Hillary Clinton’s security clearance withdrawn at her request

The U.S. government has approved Hillary Clinton’s request to have her own security clearance withdrawn.

The move was revealed after Senate Judiciary Chairman Charles Grassley released a letter from the State Department, which states: “At her request, Secretary Clinton’s security clearance was administratively withdrawn on August 30, 2018.” 

It goes on to say that on September 20, clearances were withdrawn for Cheryl Mills and four others who “had been granted access to classified information through a request made by Secretary Clinton designating them as researchers.”

The letter ends by asking Grassley’s office not to release the contents of it to the public, but according to ABC News, it is uncertain why they did so.

However, the outlet has pointed out that Clinton’s spokesperson Nick Merrill blasted the disclosure, tweeting in a series Friday that she submitted the request “quietly so as to not allow Trump to use our national security for partisan purposes yet again. Because that’s what was in the best interest of the country. Sure enough, 6 weeks later Senator Grassley, king among partisans, released a letter, again playing politics with our national security. It’s a disgrace.”

“Clinton in 2016 was investigated for her use of a private email server during her tenure as secretary of state. No charges were filed against Clinton, who was running for president at the time of the probe,” notes Politico.

RELATED: Never-before-seen pictures of Hillary Clinton 

7 PHOTOS
Never-before-seen photos of First Lady Hillary Clinton released in book
See Gallery
Never-before-seen photos of First Lady Hillary Clinton released in book
(Photo by Robert McNeely via Briscoe Center for American History at the University of Texas at Austin)
(Photo by Robert McNeely via Briscoe Center for American History at the University of Texas at Austin)
(Photo by Robert McNeely via Briscoe Center for American History at the University of Texas at Austin)
(Photo by Robert McNeely via Briscoe Center for American History at the University of Texas at Austin)
(Photo by Robert McNeely via Briscoe Center for American History at the University of Texas at Austin)
(Photo by Robert McNeely via Briscoe Center for American History at the University of Texas at Austin)
(Photo by Robert McNeely via Briscoe Center for American History at the University of Texas at Austin)
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

 

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.