Lindsey Graham: Trump talking about John McCain 'pisses me off to no end'

Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) had some choice words to share about President Donald Trump’s “disturbing” way of handling the recent death of Sen. John McCain.

“It bothers me greatly when the president says things about John McCain. It pisses me off to no end, and I let the president know it,” Graham said in an interview with John Dickerson on “CBS This Morning” on Thursday.

“The way [Trump’s] handled the passing of John is just, was disturbing. We finally got it right. … I am not going to give up on the idea of working with this president. The best way I can honor John McCain is help my country.”

RELATED: John McCain's memorial service at the Arizona Capitol

20 PHOTOS
John McCain's memorial service at the Arizona Capitol
See Gallery
John McCain's memorial service at the Arizona Capitol
Cindy McCain, wife of U.S. Senator John McCain, touches the casket during a memorial service at the Arizona Capitol in Phoenix, Arizona, U.S., August 29, 2018. Jae C. Hong/Pool via REUTERS
U.S. Senator John McCain's wife Cindy and their sons James (L) and John (R) follow Senator McCain's casket into the Arizona State Capitol where he will lie in state in Phoenix, Arizona, U.S., August 29, 2018. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
Meghan McCain, daughter of U.S. Senator John McCain, cries over the casket during a memorial service at the Arizona Capitol in Phoenix, Arizona, U.S., August 29, 2018. Jae C. Hong/Pool via REUTERS
U.S. Senator John McCain's wife Cindy and their sons James (L) and John (3rd L) follow Senator McCain's casket into the Arizona State Capitol where he will lie in state in Phoenix, Arizona, U.S., August 29, 2018. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
Cindy McCain, wife of Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz. sits with her sons Jack, Jimmy, and daughter Meghan during a memorial service at the Arizona Capitol in Phoenix, Arizona, U.S., August 29, 2018. Ross D. Franklin/Pool via REUTERS
Cindy McCain and her son John follow the casket of U.S. Senator John McCain into the Arizona State Capitol where he will lie in state in Phoenix, Arizona, U.S., August 29, 2018. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
Cindy McCain, wife of U.S. Senator John McCain, attends a memorial service at the Arizona Capitol in Phoenix, Arizona, U.S., August 29, 2018. Pool via REUTERS
The Arizona National Guard carries the casket into the museum rotunda during a memorial service for U.S. Senator John McCain at the Arizona Capitol in Phoenix, Arizona, U.S., August 29, 2018. Ross D. Franklin/Pool via REUTERS
U.S. Senator John McCain's wife Cindy and their sons James (L) and John (R) follow Senator McCain's casket into the Arizona State Capitol where he will lie in state in Phoenix, Arizona, U.S., August 29, 2018. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
Mourners touch the casket during a memorial service for U.S. Senator John McCain at the Arizona Capitol in Phoenix, Arizona, U.S., August 29, 2018. Jae C. Hong/Pool via REUTERS
An honor guard salutes as the casket of U.S. Senator John McCain arrives at the Arizona State Capitol where he will lie in state in Phoenix, Arizona, U.S., August 29, 2018. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
Cindy McCain, wife of U.S. Senator John McCain, touches the casket during a memorial service at the Arizona Capitol in Phoenix, Arizona, U.S., August 29, 2018. Jae C. Hong/Pool via REUTERS
The Arizona National Guard carries the casket into the museum rotunda during a memorial service for U.S. Senator John McCain at the Arizona Capitol in Phoenix, Arizona, U.S., August 29, 2018. Jae C. Hong/Pool via REUTERS
Meghan McCain, daughter of U.S. Senator John McCain touches the casket during a memorial service at the Arizona Capitol in Phoenix, Arizona, U.S., August 29, 2018. Ross D. Franklin/Pool via REUTERS
A guest pays his respects at the casket of U.S. Senator John McCain during a memorial service at the Arizona Capitol in Phoenix, Arizona, U.S., August 29, 2018. Pool via REUTERS
The casket of Senator John McCain is carried by members of the Arizona National Guard to the Arizona State Capitol Rotunda where he will lie in state, August 29, 2018 in Phoenix, Arizona. - Senator John McCain, a decorated American war hero, US Senator and two-time presidential candidate, will lie in state at the Arizona State Capitol before being transported to Washington DC where he will be buried at Arlington National Cemetery. (Photo by Robyn Beck / AFP) (Photo credit should read ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)
PHOENIX, AZ - AUGUST 29: Cindy McCain, wife of Sen. John McCain, is escorted to the Arizona State Capitol Rotunda by her sons Jack (L) and Jimmy (R) where her husbands' body will lie in state on August 29, 2018 in Phoenix, Arizona. Sen. McCain, a decorated war hero, died August 25 at the age of 81 after a long battle with Glioblastoma, a form of brain cancer. (Photo by Ralph Freso/Getty Images)
PHOENIX, AZ - AUGUST 29: Arizona governor Doug Ducey and wife Angela walk out of the State Capitol to accept the body of Sen. John McCain to the Capitol's Rotunda where it will lie in state on August 29, 2018 in Phoenix, Arizona. Sen. McCain, a decorated war hero, died August 25 at the age of 81 after a long battle with Glioblastoma, a form of brain cancer. (Photo by Ralph Freso/Getty Images)
PHOENIX, AZ - AUGUST 29: Cindy McCain, wife of Sen. John McCain, is escorted to the Arizona State Capitol Rotunda where her husband's body will lie in state on August 29, 2018 in Phoenix, Arizona. Sen. McCain, a decorated war hero, died August 25 at the age of 81 after a long battle with Glioblastoma, a form of brain cancer. (Photo by Ralph Freso/Getty Images)
PHOENIX, AZ - AUGUST 29: Cindy McCain, wife of Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz. arrives with her sons Jack and Jimmy during a memorial service at the Arizona Capitol on August 29, 2018 in Phoenix, Arizona. Sen. McCain, a decorated war hero, died August 25 at the age of 81 after a long battle with Glioblastoma, a form of brain cancer. (Photo by Ross D. Franklin-Pool via Getty Images)
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

McCain, a former Republican presidential nominee and decorated veteran of the Vietnam War, was 81 when he died Saturday. He was diagnosed with brain cancer in July 2017 after a routine physical revealed a blood clot over his left eye. His family announced he was discontinuing his cancer treatment just days before his death.

Graham and McCain had been close friends in the Senate.

Trump and McCain, however, have had contentious interactions since the 2016 presidential campaign. Many people criticized Trump’s tweet about McCain’s death, saying it was delayed, simplistic and neglected to mention any of McCain’s achievements for the country.

Trump also drew criticism for not calling for flags to be lowered to half-staff and kept there until McCain’s burial. The White House initially returned its flag to full-staff on Monday, following the minimum protocol for the death of a sitting member of Congress, though a presidential proclamation for keeping flags at half-staff longer is typically issued when a high-profile figure dies. 

On that front, Graham told Dickerson that he “called some people around” Trump to right the wrong and get the flag lowered again.

On Monday afternoon, Trump issued a proclamation to keep flags at half-staff until McCain’s Sunday burial, and the White House flag was lowered again.

Additionally, Graham said he told Trump that he could learn a thing or two from McCain.

“John McCain was a big man, worthy of a big country. Mr. President, you need to be the big man that the presidency requires,” Graham said he told him.

This article originally appeared on HuffPost.

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.