FBI chief says usual process met in Kavanaugh probe

FBI Director Chris Wray says the FBI's background investigation of new Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh was limited in scope but that the "usual process was followed."

Wray is facing questions about the background investigation during a Senate committee hearing Wednesday.

He says that unlike in criminal investigations, the FBI's authority and scope for background checks is determined by the agency that requested it — the White House in this case.

Wray says the probe into Kavanaugh's past was limited in scope but that the investigation followed the "standard process for such investigations going back a long ways."

Wray declined to answer a question from Sen. Kamala Harris, a California Democrat, about whether the FBI had investigated whether Kavanaugh had lied to Congress under oath.

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Brett Kavanaugh's ceremonial swearing-in event at White House
U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh is congratulated by retired Justice Anthony Kennedy, as his wife Ashley and daughters Liza and Margaret, and President Donald Trump look on during his ceremonial public swearing-in at the East Room of the White House in Washington, U.S., October 8, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh participates in a ceremonial public swearing-in with U.S. President Donald Trump in the East Room of the White House in Washington, U.S., October 8, 2018. REUTERS/Jim Bourg
U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh speaks during his ceremonial public swearing-in, in the East Room of the White House in Washington, U.S., October 8, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh takes his ceremonial oath as he participates in a ceremonial public swearing-in in the East Room of the White House in Washington, U.S., October 8, 2018. REUTERS/Jim Bourg
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks next to U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh as they participate in a ceremonial public swearing-in in the East Room of the White House in Washington, U.S., October 8, 2018. REUTERS/Jim Bourg
Deputy Attorney General Rob Rosentein watches from the back from the room before U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh's ceremonial public swearing-in at the East Room of the White House in Washington, U.S., October 8, 2018. REUTERS/Jim Bourg
U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh takes his oath during his ceremonial public swearing-in as U.S. President Donald Trump and Kavanaugh's daughters Liza and Margaret look on in the East Room of the White House in Washington, U.S., October 8, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh hugs his wife Ashley as he participates in a ceremonial public swearing-in with U.S. President Donald Trump in the East Room of the White House in Washington, U.S., October 8, 2018. REUTERS/Jim Bourg
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks next to U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh and retired Supreme Court Associate Justice Anthony Kennedy as they participate in a ceremonial public swearing-in in the East Room of the White House in Washington, U.S., October 8, 2018. REUTERS/Jim Bourg
U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh speaks as he participates in a ceremonial public swearing-in with U.S. President Donald Trump while Kavanaugh's wife Ashley and daughters Liza and Margaret look on in the East Room of the White House in Washington, U.S., October 8, 2018. REUTERS/Jim Bourg
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