Trump on Abrams: 'One of the most extreme, far-left politicians in the entire country'

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump praised Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp, the Republican candidate for governor, saying on Sunday that his campaign has been "extraordinary" and tagging Democrat Stacey Abrams as an extremist.

"He studied for this job for a longtime. He will be a great executive and he will keep Georgia on the path it is going, which is up," Trump told reporters as he left the White House for a campaign rally with Kemp in Macon, Georgia.

At the event, Trump ripped into Abrams.

"If Stacey Abrams gets in, your 2nd Amendment is gone," Trump said. "Stacey Abrams is one of the most extreme, far-left politicians in the entire country."

Abrams has said she supports the 2nd Amendment but also favors stricter gun control.

Trump called Abrams weak on crime and claimed, "You put Stacey in there and you are going to have Georgia turn into Venezuela" — a criticism the president has made against many Democrats.

RELATED: Georgia Republican gubernatorial nominee Brian Kemp:,

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FILE PHOTO: Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp speaks with visitors to the state capitol about the "SEC primary" involving a group of southern states voting next month in Atlanta, Georgia, U.S., February 24, 2016. REUTERS/Letitia Stein/File Photo
Vice President Mike Pence, left, and Republican gubernatorial candidate Brian Kemp greet the crowd during a "Get Out The Vote" rally at the Dalton Convention Center on Thursday, Nov. 1, 2018 in Dalton, Ga. Republican Brian Kemp is facing off against Democrat Stacey Abrams for governor in Georgia.(C.B. Schmelter/Chattanooga Times Free Press via AP)
Republican gubernatorial candidate Brian Kemp waves to the crowd during a "Get Out The Vote" rally at the Dalton Convention Center on Thursday, Nov. 1, 2018 in Dalton, Ga. Republican Brian Kemp is facing off against Democrat Stacey Abrams for governor in Georgia.(C.B. Schmelter/Chattanooga Times Free Press via AP)
GOP gubernatorial candidate Brian Kemp waves to his supporters during a Get Out The Vote rally at Dalton Convention Center in Dalton on Thursday, Nov. 1, 2018. Kemp is trying to extend the Republican domination in Georgia, which hasn't elected a Democrat as governor since 1998. He's banking on running up wide margins outside metro Atlanta and holding most of the GOP votes closer to the city. (Hyosub Shin /Atlanta Journal-Constitution via AP)
Vice President Mike Pence and GOP gubernatorial candidate Brian Kemp wave to supporters at Dalton Convention Center in Dalton, Ga., on Thursday, Nov. 1, 2018. Kemp is trying to extend the Republican domination in Georgia, which hasn't elected a Democrat as governor since 1998. He's banking on running up wide margins outside metro Atlanta and holding most of the GOP votes closer to the city. (Hyosub Shin /Atlanta Journal-Constitution via AP)
People hold up signs for Republican gubernatorial candidate Brian Kemp during a rally at the Dalton Convention Center on Thursday, Nov. 1, 2018, in Dalton, Ga. Kemp is facing off against Democrat Stacey Abrams for governor in Georgia. (C.B. Schmelter/Chattanooga Times Free Press via AP)
Republican gubernatorial candidate for Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp, center, speaks as Democrat Stacey Abrams, left, and Libertarian Ted Metz look on during a debate Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2018, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/John Bazemore, Pool)
Georgia Pubic Service Commission Chairman Lauren "Bubba'" McDonald, left, sings as he stands on stage with Donald Trump Jr., Kimberly Guilfoyle and Republican nominee for Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp, right, Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2018, in Athens, Ga. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
Brian Kemp, the Republican nominee for Georgia governor, answers questions Friday, Sept. 21, 2018, during an appearance at a conference of the Georgia Economic Developers Association in Savannah, Ga. Kemp faces Democrat Stacey Abrams in the general election Nov. 6, 2018. (AP Photo/Russ Bynum)
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Kemp is running in a close race against Abrams, who would become the first black woman to be elected governor in the country if she wins.

Georgia's history of voter disenfranchisement, coupled with Abram's historic campaign, and recent vote fraud and suppression charges from both sides have put voter rights issues front and center in the governor's race.

Kemp has come under fire from Democrats for allegedly suppressing minority votes in his role as secretary of state, which oversees elections in the state. And Kemp accused the state Democratic Party on Sunday of an attempted hack of the voter registration system. The Democratic Party called Kemp’s accusations, for which he provided no evidence or specifics, a "political stunt."

"If she gets in, Georgia goes backwards," Trump said before leaving he White House. "If he gets in, Georgia goes forward."

Trump also expressed confidence in GOP enthusiasm just two days before the midterm election on Tuesday.

"I have never seen such an enthusiastic Republican Party," Trump told reporters. "The level of fervor, the level of fever, is very strong on the Republican side."

Trump finished his campaigning Sunday night in Chattanooga with Republican Senate candidate Rep. Marsha Blackburn.

Blackburn has found herself in a surprisingly close race against former Democratic governor Phil Bredesen in a state that Trump carried by more than 20 points in 2016. A recent NBC/Marist poll shows 51 percent of likely voters supporting Blackburn compared to 46 for Bredesen, within the poll’s margin of error.

Despite Bredesen’s reputation as a moderate bipartisan, Trump attempted to portray him as a fringe candidate — an attack the president frequently uses on the campaign trail.

"Marsha is running against a far-left liberal — and you are finding that out finally — named Phil Bredesen," Trump said to the Tennessee rally goers. "He is the handpicked candidate of Chuck Schumer."

Blackburn, too, was there to remind voters of the “D” next to Bredesen’s name.

"If my opponent had his way, Hillary Clinton...would be president," Blackburn said, inciting a change of "Lock her up!" from the crowd. "Not any of this would be happening," Blackburn added, touting Trump’s accomplishments.

Trump will hold rallies in Ohio, Indiana and Missouri on Monday for his final day of midterm campaigning before the Tuesday election.

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