James Comey responds to subpoena from Republicans: 'Let's invite everyone to see'

Former FBI Director James Comey and former Attorney General Loretta Lynch received subpoenas on Wednesday from House Republicans investigating the role of the FBI in the 2016 presidential election, and Comey responded to his with a Thanksgiving tweet.

“Happy Thanksgiving. Got a subpoena from House Republicans. I’m still happy to sit in the light and answer all questions. But I will resist a ‘closed door’ thing because I’ve seen enough of their selective leaking and distortion. Let’s have a hearing and invite everyone to see,” Comey wrote.

Lynch hasn’t publicly responded to hers.

Outgoing House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte (Va.) is requesting that Comey and Lynch testify at dispositions held Dec. 3 and 4, respectively, according to documents shared by Politico reporter Kyle Cheney

House Republicans’ probe into the FBI’s actions in 2016 will come to an end when Democrats take over the House in January. Republicans have alleged FBI bias against President Donald Trump has led to the bureau focusing on whether there were any Trump campaign ties to Russia instead of investigating Hillary Clinton’s use of a private email server for official business while she was secretary of state. 

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James Comey's life after President Trump fired him as FBI director
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James Comey's life after President Trump fired him as FBI director
James Comey, former director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), speaks during an interview in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, May 8, 2018. Comey said he's 'disappointed and disgusted' with Republican attacks on Special Counsel Robert Mueller's Russia investigation, a campaign led by former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani since he became one of President Donald Trump's top lawyers. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Former FBI Director James Comey arrives to speak about his book "A Higher Loyalty" in New York, U.S., April 18, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Attendees collect their copies of former FBI director James Comey's book as they arrive to hear him speak at an onstage interview at George Washington University in Washington, U.S. April 30, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Former FBI Director James Comey is sworn in prior to testifying before a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on Russia's alleged interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., June 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 07: Former FBI director James Comey laughs while answering questions during an interview forum at the Washington Post May 8, 2018 in Washington, DC. Comey discussed his stormy tenure as head of the FBI, his handling of the Hillary Clinton email investigation, his tense relationship with President Trump and his controversial firing a year ago, during the forum. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
Former FBI Director James Comey arrives for a taping of "The Late Show with Stephen Colbert" in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., April 17, 2018. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
Former FBI director James Comey speaks about his book during an onstage interview with Axios Executive Editor Mike Allen at George Washington University in Washington, U.S. April 30, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Former FBI Director James Comey testifies before a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on Russia's alleged interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., June 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Former Federal Bureau of Investigations Director James Comey departs after testifying before a closed session of the Senate Intelligence Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., U.S., June 8, 2017. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein
Former FBI Director James Comey testifies before a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on Russia's alleged interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., June 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 30: Former FBI Director James Comey talks onstage at George Washington University April 30, 3018 in Washington, DC. Comey discussed his new book 'Higher Loyalty: Truth, Lies, and Leadership.' (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Former FBI Director James Comey testifies before a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on "Russian Federation Efforts to Interfere in the 2016 U.S. Elections" on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S. June 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
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Democrats say that it’s all a distraction from special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia probe, which Trump has repeatedly described as a “witch hunt.”

Comey’s attorney David Kelley said his client would fight the subpoena in court.

“While the authority for congressional subpoenas is broad, it does not cover the right to misuse closed hearings as a political stunt to promote political as opposed to legislative agendas,” Kelley said.  

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Former Attorney General Loretta Lynch
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Former Attorney General Loretta Lynch
NEW YORK, NY - JUNE 20: Former Attorney General Loretta Lynch speaks at the New York Historical Society on June 20, 2017 in New York City. Lynch, who served under President Obama, received the Women in Public Life Award at the society's annual luncheon for the Strawberry festival. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch holds a news conference in Washington. U.S., January 11, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
U.S. President Barack Obama talks to the media during a meeting with Attorney General Loretta Lynch (L) and FBI Director James Comey (not photographed) at the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, U.S., July 19, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
Loretta Lynch, U.S. attorney general, speaks during a keynote session at the RSA Conference 2016 in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Tuesday, March 1, 2016. Lynch challenged Apple Inc.'s refusal to comply with a judge's order that it help unlock a dead terrorist's iPhone, bluntly questioning the company's insistence that it has the right to refuse to cooperate. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 24: Attorney General Loretta Lynch attends the dedication of the National Museum of African American History and Culture September 24, 2016 in Washington, DC, before the museum opens to the public later that day. The museum is a Smithsonian Institution museum located on the National Mall featuring African American history and culture in the US. (Photo by Astrid Riecken/Getty Images)
ROME, ITALY - OCTOBER 20: Loretta Lynch and Meryl Streep attend a party honouring Meryl Streep on October 20, 2016 in Rome, Italy. (Photo by Ernesto Ruscio/Getty Images)
MEET THE PRESS -- Pictured: (l-r) U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch appears on 'Meet the Press' in Washington, D.C., Sunday, Dec. 6, 2015. (Photo by: William B. Plowman/NBC/NBC NewsWire via Getty Images)
STERLING, VA - DECEMBER 12: U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch poses for a group photo with members of All Dulles Area Muslim Society (ADAMS) Center's BEAT Choir during an event December 12, 2016 in Sterling, Virginia. Lynch spoke to religious leaders and community members about the Department of Justice's efforts to combat hate crimes. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Loretta Lynch smiles before being sworn in as the 83rd Attorney General of the U.S. at the Department of Justice in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Monday, April 27, 2015. Lynch was confirmed by the Senate on April 23 as the first black woman to become U.S. attorney general after a five-month wait marked by partisan fights and Republican arguments that she won't be independent enough from President Barack Obama. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Attorney General Loretta Lynch speaks at the podium as Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel looks on at a news conference at the Dirksen U.S. Courthouse on Jan. 13, 2017 in Chicago. A damning U.S. Department of Justice report released Friday morning excoriates the Chicago Police Department for using excessive force and unfairly targeting minorities while providing shoddy training and little effective supervision or discipline. (Jose Osorio/Chicago Tribune/TNS via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 27: Loretta Lynch shakes hands with Judiciary Committee Chairman Patrick Leahy (D-VT) (L) after being sworn in as Attorney General during an event at the Justice Department April 27, 2015 in Washington, DC. Lynch is the 83rd Attorney General and is replacing Eric Holder. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
STERLING, VA - DECEMBER 12: U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch (L) is greeted by director of All Dulles Area Muslim Society (ADAMS) Center's BEAT Choir Hurunnessa Fariad (R) during an event December 12, 2016 in Sterling, Virginia. Lynch spoke to religious leaders and community members about the Department of Justice's efforts to combat hate crimes. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
US Vice-President Joe Biden delivers remarks prior to swearing-in Loretta E. Lynch as the 83rd Attorney General of the United States April 27, 2015 at the US Department of Justice in Washington, DC. AFP PHOTO/PAUL J. RICHARDS (Photo credit should read PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 27: US Vice President Joe Biden (L) swears in Loretta Lynch (R) as Attorney General as her husband Stephen Hargrove (2R) and father Lorenzo Lynch (2L) stand nearby during an event at the Justice Department April 27, 2015 in Washington, DC. Lynch is the 83rd Attorney General and is replacing Eric Holder. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 29: Character witnesses for Loretta Lynch raise their right hands as they are sworn in during her Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing January 29, 2015 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. If confirmed by the full Senate Ms. Lynch will succeed Eric Holder as the next U.S. Attorney General. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 27: Loretta Lynch speaks after being sworn in as Attorney General as a portrait of former Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy hangs on the wall neaby at the Justice Department April 27, 2015 in Washington, DC. Lynch is the 83rd attorney general and is replacing Eric Holder. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 28: U.S. attorney general nominee Loretta Lynch appears for her confirmation hearing at the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill on January 28, 2015 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Andrew Harnik for The Washington Post via Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 28: U.S. Attorney General nominee Loretta Lynch, left, shakes hands with chairman Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, right, as ranking member Sen. Pat Leahy, D-Vt., and Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., look on during her confirmation hearing in the Senate Judiciary Committee on Wednesday, Jan. 28, 2015. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch arrives for the dedication of the Smithsonianâs National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, U.S., September 24, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 28: U.S. Attorney General nominee Loretta Lynch testifies during her confirmation hearing at the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill on January 28, 2015 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Andrew Harnik for The Washington Post via Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 28: Loretta Lynch, United States Attorney for the Eastern District of New York, speaks at a press conference to announce a 20-count indictment against U.S. Representative Michael Grimm (R-NY, 11th District) on April 28, 2014 in New York City. Grimm's indictments include wire fraud, mail fraud, conspiring to defraud the United States, impeding the Internal Revenue Service, hiring and employing unauthorized aliens, and health care fraud. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
Loretta Lynch listens during her confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee January 28, 2015 in Washington, DC. Loretta Lynch, a prosecutor with the US Attorney Eastern District of New York, has been nominated to serve as US Attorney General. AFP PHOTO/BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
Committee chairman Senator Chuck Grassley (R-IA) (L) and ranking member Senator Patrick J. Leahy (D-VT) talk while Loretta Lynch speaks during her confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee January 28, 2015 in Washington, DC. Loretta Lynch, a prosecutor with the US Attorney Eastern District of New York, has been nominated to serve as US Attorney General. AFP PHOTO/BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 28: U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York Loretta Lynch leaves her for a break during her confirmation hearing before Senate Judiciary Committee January 28, 2015 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. If confirmed by the full Senate Ms. Lynch will succeed Eric Holder as the next U.S. Attorney General. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
Loretta Lynch listens to questions during her confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee January 28, 2015 in Washington, DC. Loretta Lynch, a prosecutor with the US Attorney Eastern District of New York, has been nominated to serve as US Attorney General. AFP PHOTO/BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 28: Lorenzo Lynch (2nd L), father of U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York Loretta Lynch (L), raises his hand as he is being introduced during a confirmation hearing before Senate Judiciary Committee January 28, 2015 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. Lynch will succeed Eric Holder to be the next U.S. Attorney General if confirmed by the Senate. Stephen Hargrove, husband of Loretta Lynch is on the right. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 28: U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York Loretta Lynch testifies during her confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee January 28, 2015 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. If confirmed by the full Senate Ms. Lynch will succeed Eric Holder as the next U.S. Attorney General. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
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