Pipe bomb suspect built devices in his van, sources say

 

Multiple senior law enforcement officials briefed on the investigation into the pipe bombs allegedly built by Cesar Sayoc tell NBC News they believe the devices were constructed in his van.

As NBC News reported Friday, the Florida man lived in his vehicle — it appears to be a 1990s Dodge Ram Van — which was covered in pro-Trump images and right-wing propaganda.

Law enforcement officials continue to believe that Sayoc, 56, acted alone, but the investigation is ongoing. On Friday, the FBI said they had him in custody.

Sayoc is accused of sending 14 bombs through the U.S. Mail to President Barack Obama, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, ex-Vice President Biden, Democratic Party backer George Soros, actor Robert De Niro and others.

Most of the targets, including CNN, are also frequent targets of presidential tongue lashings on twitter and at political rallies.

Committee to Protect Journalists deputy executive director Robert Mahoney called on Trump to tone down his criticism.

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Explosive packages, items sent to politicians, news outlets
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Explosive packages, items sent to politicians, news outlets
A member of the FBI Weapons of Mass Destruction team works outside the Time Warner Center, in New York, Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2018. A police bomb squad was sent to CNN's offices in New York City and the newsroom was evacuated because of a suspicious package. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)
People gather outside the Time Warner Center, in New York, Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2018. A police bomb squad was sent to CNN's offices in New York City and the newsroom was evacuated because of a suspicious package. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)
New York City Police Dept. officers arrive outside the Time Warner Center, in New York, Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2018. A police bomb squad was sent to CNN's offices in New York City and the newsroom was evacuated because of a suspicious package. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)
Officers with the Uniform Division of the United States Secret Service talk at a checkpoint near the home of President Barack Obama, Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2018, in Washington. The U.S. Secret Service says agents have intercepted packages containing "possible explosive devices" addressed to former President Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
Broward County Sheriffs Office bomb device works outside the office of Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, D-Fla., Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2018 in Sunrise, Fla. The FBI confirms a 'suspicious package' went to Schultz's office in Sunrise, Fla. (AP Photo/Joshua Replogle)
An officer with the Uniform Division of the United States Secret Service uses his dog to search a checkpoint near the home of President Barack Obama, Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2018, in Washington. The U.S. Secret Service says agents have intercepted packages containing "possible explosive devices" addressed to former President Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
NYPD Deputy Commissioner of Intelligence & Counterterrorism John Miller, center, arrives outside Time Warner Center on Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2018, in New York. Law enforcement officials say a suspicious package that prompted an evacuation of CNN's offices is believed to contain a pipe bomb. (AP Photo/Kevin Hagen)
An officer with the Uniform Division of the United States Secret Service sits in his car as news media work at a checkpoint near the home of President Barack Obama, Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2018, in Washington. The U.S. Secret Service says agents have intercepted packages containing "possible explosive devices" addressed to former President Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
Police officers stand in front of property owned by former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and former President Bill Clinton in Chappaqua, N.Y., Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2018. A U.S. official says a "functional explosive device" was found at the Clinton's suburban New York home. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
Police officers stand in front of property owned by former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and former President Bill Clinton in Chappaqua, N.Y., Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2018. A U.S. official says a "functional explosive device" was found at the Clinton's suburban New York home. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
An officer with the Uniform Division of the United States Secret Service uses his dog to search a checkpoint near the home of President Barack Obama, Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2018, in Washington. The U.S. Secret Service says agents have intercepted packages containing "possible explosive devices" addressed to former President Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
A police car is parked in front of property owned by Hillary and Bill Clinton in Chappaqua, N.Y., Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2018. A U.S. official says a "functional explosive device" was found at the Clinton's suburban New York home. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
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"Journalists across the country feel unsafe because of the constant hostility and belittling of their role in our democracy by the head of state," he said in a statement. "It needs to stop."

The packages turned up between Monday and Friday in New York, California and Washington. A fingerprint from a package sent to U.S. Rep. Maxine Waters (D-Calif.) led authorities to Sayoc, FBI Director Christopher Wray said at a press conference on Friday.

Multiple senior law enforcement sources told NBC News that Sayoc denies being behind the package bomb campaign.

Sayoc, described by relative as a former strip club dancer and bouncer, has a record of past run-ins with the law, including over issues such as domestic violence, possession of steroids, battery and theft, according to court documents.

Sayoc faces multiple federal allegations, including making "threats against former presidents," in connection with the package bomb campaign. If convicted, the counts could bring 48 years behind bars.

Sayoc's first appearance in federal court was scheduled for Monday in Miami.

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