Tennessee inmate is scheduled to die in the electric chair

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Tennessee is scheduled to execute a double-murderer in the electric chair Thursday evening.

If it goes ahead as scheduled, Edmund Zagorski will be only the second person put to death by electrocution in Tennessee since 1960. Daryl Holton chose to die in the electric chair in 2007.

The last person to be executed by electrocution in the U.S. was Robert Gleason, who was put to death in Virginia in 2013.

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Zagorski chose the chair after his legal challenge to Tennessee's midazolam-based lethal injection protocol failed. His attorneys say he believes death by electrocution will be quicker, but he maintains that both methods are unconstitutional.

Zagorski was sentenced to die in 1984 for the murder of two men in a drug deal.

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