This boy's calendar: a window to Kavanaugh's summer of '82

WASHINGTON (AP) — The letters are scrawled in blue ink across a calendar page from June 1982: BEACH WEEK. The big, bold font seems to indicate the importance of this nine-day stretch on the social calendar of a young Brett Kavanaugh, especially amid more mundane entries like "haircut" and "pick up pictures."

The 36-year-old calendar was presented by Kavanaugh as an alibi against an allegation of sexual assault that will be the subject of an intensely watched hearing Thursday on Capitol Hill, which could decide whether he will be confirmed as a justice of the Supreme Court.

But look closer. You will also see a time capsule from a long-ago summer and a window into the hard-partying prep school culture in which acquaintances say the future federal judge was an enthusiastic participant. This included Beach Week, an annual rite of Washington-area high schoolers that is as anticipated by teens as it is feared by their parents.

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WASHINGTON DC -- NOVEMBER 13: Brett Kavanaugh, aide to Independent Counsel Kenneth Starr, during a meeting in the Office of the Solicitor General on November 13, 1996 in Washington DC. (Photo by David Hume Kennerly/Getty Images)
US Judge Brett Kavanaugh looks on as the US President announces him as his nominee to the Supreme Court in the East Room of the White House on July 9, 2018 in Washington, DC. (Photo by SAUL LOEB / AFP) (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
US Judge Brett Kavanaugh (L) shakes hands with US President Donald Trump after being nominated to the Supreme Court in the East Room of the White House on July 9, 2018 in Washington, DC. (Photo by SAUL LOEB / AFP) (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
U.S. President George W. Bush (R) listens to U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Judge Brett Kavanaugh speak, [moments after being sworn-in at a Rose Garden ceremony at the White House], in Washington June 1, 2006.
U.S. President Donald Trump introduces his Supreme Court nominee judge Brett Kavanaugh in the East Room of the White House in Washington, U.S., July 9, 2018. REUTERS/Leah Millis
UNITED STATES - JUNE 01: Brett Kavanaugh speaks in the Rose Garden of the White House on June 1, 2006 in Washington, D.C., after being sworn in to be a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals. (Photo by Dennis Brack/Bloomberg via Getty Images)
US President Donald Trump (R) announces US Judge Brett Kavanaugh (C) as his nominee to the Supreme Court in the East Room of the White House on July 9, 2018 in Washington, DC. (Photo by SAUL LOEB / AFP) (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
U.S. President George W. Bush (L) watches as Brett Kavanaugh (2nd L) is sworn in as a judge in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia by Supreme Court Associate Justice Anthony Kennedy (R) in a Rose Garden ceremony at the White House in Washington June 1, 2006. Kavanaugh's wife, Ashley, holds the bible. REUTERS/Larry Downing (UNITED STATES)
WASHINGTON - MAY 22: District of Columbia Circut Court of Appeals nominee Brett Kavanaugh attends a news conference with Senate GOP leadership in the Capitol May 22, 2006 in Washington, DC. Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist (R-TN) said that Kavanaugh deserves a straight up-or-down vote in the Senate. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh smiles next to U.S. President Donald Trump in the East Room of the White House in Washington, U.S., July 9, 2018. REUTERS/Jim Bourg TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
WASHINGTON - MAY 22: District of Columbia Circut Court of Appeals nominee Brett Kavanaugh (L) and Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist (R-TN) hold a news conference in the Capitol May 22, 2006 in Washington, DC. Frist said that Kavanaugh deserves a straight up-or-down vote in the Senate. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh smiles next to U.S. President Donald Trump in the East Room of the White House in Washington, U.S., July 9, 2018. REUTERS/Jim Bourg
WASHINGTON - MAY 22: (L-R) U.S. Senate Majority Whip Mitch McConnell (R-KY), District of Columbia Circut Court of Appeals nominee Brett Kavanaugh and Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist (R-TN) hold a news conference in the Capitol May 22, 2006 in Washington, DC. Frist said that Kavanaugh deserves a straight up-or-down vote in the Senate. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON - MAY 22: (L-R) U.S. Senate Majority Whip Mitch McConnell (R-KY), District of Columbia Circut Court of Appeals nominee Brett Kavanaugh and Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist (R-TN) hold a news conference in the Capitol May 22, 2006 in Washington, DC. Frist said that Kavanaugh deserves a straight up-or-down vote in the Senate. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - MAY 09: Brett Kavanaugh testifies at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on his nomination to be U. S. Circuit Judge for the Ninth Circuit. (Photo By Chris Maddaloni/Roll Call/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - MAY 09: Brett M. Kavanaugh, who last appeared before the committee in late April 2004, is sworn in to testify during a second Senate Judiciary confirmation hearing. At right are former bosses Judge Walter K. Stapleton, of the United States Court of Appeals for the 3rd Circuit in Wilmington, Del., and Judge Alex Kozinski, of the United States Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit in Pasadena, Calif., who introduced Kavanaugh to the committee. Kavanaugh, President Bush's staff secretary, is the president's nominee to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. Chairman Arlen Specter, R-Pa., held the second hearing because Committee Democrats wanted to ask Kavanaugh, formerly an associate White House counsel, more questions about his involvement in the administration's legal policies, particularly on the National Security Agency terrorist surveillance program and the treatment of detainees held by the U.S. military. (Photo by Scott J. Ferrell/Congressional Quarterly/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON DC -- NOVEMBER 19: Brett Kavanaugh, associate counsel in the Office of Independent Counsel Kenneth Starr, sits behind Starr during his testimony before the House Judiciary Committee regarding the possible impeachment of President Bill Clinton on November 19, 1998 in Washington DC. (Photo by David Hume Kennerly/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON DC -- NOVEMBER 13: Independent Counsel Kenneth Starr, center, talks with Deputy Independent Counsel John Bates, left, and aide Brett Kavanaugh, right, and another colleague in the Office of the Solicitor General during the Whitewater Investigation on November 13, 1996 in Washington DC. (Photo by David Hume Kennerly/Getty Images)
Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, his wife Ashley Estes Kavanaugh (off frame) and their two daughters stand by US President Donald Trump after he announced his nomination in the East Room of the White House on July 9, 2018 in Washington, DC. (Photo by MANDEL NGAN / AFP) (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh (R) speaks after US President Donald Trump announced his nomination in the East Room of the White House on July 9, 2018 in Washington, DC. (Photo by MANDEL NGAN / AFP) (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, his wife Ashley Estes Kavanaugh and their two daughters stand by US President Donald Trump after he announced his nomination in the East Room of the White House on July 9, 2018 in Washington, DC. (Photo by MANDEL NGAN / AFP) (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
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Kavanaugh has flatly denied the allegations of three women who have come forward to accuse him of sexual misconduct amid drunken parties during high school in suburban Maryland and college at Yale.

In earlier public statements, he distanced himself from the boozy reputation of boys from Georgetown Prep, portraying his younger self as a church-going, high-performing scholar athlete. In prepared testimony released Wednesday, he changed his tune.

"I drank beer with my friends, usually on weekends," he now says. "Sometimes I had too many. In retrospect, I said and did things in high school that make me cringe now."

Senators are likely to key in on his shifting descriptions of his high school years as they investigate a claim by Christine Blasey Ford that Kavanaugh tried to rape her during a small house party that summer. Ford gave her account of an abusive encounter with Kavanaugh in an article in The Washington Post.

Since then, other women have gone public with allegations against Kavanaugh. In an article published Sunday by The New Yorker, a Yale University classmate, Deborah Ramirez, described Brett Kavanaugh placing his penis in front of her during a dormitory party. In a sworn declaration released Wednesday, Julie Swetnick of Washington, D.C., said she witnessed Kavanaugh "consistently engage in excessive drinking and inappropriate contact of a sexual nature with women in the early 1980s."

In his prepared statement for Thursday's hearing, Kavanaugh said: "Sexual assault is horrific. It is morally wrong. It is illegal. It is contrary to my religious faith." Referring to Ford — the only accuser asked to testify at Thursday's hearing — he said: "I have never done that to her or to anyone. I am innocent of this charge."

Efforts to gauge Kavanaugh's credibility have prompted a close examination in recent days of various pieces of evidence from his life more than three decades ago.

As he was trying to deflect questions about teenage drinking, new stories and tweets pointed to his senior yearbook page, which includes this description: "Keg City Club (Treasurer) — 100 Kegs or Bust." One of his highlighted quotes is "Down the Hatch!"

Kavanaugh's yearbook page describes him as a member of the "Beach Week Ralph Club," an apparent reference to vomiting from drinking too much alcohol.

Then there are Kavanaugh's notations from his calendar for the summer of 1982. Along with multiple listings for parties, he includes college interviews. He notes when he's been grounded and writes, "Go to Connecticut with Grammy." He scribbled girls' names — "Nikki" and "Suzanne" — on various days.

One classmate of Kavanaugh's in the Georgetown Prep Class of 1983 said the calendar also details just how much time and attention was spent on heavy drinking, from the estates of suburban Washington to the beaches of the Maryland shore. The classmate said he saw Kavanaugh repeatedly during Beach Week. Whenever they met, the man said, Kavanaugh was drinking. But then again, so was everyone else.

"You didn't show up without a six-pack or a keg," said the classmate, who spoke on condition of anonymity to protect his business and professional relationships within the Georgetown Prep community. "You consumed whatever was available, six-packs, kegs, gin, grain alcohol, you name it. You drank when you got up at 10 a.m. and you were drinking when you collapsed at 2 or 3 a.m."

At one point, the classmate said, someone from Kavanaugh's group heaved a keg from a landing of a high-rise for kicks.

Back home from the beach, there was, apparently, more drinking in July.

The first day of the month, Kavanaugh scribbled a plan to "go to Timmy's for skis" with several football teammates. Skis was shorthand for "brew-skis," the classmate recalled.

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For more coverage of Brett Kavanaugh's Supreme Court nomination, visit https://apnews.com/tag/Kavanaughnomination

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