In wild conspiracy, Trump claims protesters of Kavanaugh are 'paid for by Soros'

President Donald Trump on Friday tweeted a baseless conspiracy theory, in which he claimed the sexual assault victims who are protesting against Brett Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court nomination on Capitol Hill are actually paid protesters bankrolled by George Soros, a Jewish billionaire who donates to Democratic causes.

“The very rude elevator screamers are paid professionals only looking to make Senators look bad,” Trump tweeted. “Don’t fall for it! Also, look at all of the professionally made identical signs. Paid for by Soros and others. These are not signs made in the basement from love! #Troublemakers.”

Trump is referring to sexual assault victims who have confronted senators on Capitol Hill, including Sens. Jeff Flake of Arizona and Orrin Hatch of Utah.

Flake, for his part, listened to the survivors who confronted him on Capitol Hill last week. But Hatch was dismissive, telling a group of women survivors to “grow up” in a testy exchange Thursday near an elevator in the Capitol complex.

27 PHOTOS
Protests against Brett Kavanaugh
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Protests against Brett Kavanaugh
Activists hold a protest and rally in opposition to U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh outside the court in Washington, U.S., October 4, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Activists rally inside the Senate Hart Office Building during a protest in opposition to U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and in support for Christine Blasey Ford, the university professor who has accused Kavanaugh of sexual assault in 1982, on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., October 4, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Activists hold a protest and rally in opposition to U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh in Washington, U.S., October 4, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
A woman thrusts her fist in support of activists rallying inside the Senate Hart Office Building during a protest in opposition to U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and in support of Christine Blasey Ford, the university professor who has accused Kavanaugh of sexual assault in 1982, on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., October 4, 2018. REUTERS//Mary F. Calvert
Activists protest and rally in opposition to U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh outside the court in Washington, U.S., October 4, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Protesters demonstrate against Judge Brett Kavanaugh's nomination to the U.S. Supreme Court in the atrium of the Hart Senate Office Building in Washington, U.S., October 4, 2018. REUTERS/Mary F. Calvert TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Activists hold a protest and rally in opposition to U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and in support for Christine Blasey Ford, the university professor who has accused Kavanaugh of sexual assault in 1982, in Washington, U.S., October 4, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
A demonstrator sits on the ground during a protest and rally in opposition to U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh in Washington, U.S., October 4, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Workers and onlookers watch as activists rally inside the Senate Hart Office Building during a protest in opposition to U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and in support for Christine Blasey Ford, the university professor who has accused Kavanaugh of sexual assault in 1982, on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., October 4, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Activists rally inside the Senate Hart Office Building during a protest in opposition to U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., October 4, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Activists hold a protest and rally in opposition to U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh in Washington, U.S., October 4, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Activists rally inside the Senate Hart Office Building during a protest in opposition to U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and in support for Christine Blasey Ford, the university professor who has accused Kavanaugh of sexual assault in 1982, on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., October 4, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Activists hold a protest and rally in opposition to U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh in Washington, U.S., October 4, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Activists hold a protest march and rally in opposition to U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh near the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S., October 4, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Activists protest and rally in opposition to U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh outside the court in Washington, U.S., October 4, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Activists march during a rally in opposition to U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh in Washington, U.S., October 4, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 04: Demonstrators wait in-line to enter Hart Senate Office Building for a protest against the confirmation of Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh October 4, 2018 at the Hart Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. Senators had an opportunity to review a new FBI background investigation into accusations of sexual assault against Kavanaugh and Republican leaders are moving to have a vote on his confirmation this weekend. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Protesters occupy the Senate Hart building during a rally against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC on October 4, 2018. - Top Republicans voiced confidence Thursday that Brett Kavanaugh will be confirmed to the US Supreme Court this weekend, as they asserted that an FBI probe had found nothing to support sex assault allegations against Donald Trump's nominee.'Judge Kavanaugh should be confirmed on Saturday,' Senator Chuck Grassley of Iowa, the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, told reporters. (Photo by ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS / AFP) (Photo credit should read ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP/Getty Images)
A protester holds up a sign in the Senate Hart building during a rally against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC on October 4, 2018. - Top Republicans voiced confidence Thursday that Brett Kavanaugh will be confirmed to the US Supreme Court this weekend, as they asserted that an FBI probe had found nothing to support sex assault allegations against Donald Trump's nominee.'Judge Kavanaugh should be confirmed on Saturday,' Senator Chuck Grassley of Iowa, the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, told reporters. (Photo by ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS / AFP) (Photo credit should read ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 04: Protesters chant their support for fellow demonstrators who are being arrested by U.S. Capitol Police for protesting against the confirmation of Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh in the atrium of the Hart Senate Office Building October 4, 2018 in Washington, DC. Senators had an opportunity to review a new FBI background investigation into accusations of sexual assault against Kavanaugh and Republican leaders are moving to have a vote on his confirmation this weekend. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 04: (L to R) Bob Bland, Co-President, Women's March; model and actress Emily Ratajkowski and actress and comedian Amy Schumer attend the Brett Kavanaugh U.S. Supreme Court Confirmation Protest in front of the Supreme Court on October 4, 2018 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Paul Morigi/WireImage)
A protester opposed to Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh holds a sign outside the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Oct. 4, 2018. Senate Republicans pushed toward a make-or-break test vote on Kavanaugh as key GOP holdouts Jeff Flake and Susan Collins said an FBI investigation prompted by sexual misconduct allegations against him appeared to be thorough. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Demonstrators protest US Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh in front of the Supreme Court on October 4, 2018 in Washington, DC. - A new FBI investigation into Kavanaugh found nothing to corroborate sexual assault allegations against US President Donald Trump's nominee for the Supreme Court, US Senator Chuck Grassley of Iowa said Thursday. (Photo by NICHOLAS KAMM / AFP) (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
Demonstrators protest US Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh near the US Capitol on October 4, 2018 in Washington, DC. - A new FBI investigation into Kavanaugh found nothing to corroborate sexual assault allegations against US President Donald Trump's nominee for the Supreme Court, US Senator Chuck Grassley of Iowa said Thursday. (Photo by Jim WATSON / AFP) (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
Demonstrators protest US Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh in front of the Supreme Court on October 4, 2018 in Washington, DC. - A new FBI investigation into Kavanaugh found nothing to corroborate sexual assault allegations against US President Donald Trump's nominee for the Supreme Court, US Senator Chuck Grassley of Iowa said Thursday. (Photo by NICHOLAS KAMM / AFP) (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
Demonstrators protest US Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh in front of the Supreme Court on October 4, 2018 in Washington, DC. - A new FBI investigation into Kavanaugh found nothing to corroborate sexual assault allegations against US President Donald Trump's nominee for the Supreme Court, US Senator Chuck Grassley of Iowa said Thursday. (Photo by NICHOLAS KAMM / AFP) (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
Demonstrators protest US Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh in front of the Supreme Court on October 4, 2018 in Washington, DC. - A new FBI investigation into Kavanaugh found nothing to corroborate sexual assault allegations against US President Donald Trump's nominee for the Supreme Court, US Senator Chuck Grassley of Iowa said Thursday. (Photo by NICHOLAS KAMM / AFP) (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
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“Why aren’t you brave enough to talk to us and exchange with us?” a female protester asks Hatch, who is waiting for an elevator.

“Don’t you wave your hand at me,” the protester continues. “I waved my hand at you.”

“When you grow up I’ll be glad to talk to you,” Hatch then says as he gets onto the elevator.

Trump’s claim that Soros is bankrolling the protesters is a baseless conspiracy theory that the far right has glommed onto in the Trump era.

Far right agitators claim Soros is a Nazi, a ridiculous conspiracy given that Soros and his family survived the Holocaust.

And Republicans — including the president’s own son, Donald Trump Jr. — like to dismiss real protests as Astroturf gatherings paid for by Soros.

“The well ORGANIZED effort by Florida school students demanding gun control has GEORGE SOROS’ FINGERPRINTS all over it,” former Milwaukee County sheriff and Trump supporter David A. Clarke Jr., tweeted back in February. “It is similar to how he hijacked and exploited black people’s emotion regarding police use of force incidents into the COP HATING Black Lives Matter movement.”

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29 PHOTOS
Billionaire George Soros
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Billionaire George Soros
George Soros, billionaire and founder of Soros Fund Management LLC, speaks at an event on day three of the World Economic Forum (WEF) in Davos, Switzerland, on Thursday, Jan. 25, 2018. World leaders, influential executives, bankers and policy makers attend the 48th annual meeting of the World Economic Forum in Davos from Jan. 23 - 26. Photographer: Simon Dawson/Bloomberg via Getty Images
George Soros, billionaire and founder of Soros Fund Management LLC, speaks to an attendee on day three of the World Economic Forum (WEF) in Davos, Switzerland, on Thursday, Jan. 25, 2018. World leaders, influential executives, bankers and policy makers attend the 48th annual meeting of the World Economic Forum in Davos from Jan. 23 - 26. Photographer: Simon Dawson/Bloomberg via Getty Images
George Soros, billionaire and founder of Soros Fund Management LLC, attends an event on day three of the World Economic Forum (WEF) in Davos, Switzerland, on Thursday, Jan. 25, 2018. World leaders, influential executives, bankers and policy makers attend the 48th annual meeting of the World Economic Forum in Davos from Jan. 23 - 26. Photographer: Simon Dawson/Bloomberg via Getty Images
BERLIN, GERMANY - JUNE 08: Financier and philanthropist George Soros (R) and German State Secretary for Europe at the German Foreign Ministry Michael Roth (L) attend the official opening of the European Roma Institute for Arts and Culture (ERIAC) at the German Foreign Ministry on June 8, 2017 in Berlin, Germany. The Institute, which is an initiative of the European Council, the Open Society Fund and the Alliance for the European Roma Institute for Arts and Culture, will have an administrative office in Berlin, gallery space in Venice and a liaison office in Brussels. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)
BERLIN, GERMANY - JUNE 08: Financier and philanthropist George Soros (L) and his wife Tamiko Bolton (C) attend the official opening of the European Roma Institute for Arts and Culture (ERIAC) at the German Foreign Ministry on June 8, 2017 in Berlin, Germany. The Institute, which is an initiative of the European Council, the Open Society Fund and the Alliance for the European Roma Institute for Arts and Culture, will have an administrative office in Berlin, gallery space in Venice and a liaison office in Brussels. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)
EU commission President Jean-Claude Juncker (L) welcomes George Soros, Founder and Chairman of the Open Society Foundations prior to a meeting in Brussels, on April 27, 2017. Meeting will mainly focus on situation in Hungary, including legislative measures that could force the closure of the Central European University in Budapest. / AFP PHOTO / POOL / OLIVIER HOSLET (Photo credit should read OLIVIER HOSLET/AFP/Getty Images)
Georges Soros, Chairman of Soros Fund Management, attends the annual conference of the Institute for New Economic Thinking (INET) at the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) headquarters in Paris April 9, 2015. REUTERS/Charles Platiau/File Photo
Argentina's President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner talks to George Soros, chairman of Soros Fund Management LLC, during a meeting in New York September 22, 2014. Kirchner met on Monday with Argentina bondholder and billionaire financier Soros, who is suing a U.S. bank caught in the middle of the country's latest default. A spokesman for Soros said they had discussed topics including the energy sector. Picture taken September 22, 2014. REUTERS/Argentine Presidency/Handout via Reuters (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS) ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS PICTURE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. REUTERS IS UNABLE TO INDEPENDENTLY VERIFY THE AUTHENTICITY, CONTENT, LOCATION OR DATE OF THIS IMAGE. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS. THIS PICTURE IS DISTRIBUTED EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
George Soros, Chairman of Soros Fund Management LLC (L) and U.S. Senator John McCain talk during a break between sessions at the annual meeting of the World Economic Forum (WEF) in Davos January 23, 2014. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse (SWITZERLAND - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS)
Business magnate George Soros arrives to speak at the Open Russia Club in London, Britain June 20, 2016. REUTERS/Luke MacGregor
Billionaire investor George Soros (L) and former South African President F.W. de Klerk attend the Fortune Forum Summit in London December 4, 2012. REUTERS/Luke MacGregor (BRITAIN - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS)
Billionaire investor George Soros and girlfriend Tamiko Bolton are pictured at Soros' residence in Southampton, New York August 11, 2012. Soros had a lot to celebrate on Saturday evening: his 82nd birthday and the engagement to his much younger girlfriend Tamiko Bolton. Soros and Bolton, who met in spring in 2008, formally announced their engagement at a party at Soro's summer home in Southampton, N.Y. attended by a small group of friends and relatives, according to a person familiar with the trader. REUTERS/Myrna Suarez/Handout (UNITED STATES - Tags: PROFILE SOCIETY BUSINESS PORTRAIT) FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS. THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. IT IS DISTRIBUTED, EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS ATTENTION EDITORS THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN BINNED
African National Congress President Nelson Mandela meets with American billionaire George Soros at ANC headquarters in Johannesburg, South Africa April 5, 1993 . Reuters/Juda Ngwenya (SOUTH AFRICA) BEST QUALITY AVAILABLE
Soros Fund Management Chairman George Soros speaks during a news conference at the World Economic Forum (WEF) in Davos, January 25, 2012. REUTERS/Arnd Wiegmann (SWITZERLAND - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS HEADSHOT)
Financier George Soros waits to begin an interview at the UN Climate Change Conference 2009 in Copenhagen December 10, 2009. REUTERS/Bob Strong (DENMARK ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS)
George Soros, Chairman of Soros Fund Management, listens to economists speaking at the Emerging from the Financial Crisis annual conference, held at Columbia University, in New York, February 20, 2009. REUTERS/Chip East (UNITED STATES)
Hedge fund manager George Soros, chairman of Soros Fund Management LLC, listens to testimony before a U.S. House Oversight and Government Reform Committee hearing on the regulation of hedge funds, on Capitol Hill in Washington November 13, 2008. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES)
Billionaire financier and philanthropist George Soros meets the organizers of a training centre for single mothers sponsored by his Open Society Institute in Dakar, February 5, 2008. Hungry for oil and minerals, India and China have become Africa's new colonialists, exploiting the world's poorest continent in the same way as its old European masters, Soros said on Tuesday. REUTERS/Daniel Flynn (SENEGAL)
Carla Del Ponte (R), chief prosecutor of the International Criminal Tribunal of the former Yugoslavia, receives the CEU Open Society Prize from Hungarian-born billionaire George Soros at the Central European University in Budapest June 14, 2007. REUTERS/Karoly Arvai (HUNGARY)
Former Malaysian prime minister Mahathir Mohamad (L) talks as George Soros listens during a news conference at the end of their meeting in Kuala Lumpur December 15, 2006. REUTERS/Bazuki Muhammad (MALAYSIA)
US financier George Soros listens to a joint news conference with Austrian Chancellor Schuessel in Vienna. U.S. billionaire financier George Soros (R) listens during a joint news conference with Austrian Chancellor Wolfgang Schuessel (L) in Vienna June 20, 2005. The Austrian government presented the 'Open Medical Institute', a post-graduate programme for qualified doctors from middle and eastern Europe, sponsored by Soros' Open Society Institute on Monday. REUTERS/Heinz-Peter Bader
Investor/philanthropist George Soros gives an address on "The Crisis of Global Capitalism: Open Society Endangered" October 5 at the Omni Shoram Hotel in Washington. Soros said he expected top industrial nations to agree on coordinated rate cuts, but cautioned that this alone was not enough to stem the world financial crisis.
United States First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, U.S. Ambassador to Haiti Tim Carney (L), international financier and philanthropist George Soros (C) and Well-Being Hospital of Pignon, Haiti Director Dr. Guy Theodore (R) talk to a group of women entrepreneurs in Pignon, November 22. The women have received funding help from a microcredit program affiliated with hospital, which has received major funding from Soros' charitable foundation. JRB/HB/JDP
HUngarian-born multi-millionaire George Soros (R) shakes hands with Croatian President Stjepan Mesic before their meeting in Zagreb March 7. Soros came to Zagreb on an official two-day visit to Croatia. HP
George Soros, Chairman of the Soros Fund Management, attends a press conference at the World Economic Forum?s annual meeting in Davos January 31. Soros is amongst around 3000 political and financial leaders and personalities to take part in conference which lasts until February 3. WORLD ECONOMIC FORUM
U.S. financier George Soros gestures during a news conference, October 20. Soros said he would spend up to 500 million dollars in the next three years in Russia trying to improve health care, expand educational opportunities and train military workers for civilian jobs. RUSSIA
Investment banker George Soros working on phone in office. (Photo by Ted Thai/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)
FRANCE - MAY 12: Close -up George Soros in Paris, France on May 12, 1993. (Photo by Daniel SIMON/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images)
FRANCE - MAY 12: Close -up George Soros in Paris, France on May 12, 1993. (Photo by Daniel SIMON/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images)
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