Trump expected to give border troops authority to defend border patrol agents

U.S. troops on the border with Mexico are expected to get authority from President Donald Trump to protect Customs and Border Protection personnel if they come under assault by migrants, two defense officials said.

The force protection mandate, which didn't exist before, was requested by the Department of Homeland Security and could go into effect Tuesday, the officials told NBC News.

Nearly 5,200 troops have been deployed to the border to join the 2,000 already stationed there. They are a mix of active duty, reserve and National Guard forces and in addition to thousands of border patrol agents already deployed to the area.

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Border Patrol agents working along the US-Mexico border
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Border Patrol agents working along the US-Mexico border
A Border Patrol agent drives his ATV during the official start for the construction of new bollard wall to replace 20-miles of primary vehicle barriers in Santa Teresa, New Mexico, United States April 9, 2018. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez
A border patrol agent carries a bale of marijuana following a drug bust by the Mexico-U.S. border in the Rio Grande Valley sector, near McAllen, Texas, U.S., April 5, 2018. REUTERS/Loren Elliott
Border Patrol agents are pictured during the official start for the construction of new bollard wall to replace 20-miles of primary vehicle barriers in Santa Teresa, New Mexico, United States April 9, 2018. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez
Ladders collected and discarded by U.S. Border Patrol agents are pictured near a section of border fence in Hidalgo, Texas, U.S., April 11, 2018. REUTERS/Loren Elliott
Border Patrol agents keep watch during the official start for the construction of new bollard wall to replace 20-miles of primary vehicle barriers in Santa Teresa, New Mexico, United States April 9, 2018. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Border patrol agents and a special operations group member from the Texas Ranger Division seize 297 pounds of marijuana following a drug bust by the Mexico-U.S. border in the Rio Grande Valley sector, near McAllen, Texas, U.S., April 5, 2018. REUTERS/Loren Elliott
An immigrant who jumped into a canal in an effort to escape capture after illegally crossing the Mexico-U.S. border gives up and turns himself in to a border patrol agent in the Rio Grande Valley sector, near McAllen, Texas, U.S., April 5, 2018. REUTERS/Loren Elliott
Border patrol agents briefly rest after seizing 297 pounds of marijuana in a drug bust by the Mexico-U.S. border in the Rio Grande Valley sector, near McAllen, Texas, U.S., April 5, 2018. REUTERS/Loren Elliott
Suspected drug mules are apprehended by border patrol agents following a drug bust at the Mexico-U.S. border in the Rio Grande Valley sector, near McAllen, Texas, U.S., April 5, 2018. REUTERS/Loren Elliott
Border patrol agents apprehend people who illegally crossed the border from Mexico into the U.S. in the Rio Grande Valley sector, near Falfurrias, Texas, U.S., April 4, 2018. REUTERS/Loren Elliott TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A Border Patrol vehicle is seen by the current border fence in Sunland Park, U.S., in this picture taken from the Mexican side of the border in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico April 4, 2018. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez
A border patrol agent apprehends people who illegally crossed the border from Mexico into the U.S. in the Rio Grande Valley sector, near Falfurrias, Texas, U.S., April 4, 2018. REUTERS/Loren Elliott
An agent from the US Customs and Border Protection Agency patrols along the border between Santa Teresa, Nuevo Mexico State, in the US, and Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua State, in Mexico, on April 9, 2018 where the US plans to build a 32-km-long steel wall. Mexico is carrying out a sweeping review of its cooperation with the neighbouring United States because of 'blatant' tension with Donald Trump's administration, the foreign minister said Monday. / AFP PHOTO / HERIKA MARTINEZ (Photo credit should read HERIKA MARTINEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
A US Border Patrol agent stands along the border fence on April 6, 2018 in Calexico, California. US President Donald Trump on April 5, 2018 said he would send thousands of National Guard troops to the southern border, amid a widening spat with his Mexican counterpart Enrique Pena Nieto. The anti-immigration president said the National Guard deployment would range from 2,000 to 4,000 troops, and he would 'probably' keep many personnel on the border until his wall is built -- spelling out a lengthy mission. / AFP PHOTO / Sandy Huffaker (Photo credit should read SANDY HUFFAKER/AFP/Getty Images)
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The operation, renamed earlier this month from "Operation Faithful Patriot" to "border support," will cost at minimum $200 million, estimates say.

Officials familiar with the plans told NBC News last week that the troops would probably find themselves with little to do. For the most part, without authority to guard CBP personnel, they are laying barbed wire barriers and erecting tent facilities for themselves and the Border Patrol.

Trump has floated sending as many as 15,000 troops to the area.

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