Texas high school students now required to watch police interaction video before they can graduate 

Many states around the country are exploring ways to reduce tensions between police and citizens in the wake of recent police shootings. And through the Community Safety Education Act, Texas has come up with a creative one.

The bill signed into law last year “requires any student entering ninth grade in the 2018-2019 academic year and thereafter to participate in a class and watch a video instruction on how to interact properly with officers during traffic stops,” according to the Washington Post.

For students failing to fulfill that requirement means no diplomas.

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WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 13: Law enforcement officers hold candles during a candlelight vigil marking National Police Week on May 13, 2018 in Washington, D.C. (Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)
U.S. President Donald Trump hugs Adrianna Valoy, the mother of slain New York City police Detective Miosotis Familia, during the 37th Annual National Peace Officers? Memorial Service at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S., May 15, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
UNITED STATES - MAY 14: Members of the Boca Raton Police Department wait to participate in a competition near the Capitol Reflecting Pool that was part of National Police Week on May 14, 2018. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
A police officer from Arizona salutes at the 37th Annual National Peace Officers? Memorial Service at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S., May 15, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 13: Law enforcement officers hold candles during a candlelight vigil marking National Police Week on May 13, 2018 in Washington, D.C. (Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - MAY 14: From left, Drum Major Ken Misch, Drum Sgt. Charlie Ezelle, Roberto 'Boom Boom' Lopez, and Sgt. Michael Apodaca, of the Los Angeles Police Emerald Society Pipes and Drums, smoke cigars near the Capitol Reflection Pool after participating in a competition that was part of National Police Week on May 14, 2018. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 13: Law enforcement officers hold candles during a candlelight vigil marking National Police Week on May 13, 2018 in Washington, D.C. (Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 13: U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions delivers remarks during a candlelight vigil marking National Police Week on May 13, 2018 in Washington, D.C. (Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 13: Law enforcement officers, family members and other guests hold candles during a candlelight vigil marking National Police Week on May 13, 2018 in Washington, D.C. (Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 13: Members of the United States Park Police Honor Guard are pictured during a candlelight vigil marking National Police Week on May 13, 2018 in Washington, D.C. (Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 13: The U.S. Capitol Building is pictured during a candlelight vigil marking National Police Week on May 13, 2018 in Washington, D.C. (Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)
U.S. President Donald Trump gives remarks at the 37th Annual National Peace Officers? Memorial Service at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S., May 15, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 13: Law enforcement officers, family members, and other guests hold candles during a candlelight vigil marking National Police Week on May 13, 2018 in Washington, D.C. (Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 01: Cardinal Donald Wuerl, the Archbishop of Washington, greets police officers ourside St. Patrick's Catholic Church prior to the 24th annual 'Blue Mass' May 1, 2018 in Washington, DC. The annual mass is held at the beginning of National Police Week for those in law enforcement and fire safety, remembering those who have fallen, and supporting those who serve. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 01: Members of law enforcement take communion in St. Patrick's Catholic Church during the 24th annual 'Blue Mass' May 1, 2018 in Washington, DC. The annual mass is held at the beginning of National Police Week for those in law enforcement and fire safety, remembering those who have fallen, and supporting those who serve. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 01: Members of a law enforcement honor guard team march into St. Patrick's Catholic Church for the 24th annual 'Blue Mass' May 1, 2018 in Washington, DC. The annual mass is held at the beginning of National Police Week for those in law enforcement and fire safety, remembering those who have fallen, and supporting those who serve. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 01: U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions (2nd R), Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein (C) and FBI Director Christoper Wray (2nd L) attend the 24th annual 'Blue Mass' at St. Patrick's Catholic Church May 1, 2018 in Washington, DC. The annual mass is held at the beginning of National Police Week for those in law enforcement and fire safety, remembering those who have fallen, and supporting those who serve. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 13: A member of the U.S. Park Police Honor Guard salutes during a candlelight vigil marking National Police Week on May 13, 2018 in Washington, D.C. (Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)
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The 16-minute video walks through how drivers should respond to officers during a traffic stop.

The bulk of the “video shows a re-enactment of students being pulled over for speeding and the officers explaining to them what to do next,” notes CNN. “The re-enactment is followed by different students asking questions about what to do if they have to deal with law enforcement, with officers answering those questions.”

The new curriculum inclusion has received mixed reviews, with some calling for cops to be better trained.

“Why not just train those cops properly?” wrote one tweeter, and another stated, “maybe cops need new training so they know how to better handle situations where they have to pull people over.”

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