R) ring their bells looking for a donation into a kettle outside a Giant grocery store November 24, 2012, in Clifton, Virgina. Salvation Army volunteers traditionally are seen collecting donations from holiday shopper for the needy between Thanksgiving and Christmas. Schmidt says he does it, ' to teach others the joy of giving.

(PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)

Salvation Army bell ringer volunteers William Schmidt (L), who is on his 20th year volunteering, and his grandson Bubba Wellens (R) ring their bells hoping for a donation into a kettle outside a Giant grocery store November 24, 2012, in Clifton, Virgina. Salvation Army volunteers traditionally are seen collecting donations from holiday shopper for the needy between Thanksgiving and Christmas. Schmidt says he does it, 'to teach others the joy of giving'.

(PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)

A young boy makes a donation as his parents stand off camera into a Salvation Army kettle outside a Giant grocery store November 24, 2012, in Clifton, Virgina. Bell ringers William Schmidt, who has worked as a volunteer for 20 years here, and his grandson Bubba Wellens (neither seen) volunteer for the Salvation Army to collect donations from holiday shoppers for the needy between Thanksgiving and Christmas. Schmidt does it all 'to teach others the joy of giving'.

(PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)

William Schmidt (R), and his grandson Bubba Wellens (L) pose for a photo when Schmidt's wife, Pat (C) shows up to check on her volunter family working in the cold at a Salvation Army donation kettle outside a Giant grocery store November 24, 2012, in Clifton, Virgina. Bell ringers William Schmidt, who has worked as a volunteer for 20 years at this store, and his grandson Bubba Wellens volunteer for the Salvation Army to collect donations from holiday shoppers for the needy between Thanksgiving and Christmas. Schmidt does it all 'to teach others the joy of giving'. 

(PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)

Bill Rollins, music director for Salvation Army, plays his instrument for the Salvation Army of Massachusetts Red Kettle 2012 campaign kick off, held by Brewer Fountain on the Boston Common.

(Photo by David L Ryan/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

A Walmart shopper drops change into the Salvation Army Kettle in Biddeford Friday, Dec. 20, 2013.

(Photo by Shawn Patrick Ouellette/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)

A fan donates to the Salvation Army red kettle before an NHL game between the Detroit Red Wings and the Toronto Maple Leafs on December 10, 2014 at Joe Louis Arena in Detroit, Michigan.

(Photo by Dave Reginek/NHLI via Getty Images)

Dallas Cowboys running back Ezekiel Elliott (21) jumps into the Salvation Army red kettle after scoring a second quarter touchdown against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers on Sunday, Dec. 18, 2016 at AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas.

(Richard W. Rodriguez/Fort Worth Star-Telegram/TNS via Getty Images)

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A Walmart spokesperson told CBS Chicago that the volunteers had been asked to leave as soon as employees were notified about the offensive attire. 

“We made the Salvation Army aware and they apologized,” the spokesperson said in a statement. “The Salvation Army is responsible for screening its volunteers stationed outside our stores. We’ve had a long history of supporting the Salvation Army and regret this isolated incident.” 

Hells Angels did not immediately respond to HuffPost’s request for comment on the incident. 

  • This article originally appeared on HuffPost.
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