Senator Orrin Hatch tells Kavanaugh protesters to 'grow up'

As crowds of demonstrators occupied the Hart Senate Building in Washington, D.C., to protest the potential — and increasingly likely — confirmation of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) dismissed them with unkind words and a wave goodbye before ducking into an elevator.

The protesters, which included sexual assault survivors and their allies, marched from the E. Barrett Prettyman Federal Courthouse on Thursday to the Hart building, just two days before the Senate is scheduled to vote on whether to confirm Kavanaugh to the highest court in the nation. Kavanaugh, whose confirmation to the court could shift policy for a generation, has been accused by three women of sexual misconduct.

“Why aren’t you brave enough to talk to us and exchange with us?” an unidentified female demonstrator asked Hatch during the protest, as seen in a video clip. The Republican senator from Utah responded with a limp, dismissive wave at her.

“Don’t you wave your hand at me, I wave my hand at you,” she said.

“When you grow up, I’ll be glad to [speak to you],” Hatch responded from behind his security.

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Protests against Brett Kavanaugh
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Protests against Brett Kavanaugh
Activists hold a protest and rally in opposition to U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh outside the court in Washington, U.S., October 4, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Activists rally inside the Senate Hart Office Building during a protest in opposition to U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and in support for Christine Blasey Ford, the university professor who has accused Kavanaugh of sexual assault in 1982, on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., October 4, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Activists hold a protest and rally in opposition to U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh in Washington, U.S., October 4, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
A woman thrusts her fist in support of activists rallying inside the Senate Hart Office Building during a protest in opposition to U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and in support of Christine Blasey Ford, the university professor who has accused Kavanaugh of sexual assault in 1982, on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., October 4, 2018. REUTERS//Mary F. Calvert
Activists protest and rally in opposition to U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh outside the court in Washington, U.S., October 4, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Protesters demonstrate against Judge Brett Kavanaugh's nomination to the U.S. Supreme Court in the atrium of the Hart Senate Office Building in Washington, U.S., October 4, 2018. REUTERS/Mary F. Calvert TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Activists hold a protest and rally in opposition to U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and in support for Christine Blasey Ford, the university professor who has accused Kavanaugh of sexual assault in 1982, in Washington, U.S., October 4, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
A demonstrator sits on the ground during a protest and rally in opposition to U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh in Washington, U.S., October 4, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Workers and onlookers watch as activists rally inside the Senate Hart Office Building during a protest in opposition to U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and in support for Christine Blasey Ford, the university professor who has accused Kavanaugh of sexual assault in 1982, on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., October 4, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Activists rally inside the Senate Hart Office Building during a protest in opposition to U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., October 4, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Activists hold a protest and rally in opposition to U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh in Washington, U.S., October 4, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Activists rally inside the Senate Hart Office Building during a protest in opposition to U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and in support for Christine Blasey Ford, the university professor who has accused Kavanaugh of sexual assault in 1982, on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., October 4, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Activists hold a protest and rally in opposition to U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh in Washington, U.S., October 4, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Activists hold a protest march and rally in opposition to U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh near the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S., October 4, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Activists protest and rally in opposition to U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh outside the court in Washington, U.S., October 4, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Activists march during a rally in opposition to U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh in Washington, U.S., October 4, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 04: Demonstrators wait in-line to enter Hart Senate Office Building for a protest against the confirmation of Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh October 4, 2018 at the Hart Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. Senators had an opportunity to review a new FBI background investigation into accusations of sexual assault against Kavanaugh and Republican leaders are moving to have a vote on his confirmation this weekend. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Protesters occupy the Senate Hart building during a rally against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC on October 4, 2018. - Top Republicans voiced confidence Thursday that Brett Kavanaugh will be confirmed to the US Supreme Court this weekend, as they asserted that an FBI probe had found nothing to support sex assault allegations against Donald Trump's nominee.'Judge Kavanaugh should be confirmed on Saturday,' Senator Chuck Grassley of Iowa, the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, told reporters. (Photo by ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS / AFP) (Photo credit should read ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP/Getty Images)
A protester holds up a sign in the Senate Hart building during a rally against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC on October 4, 2018. - Top Republicans voiced confidence Thursday that Brett Kavanaugh will be confirmed to the US Supreme Court this weekend, as they asserted that an FBI probe had found nothing to support sex assault allegations against Donald Trump's nominee.'Judge Kavanaugh should be confirmed on Saturday,' Senator Chuck Grassley of Iowa, the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, told reporters. (Photo by ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS / AFP) (Photo credit should read ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 04: Protesters chant their support for fellow demonstrators who are being arrested by U.S. Capitol Police for protesting against the confirmation of Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh in the atrium of the Hart Senate Office Building October 4, 2018 in Washington, DC. Senators had an opportunity to review a new FBI background investigation into accusations of sexual assault against Kavanaugh and Republican leaders are moving to have a vote on his confirmation this weekend. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 04: (L to R) Bob Bland, Co-President, Women's March; model and actress Emily Ratajkowski and actress and comedian Amy Schumer attend the Brett Kavanaugh U.S. Supreme Court Confirmation Protest in front of the Supreme Court on October 4, 2018 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Paul Morigi/WireImage)
A protester opposed to Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh holds a sign outside the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Oct. 4, 2018. Senate Republicans pushed toward a make-or-break test vote on Kavanaugh as key GOP holdouts Jeff Flake and Susan Collins said an FBI investigation prompted by sexual misconduct allegations against him appeared to be thorough. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Demonstrators protest US Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh in front of the Supreme Court on October 4, 2018 in Washington, DC. - A new FBI investigation into Kavanaugh found nothing to corroborate sexual assault allegations against US President Donald Trump's nominee for the Supreme Court, US Senator Chuck Grassley of Iowa said Thursday. (Photo by NICHOLAS KAMM / AFP) (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
Demonstrators protest US Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh near the US Capitol on October 4, 2018 in Washington, DC. - A new FBI investigation into Kavanaugh found nothing to corroborate sexual assault allegations against US President Donald Trump's nominee for the Supreme Court, US Senator Chuck Grassley of Iowa said Thursday. (Photo by Jim WATSON / AFP) (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
Demonstrators protest US Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh in front of the Supreme Court on October 4, 2018 in Washington, DC. - A new FBI investigation into Kavanaugh found nothing to corroborate sexual assault allegations against US President Donald Trump's nominee for the Supreme Court, US Senator Chuck Grassley of Iowa said Thursday. (Photo by NICHOLAS KAMM / AFP) (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
Demonstrators protest US Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh in front of the Supreme Court on October 4, 2018 in Washington, DC. - A new FBI investigation into Kavanaugh found nothing to corroborate sexual assault allegations against US President Donald Trump's nominee for the Supreme Court, US Senator Chuck Grassley of Iowa said Thursday. (Photo by NICHOLAS KAMM / AFP) (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
Demonstrators protest US Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh in front of the Supreme Court on October 4, 2018 in Washington, DC. - A new FBI investigation into Kavanaugh found nothing to corroborate sexual assault allegations against US President Donald Trump's nominee for the Supreme Court, US Senator Chuck Grassley of Iowa said Thursday. (Photo by NICHOLAS KAMM / AFP) (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
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“How dare you talk to women that way? How dare you?” the woman replied. Hatch waved goodbye to the protesters as the elevator doors closed.

Christine Blasey Ford has accused Kavanaugh of holding her down on a bed, covering her mouth with his hand, and attempting to forcibly remove her clothes while the two were at a gathering in high school. An FBI investigation was opened last week in response to the allegation, but Ford’s lawyers said she was not interviewed by the intelligence agency.

Last week, Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) was asked by a rape survivor if he believed her.

“Senator Graham, I was raped 13 years ago,” survivor Robyn Swirling told him.

“I’m so sorry,” Graham responded.

“I don’t remember the exact date, but do you believe me?” Swirling asked.

“You needed to go to the cops,” Graham replied. “Go to the cops.”

18 PHOTOS
Sen. Orrin Hatch
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Sen. Orrin Hatch
Senate Finance Committee Chairman Orrin Hatch listens as U.S. President Donald Trump and his economic team meet with members committee at the White House in Washington, U.S., October 18, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
UNITED STATES - APRIL 16: Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, is interviewed by the press before the Senate policy luncheons in the Capitol. Hatch said he intends to support President Barack Obama's choice for federal appeals court in Washington, Sri Srinivasan. (Photo By Chris Maddaloni/CQ Roll Call)
U.S. Senators Joe Lieberman (D-CT), from left, Barak Obama (D-IL) and Orrin Hatch (R-UT) talk in the U.S. Capitol on the opening day of the legislative session on Thursday, January 4, 2006, in Washington, DC. (Photo by Chuck Kennedy/MCT/MCT via Getty Images)
US President Barack Obama embraces Massachusetts Senator Ted Kennedy before signing the Edward M. Kennedy Serve America Act at the SEED School in Washington, DC, on April 21, 2009. Standing alongside are Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi and Utah Senator Orrin Hatch. AFP PHOTO / Saul Loeb (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
U.S. Senators Orrin Hatch (R-UT) and Lamar Alexander (R-LA) await the start gather prior to an arrival ceremony for the casket of the late Rev. Billy Graham to lie in honor inside the Rotunda in Washington, U.S., February 28, 2018 REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. President Donald Trump celebrates with Senate Finance Committee Chairman Orrin Hatch (R-UT) and Congressional Republicans after the U.S. Congress passed sweeping tax overhaul legislation on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, U.S., December 20, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Chairman of the Senate Finance Committee Orrin Hatch (R-UT) greets Senator Chuck Grassley (R-IA) before Alex Azar II testifies on his nomination to be Health and Human Services secretary in Washington, U.S., January 9, 2018. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
U.S. President Donald Trump and Senator Orrin Hatch step from Air Force One upon arrival in Salt Lake City, Utah, U.S. December 4, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Senate Finance Committee Chairman Orrin Hatch (R-UT), R, listens to remarks from ranking member Ron Wyden (D-OR), L, during a markup on the "Tax Cuts and Jobs Act" on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., November 13, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Senate Finance Committee Chairman Orrin Hatch (R-UT) (C) attends a press conference accompanied by Sen. John Barasso (R-WY) (L) and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) following the Republicans weekly policy luncheon on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., November 28, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions greets Senator Orrin Hatch (R-UT) prior to testifying before a Senate Judiciary oversight hearing on the Justice Department on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., October 18, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
(L-R) Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-IA), Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, Sen. Orrin Hatch, Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin and Director of the National Economic Council Gary Cohn, introduce the Republican tax reform plan at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S., November 9, 2017. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein
Senator Orrin Hatch, a Republican from Utah, arrives before a Senate Finance Committee hearing in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, Feb. 14, 2018. U.S. Treasury secretary Steven Mnuchin�said the Internal Revenue Service will issue guidance within the next two weeks to prevent hedge-fund managers from dodging new tax rules on carried-interest profits. Photographer: Zach Gibson/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Senator Orrin Hatch, a Republican from Utah, speaks during a tax bill passage event with U.S. President Donald Trump, left, and Republican congressional members of the House and Senate on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, Dec. 20, 2017. House Republicans passed the most extensive rewrite of the U.S. tax code in more than 30 years, hours after the Senate passed the legislation, handing Trump his first major legislative victory. Photographer: Zach Gibson/Bloomberg via Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 28: (L-R) Sen. John Barrasso (R-WY), Senate Finance Committee Chairman Orrin Hatch (R-UT), Sen. John Thune (R-SD) and Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn (R-TX) talk with reporters following the weekly Senate Republican Policy Committee luncheon in the U.S. Capitol November 28, 2017 in Washington, DC. Republicans in the Senate hope to pass their tax cut legislation this week and work with the House of Representatives to get a bill to President Donald Trump before Christmas. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Senator Orrin Hatch, a Republican from Utah and chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, speaks to members of the media after a weekly GOP luncheon meeting at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2017. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said GOP members are optimistic that including the repeal of the individual mandate imposed by the Obamacare law in a tax overhaul would be helpful. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 09: U.S. Secretary of the Treasury Steven Mnuchin (R) listens to Chairman of Senate Finance Committee Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-UT) (L) during a meeting with members of the Senate Finance Committee November 9, 2017 at the Capitol in Washington, DC. Senate Republicans unveiled their version of the tax reform plan. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - OCTOBER 18: Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, speaks with reporters as he arrives for lunch with Senate Republicans in the Capitol on Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
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  • This article originally appeared on HuffPost.
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