Trump says response to Puerto Rico storm 'underappreciated'

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump said Wednesday the government is ready for massive Hurricane Florence and insisted that his administration's response to the devastation in Puerto Rico last year was an "underappreciated great job."

In a series of morning tweets, as Florence bore down on the Southeast U.S. coast, Trump bristled over criticism of the response to Hurricane Maria, in which 3,000 people died in Puerto Rico.

"We got A Pluses for our recent hurricane work in Texas and Florida (and did an unappreciated great job in Puerto Rico, even though an inaccessible island with very poor electricity and a totally incompetent Mayor of San Juan). We are ready for the big one that is coming!" Trump tweeted.

RELATED: Hurricane Maria destroyed village's only bridge to the outside world

21 PHOTOS
Hurricane Maria destroyed village's only bridge to the outside world
See Gallery
Hurricane Maria destroyed village's only bridge to the outside world
Ana Maria Jimenez, 89, lays on a bed after Hurricane Maria destroyed the town's bridge and the surrounding areas, in San Lorenzo, Morovis, Puerto Rico, October 5, 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez SEARCH "BAEZ LORENZO" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY.
Dariana Baez, holds her one-month-old niece Amalia Garcia at her house after Hurricane Maria destroyed the town's bridge and the surrounding areas, in San Lorenzo, Morovis, Puerto Rico, October 5, 2017 REUTERS/Alvin Baez SEARCH "BAEZ LORENZO" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
A local resident carries a gasoline can as he crosses a river using a cable after Hurricane Maria destroyed the town's bridge in San Lorenzo, Morovis, Puerto Rico, October 4, 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez SEARCH "BAEZ LORENZO" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Local residents try to fix a truck after Hurricane Maria destroyed the town's bridge and the surrounding areas, in San Lorenzo, Morovis, Puerto Rico, October 5, 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez SEARCH "BAEZ LORENZO" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
An America flag is seen after Hurricane Maria hit San Lorenzo, Morovis, Puerto Rico, October 4, 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez SEARCH "BAEZ LORENZO" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
A boy looks at his neighbourhood after Hurricane Maria destroyed the town's bridge and the surrounding areas, in San Lorenzo, Morovis, Puerto Rico, October 5, 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez SEARCH "BAEZ LORENZO" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
A damaged house is seen after Hurricane Maria destroyed the town's bridge and the surrounding areas, in San Lorenzo, Morovis, Puerto Rico, October 5, 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez SEARCH "BAEZ LORENZO" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Ismael Rivera stands at his damaged house after Hurricane Maria destroyed the town's bridge in San Lorenzo, Morovis, Puerto Rico, October 4, 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez SEARCH "BAEZ LORENZO" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
A local resident carries a box of food as he walks along the side of a river after Hurricane Maria destroyed the town's bridge in San Lorenzo, Morovis, Puerto Rico, October 4, 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez SEARCH "BAEZ LORENZO" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Carmen Rodrigues stands by her bedridden mother, Rosa Maria Torres, 95, after Hurricane Maria destroyed the town's bridge in San Lorenzo, Morovis, Puerto Rico, October 5, 2017. The family are trying to get Torres airlifted out of the town. "If they don't move her out of here, she's going to die," said Carmen Santos, Torres' granddaughter. REUTERS/Alvin Baez SEARCH "BAEZ LORENZO" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Ismael Rivera stands at his damaged house after Hurricane Maria destroyed the town's bridge in San Lorenzo, Morovis, Puerto Rico, October 4, 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez SEARCH "BAEZ LORENZO" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Ramon Sostre, stands in front of his damaged house after Hurricane Maria destroyed the town's bridge in San Lorenzo, Morovis, Puerto Rico, October 4, 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez SEARCH "BAEZ LORENZO" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Haydee Mestre looks inside her refrigerator after Hurricane Maria destroyed the town's bridge and the surrounding areas, in San Lorenzo, Morovis, Puerto Rico, October 5, 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez SEARCH "BAEZ LORENZO" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Local residents cross a river using a cable after Hurricane Maria destroyed the town's bridge in San Lorenzo, Morovis, Puerto Rico, October 4, 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez SEARCH "BAEZ LORENZO" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
A general view of San Lorenzo after Hurricane Maria destroyed the town's bridge in Morovis, Puerto Rico, October 4, 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez SEARCH "BAEZ LORENZO" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
A local resident takes a bath in a river after Hurricane Maria destroyed the town's bridge in San Lorenzo, Morovis, Puerto Rico, October 4, 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez SEARCH "BAEZ LORENZO" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
A local resident washes her hair at a pond after Hurricane Maria destroyed the town's bridge in San Lorenzo, Morovis, Puerto Rico, October 4, 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez SEARCH "BAEZ LORENZO" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Local residents stand by a bridge which was destroyed by Hurricane Maria in San Lorenzo, Morovis, Puerto Rico, October 4, 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez SEARCH "BAEZ LORENZO" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Local residents walk along a road after Hurricane Maria destroyed the town's bridge and the surrounding areas, in San Lorenzo, Morovis, Puerto Rico, October 5, 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez SEARCH "BAEZ LORENZO" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Ruth Santiago refreshes herself with water from a pipe after Hurricane Maria destroyed the town's bridge in San Lorenzo, Morovis, Puerto Rico, October 4, 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez SEARCH "BAEZ LORENZO" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY.
Local residents walk in a river after Hurricane Maria destroyed the town's bridge in San Lorenzo, Morovis, Puerto Rico, October 4, 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez SEARCH "BAEZ LORENZO" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY.
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

His next dispatch warned people about Florence, predicted to dump massive amounts of rain on the already-soggy Southeast later this week.

"Hurricane Florence is looking even bigger than anticipated. It will be arriving soon. FEMA, First Responders and Law Enforcement are supplied and ready. Be safe!"

The administration's efforts in Puerto Rico received widespread criticism, and he battled with Mayor Carmen Yulín Cruz. But after visiting the island last September, Trump said that Puerto Ricans were fortunate that the storm did not yield a catastrophe akin to the havoc wreaked by Hurricane Katrina along the Gulf Coast.

All told, about 1,800 people died in that 2005 storm. Puerto Rico's governor last month raised the U.S. territory's official death toll from Hurricane Maria from 64 to 2,975. The storm is also estimated to have caused $100 billion in damage.

A day earlier, the president praised the response to the series of storms. "I think Puerto Rico was an incredible, unsung success."

The governor of Puerto Rico, Ricardo Rossello, seized on Trump's use of the word "successful" and said in a statement issued later Tuesday: "No relationship between a colony and the federal government can ever be called 'successful' because Puerto Ricans lack certain inalienable rights enjoyed by our fellow Americans in the states."

Rossello called Hurricane Maria "the worst natural disaster in our modern history" and said work still remained before they could move on to other stages of recovery. He also said he was still waiting for Trump to respond to a petition to help Puerto Rico complete work on emergency housing restoration programs and debris removal.

Trump, having long struggled to express empathy at times of national crises, sparked outrage when during his visit to the island he feuded with the mayor of San Juan and passed out paper towels to victims like he was shooting baskets.

While defending the handling of the previous storm, he urged caution in regards to the new one bearing down on North Carolina, South Carolina and Virginia.

"The safety of American people is my absolute highest priority," Trump told reporters in the Oval Office. "We are sparing no expense. We are totally prepared. We are ready. We are ready as anybody has ever been."

The president, flanked by maps of the storm and the heads of the Department of Homeland Security and the Federal Emergency Management Agency, said Florence was unlikely to change course before it is expected to make landfall with 130 mph winds and potentially ruinous rains in the coming days.

"They haven't seen anything like what's coming at us in 25, 30 years, maybe ever," Trump said of the states in the storm's path. "It's tremendously big and tremendously wet. Tremendous amount of water."

Florence was expected to blow ashore late Thursday or early Friday, then slow down and wring itself out for days, unloading 1 to 2½ feet (0.3 to 0.8 meters) of rain that could cause flooding well inland and wreak environmental havoc by washing over industrial waste sites and hog farms. North and South Carolina and Virginia ordered mass evacuations along the coast.

___

Associated Press writer Ken Thomas contributed to this report.

___

Follow Kellman and Lemire on Twitter at http://twitter.com/@APLaurie Kellman and http://twitter.com/@JonLemire

___

For the latest on Hurricane Florence, visit apnews.com/tag/Hurricanes

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.