Man says traffic made him miss doomed Lion Air crash, believed to have killed everyone on board

A man who was supposed to be on the Lion Air jet that crashed on Monday morning, reportedly killing all 189 people on board, didn't catch the ill-fated flight because of traffic in Jakarta, Indonesia's capital.

Sony Setiawan, an employee at Indonesia's Ministry of Finance, told Agence France-Press (AFP) that he and his colleagues take Flight JT 610 from Jakarta to Pangkal Pinang, Indonesia, every week for work.

However, Setiawan said he ended up stuck in such severe traffic on Monday that he arrived at the airport as the Boeing-737 was taking off with 20 of his coworkers on board. 

"I usually take JT 610 — my friends and I always take this plane," Setiawan told the outlet. "I don’t know why the traffic at the toll road was so bad. I usually arrive in Jakarta at 3 a.m. but this morning I arrived at the airport at 6:20 and I missed the flight."

Setiawan told AFP that he cried the first time he learned about the tragic accident, which wasn't until he landed in Pangkal Pinang on another flight.

"I know my friends were on that flight," he told the outlet. "My family was in shock and my mother cried, but I told them I was safe, so I just have to be grateful."

Photos from the scene: 

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Indonesia flight crashes after taking off
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Indonesia flight crashes after taking off
JAKARTA, INDONESIA - OCTOBER 29: Search and rescue workers move the remains of a victim of the Lion Air flight JT 610 into a waiting ambulance at the Tanjung Priok port on October 29, 2018 in Jakarta, Indonesia. Lion Air Flight JT 610 crashed shortly after take-off with no sign so far of survivors among the 189 people on board the plane. (Photo by Ed Wray/Getty Images)
Debris from the ill-fated Lion Air flight JT 610 floats at sea in the waters north of Karawang, West Java province, on October 29, 2018. - All 189 passengers and crew aboard a crashed Indonesian Lion Air jet were 'likely' killed in the accident, the search and rescue agency said on October 29, as it announced it had found human remains. (Photo by ADEK BERRY / AFP) (Photo credit should read ADEK BERRY/AFP/Getty Images)
A relative of passengers prays as she and others wait for news on a Lion Air plane that crashed off Java Island at Depati Amir Airport in Pangkal Pinang, Indonesia Monday, Oct. 29, 2018. Indonesia disaster agency says that the Lion Air Boeing 737-800 plane crashed into sea shortly after it left Indonesia's capital Monday morning. (AP Photo/Hadi Sutrisno)
Members of Indonesian National Search and Rescue Agency (BASARNAS) carry body bags containing the remains recovered from the area where a Lion Air passenger jet is suspected to crash, at Tanjung Priok Port in Jakarta, Indonesia Monday, Oct. 29, 2018. A Lion Air flight crashed into the sea just minutes after taking off from Indonesia's capital on Monday in a blow to the country's aviation safety record after the lifting of bans on its airlines by the European Union and U.S. (AP Photo/Tatan Syuflana)
A member of Indonesian Search and Rescue Agency (BASARNAS) inspects debris believed to be from Lion Air passenger jet that crashed off Java Island at Tanjung Priok Port in Jakarta, Indonesia Monday, Oct. 29, 2018. A Lion Air flight crashed into the sea just minutes after taking off from Indonesia's capital on Monday in a blow to the country's aviation safety record after the lifting of bans on its airlines by the European Union and U.S. (AP Photo/Tatan Syuflana)
Rescuers search for victims of a Lion Air passenger jet that crashed in the waters off Tanjung Karawang, Indonesia Monday, Oct. 29, 2018. The Lion Air flight crashed into the sea just minutes after taking off from Indonesia's capital on Monday in a blow to the country's aviation safety record after the lifting of bans on its airlines by the European Union and U.S. (AP Photo/Achmad Ibrahim)
Members of Indonesian Search and Rescue Agency (BASARNAS) inspect debris recovered from near the waters where a Lion Air passenger jet is suspected to crash, at Tanjung Priok Port in Jakarta, Indonesia Monday, Oct. 29, 2018. A Lion Air flight crashed into the sea just minutes after taking off from Indonesia's capital on Monday in a blow to the country's aviation safety record after the lifting of bans on its airlines by the European Union and U.S. (AP Photo/Tatan Syuflana)
Customers sit near a Lion Air counter at Soekarno-Hatta International Airport in Tangerang, Indonesia Monday, Oct. 29, 2018. A Lion Air flight crashed into the sea just minutes after taking off from Indonesia's capital on Monday in a blow to the country's aviation safety record after the lifting of bans on its airlines by the European Union and the U.S. (AP Photo/Tatan Syuflana)
Relatives of passengers arrive at Lion Air's crisis center at Soekarno-Hatta International Airport in Tangerang, Indonesia Monday, Oct. 29, 2018. A Lion Air flight crashed into the sea just minutes after taking off from Indonesia's capital on Monday in a blow to the country's aviation safety record after the lifting of bans on its airlines by the European Union and the U.S. (AP Photo/Tatan Syuflana)
A man takes photo of the list of passengers of Lion Air flight JT610 at Soekarno-Hatta International Airport in Tangerang, Indonesia Monday, Oct. 29, 2018. The Lion Air flight crashed into the sea just minutes after taking off from Indonesia's capital on Monday in a blow to the country's aviation safety record after the lifting of bans on its airlines by the European Union and U.S. (AP Photo/Tatan Syuflana)
A relative of passengers weeps as she arrives at Lion Air's crisis center at Soekarno-Hatta International Airport in Tangerang, Indonesia Monday, Oct. 29, 2018. A Lion Air flight crashed into the sea just minutes after taking off from Indonesia's capital on Monday in a blow to the country's aviation safety record after the lifting of bans on its airlines by the European Union and U.S. (AP Photo/Tatan Syuflana)
A relative of passengers arrive at Lion Air's crisis center at Soekarno-Hatta International Airport in Tangerang, Indonesia Monday, Oct. 29, 2018. A Lion Air flight crashed into the sea just minutes after taking off from Indonesia's capital on Monday in a blow to the country's aviation safety record after the lifting of bans on its airlines by the European Union and U.S. (AP Photo/Tatan Syuflana)
Relatives comfort each other at the crisis center at Soekarno-Hatta International Airport in Cengkareng, Jakarta, Indonesia, on Monday, Oct. 29, 2018. A Boeing Co. 737 Max jet, operated by Indonesia's Lion Air, crashed in the Java Sea with 189 people on board, making it the model's first accident and potentially the worst commercial aviation disaster in three years. Photographer: Rony Zakaria/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Search and rescue team members look at debris recovered from the crash site on the dockside at Tanjung Priok Port in Jakarta, Indonesia, on Monday, Oct. 29, 2018. A Boeing Co. 737 Max jet, operated by Indonesia's Lion Air, crashed in the Java Sea with 189 people on board, making it the model's first accident and potentially the worst commercial aviation disaster in three years. Photographer: Rony Zakaria/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Search and rescue team members carry a body recovered from the crash on the dockside at Tanjung Priok Port in Jakarta, Indonesia, on Monday, Oct. 29, 2018. A Boeing Co. 737 Max jet, operated by Indonesia's Lion Air, crashed in the Java Sea with 189 people on board, making it the model's first accident and potentially the worst commercial aviation disaster in three years. Photographer: Rony Zakaria/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Debris recovered from the crash site sits on the dockside at Tanjung Priok Port in Jakarta, Indonesia, on Monday, Oct. 29, 2018. A Boeing Co. 737 Max jet, operated by Indonesia's Lion Air, crashed in the Java Sea with 189 people on board, making it the model's first accident and potentially the worst commercial aviation disaster in three years. Photographer: Rony Zakaria/Bloomberg via Getty Images
An undergarment believed to belong to a passenger on board the ill-fated Lion Air flight JT 610 floats at sea in the waters north of Karawang, West Java province, on October 29, 2018. - All 189 passengers and crew aboard a crashed Indonesian Lion Air jet were 'likely' killed in the accident, the search and rescue agency said on October 29, as it announced it had found human remains. (Photo by ADEK BERRY / AFP) (Photo credit should read ADEK BERRY/AFP/Getty Images)
An Indonesian boatman takes pictures as debris from the ill-fated Lion Air flight JT 610 floats at sea in the waters north of Karawang, West Java province, on October 29, 2018. - All 189 passengers and crew aboard a crashed Indonesian Lion Air jet were 'likely' killed in the accident, the search and rescue agency said on October 29, as it announced it had found human remains. (Photo by ADEK BERRY / AFP) (Photo credit should read ADEK BERRY/AFP/Getty Images)
A boat sails in the background as debris from the ill-fated Lion Air flight JT 610 floats at sea in the waters north of Karawang, West Java province, on October 29, 2018. - All 189 passengers and crew aboard a crashed Indonesian Lion Air jet were 'likely' killed in the accident, the search and rescue agency said on October 29, as it announced it had found human remains. (Photo by ADEK BERRY / AFP) (Photo credit should read ADEK BERRY/AFP/Getty Images)
A shoe believed to belong to a passenger on board the ill-fated Lion Air flight JT 610 floats at sea in the waters north of Karawang, West Java province, on October 29, 2018. - All 189 passengers and crew aboard a crashed Indonesian Lion Air jet were 'likely' killed in the accident, the search and rescue agency said on October 29, as it announced it had found human remains. (Photo by ADEK BERRY / AFP) (Photo credit should read ADEK BERRY/AFP/Getty Images)
Rescue personnel transfer a bag containing human remains into an ambulance at port in Tanjung Priok, North Jakarta, on October 29, 2018, after being recovered at sea following the crash of Lion Air flight JT 610. - All 189 passengers and crew aboard a crashed Indonesian Lion Air jet were 'likely' killed in the accident, the search and rescue agency said on October 29, as it announced it had found human remains. (Photo by RESMI MALAU / AFP) (Photo credit should read RESMI MALAU/AFP/Getty Images)
JAKARTA, INDONESIA - OCTOBER 29 : Members of a rescue team bring personal items and wreckage ashore at the port in Tanjung Priok, North Jakarta, Indonesia on October 29, 2018, after they were recovered from the sea where Lion Air flight JT 610 crashed off the north coast earlier in the day. - A brand new Indonesian Lion Air plane carrying 189 passengers and crew crashed into the sea on October 29, officials said, moments after it had asked to be allowed to return to Jakarta. (Photo credit should read Jepayona Delita / Barcroft Media via Getty Images)
JAKARTA, INDONESIA - OCTOBER 29 : Members of a rescue team bring personal items and wreckage ashore at the port in Tanjung Priok, North Jakarta, Indonesia on October 29, 2018, after they were recovered from the sea where Lion Air flight JT 610 crashed off the north coast earlier in the day. - A brand new Indonesian Lion Air plane carrying 189 passengers and crew crashed into the sea on October 29, officials said, moments after it had asked to be allowed to return to Jakarta. (Photo credit should read Jepayona Delita / Barcroft Media via Getty Images)
A wallet belonging to a passenger of the ill-fated Lion Air flight JT 610 floats at sea in the waters north of Karawang, West Java province, on October 29, 2018. - All 189 passengers and crew aboard a crashed Indonesian Lion Air jet were 'likely' killed in the accident, the search and rescue agency said on October 29, as it announced it had found human remains. (Photo by ARIF ARIADI / AFP) (Photo credit should read ARIF ARIADI/AFP/Getty Images)
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Flight JT 610 crashed into the Java Sea about 13 minutes after taking off from Jakarta's Soekarno-Hatta International Airport. Indonesia's National Transportation Safety Committee reported that there were 178 adult passengers, one child, two infants, two pilots and six cabin crew on board.

No one is predicted to have survived the wreck "based on body parts found so far," according to search and rescue agency operational director Bambang Suryo Aji.

Following the deadly crash, accounts began to emerge of serious issues that occurred during the doomed jet's previous flight, including rapid descents that terrified passengers.

Passenger Alon Soetanto told TVOne that during his Lion Air flight from Bali, Indonesia, to Jakarta on Sunday, the plane suddenly dropped several times in the first few minutes of the flight.

"We felt like in a roller coaster," he told the station. "Some passengers began to panic and vomit."

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