The people have spoken and they want to eat the diseased tomb cheese

If there's one thing that unites the human race, it's the strange desire to consume things we definitely shouldn't.

Shortly after a group of archeologists announced that they'd found the world's oldest cheese buried in an Egyptian tomb, the internet decided that it wanted a taste of the ancient snack.

SEE ALSO: Please don't eat the world's oldest cheese

Led by researchers from the University of Catania and Cairo University, the group of archeologists discovered the cheese in a tomb that was first unearthed in 1885. They published their findings in the July issue of Analytical Chemistry.

Per the report, an analysis of the cheese showed that it's contaminated with Brucella melitensis, which can cause a nearly fatal disease called brucellosis. 

But the threat of death has never deterred the internet before. 

Considering more than 32,000 people signed a Change.org petition to drink the mummy juice from the mysterious sarcophagus that was unearthed last month, is it really surprising that anyone wants a bite of this (probably cursed) cheese?

Some thought it might pair well with the sarcophagus broth, like some sort of jinxed charcuterie plate. 

If there's anything we've learned from creepy childhood cartoons, it's that we shouldn't mess with mummies.

Should archeologists unearth ancient crackers that'll pair well with sarcophagus juice and diseased cheese, all we'll need is a ouija board for the ultimate cursed game night.

RELATED: See photos from the "cursed" black sarcophagus: 

10 PHOTOS
Archaeologists open mysterious 2,000-year-old sarcophagus
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Archaeologists open mysterious 2,000-year-old sarcophagus
General view of the residential area where a coffin containing three mummies was discovered in Alexandria, Egypt July 19, 2018. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El Ghany TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Coffin is moved over by a truck after archaeologists unearthed a sarcophagus containing three mummies in Alexandria, Egypt July 19, 2018. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El Ghany
Army soldiers guard the site of a discovery where archaeologist unearthed a coffin containing three mummies in Alexandria, Egypt July 19, 2018. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El Ghany
Archaeologists and workers unearth closed coffin containing three mummies with remains of three people in Alexandria, Egypt July 19, 2018. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El Ghany
Archaeologists and workers stand over a coffin containing three mummies in Alexandria, Egypt July 19, 2018. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El Ghany
Army soldiers guard the site of a discovery where archaeologist unearthed a coffin containing three mummies in Alexandria, Egypt July 19, 2018. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El Ghany
Archaeologists unearth coffin containing three mummies with sewage water and bones inside, in Alexandria, Egypt July 19, 2018. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El Ghany
Workers unearth coffin containing three mummies with sewage water and bones inside in Alexandria, Egypt July 19, 2018. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El Ghany
Children and residents watch archaeologists unearth coffin containing three mummies with sewage water and bones inside in Alexandria, Egypt July 19, 2018. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El Ghany
A handout picture released on July 19, 2018 by the Egyptian Antiques ministry shows skeletons in the black granite sarcophagus uncovered early this month in the Sidi Gaber district of Alexandria, filled with sewage water. - Skeletons are believed to be three warriors as one of the skulls bear a wound resulted from the hit of an arrow. (Photo by - / EGYPTIAN ANTIQUITIES MINISTRY / AFP) / XGTY / === RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT 'AFP PHOTO / HO / EGYPTIAN MINISTRY OF ANTIQUITIES- NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS == (Photo credit should read -/AFP/Getty Images)
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