Baffled Titanic expert says luxury ship should not have sunk after iceberg impact

The sinking of luxury cruiser, Titanic, baffled the nation and the world in 1912, after an iceberg collision resulted in the death of about 1,500 people.

Now, over 100 years later, REELZ’s new docuseries, Collision Course: Titanic, seeks to inform viewers about the unfathomable tragedy, and reveal new details about the boat’s quick collapse.

“There were three million of these that put the ship together,” Tom Lynskey, the creator of video game Titanic: Honor and Glory, says while holding a steel rivet (like those which held up the Titanic’s plates) in the show teaser.

SEE: Items recovered from the Titanic up for auction: 

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Items from RMS Titanic sold at auction
A pocket watch recovered from the RMS Titanic is on display during the Titanic Auction preview by Guernsey's Auction House in New York January 5, 2012. The biggest collection of Titanic artifacts is to be sold off as a single lot in an auction timed for the 100th anniversary in April of the sinking of the famed ocean liner. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT DISASTER)
A lunch menu for the Titanic is on display at Bonham's auction house in New York April 10, 2012. Bonham's will sell off items such as telegrams, books, newspapers, and replicas from the film "Titanic" for the auction "R.M.S. Titanic: 100 Years of Fact and Fiction" on Sunday, April 15, 2012. REUTERS/Keith Bedford (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS)
An attendent displays a volume of thirty-four signals between the ocean liners Olympic, Titanic, Carpathia and other ships, dated April 14th to April 16th 1912, detailing the distress signals of the Titanic and rescue operations following the disaster during an auction of maritime items at Christie's East in New York, February 17. The volume of messages sold at the auction for $123,500 to an undisclosed bidder.
A cast bronze name board from the Titanic cruise ship's life boat sits on display at Christie's in New York May 26, 2006. The board and three other pieces from Titanic life boats will be sold off during the auction house's "Ocean Liner Furnishings and Art" auction on June 1. REUTERS/Keith Bedford
A cast bronze name board from the Titanic cruise ship's life boat is displayed at Christie's in New York May 26, 2006. The board and three other pieces from Titanic life boats will be sold off during the auction house's "Ocean Liner Furnishings and Art" auction on June 1. REUTERS/Keith Bedford
A pair of binoculars recovered from the RMS Titanic is on display during the Titanic Auction preview by Guernsey's Auction House in New York, January 5, 2012. The biggest collection of Titanic artifacts is to be sold off as a single lot in an auction timed for the 100th anniversary in April of the sinking of the famed ocean liner. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid (UNITED STATES - Tags: DISASTER)
Jewelry recovered from the RMS Titanic is on display during the Titanic Auction preview by Guernsey's Auction House in New York, January 5, 2012. The biggest collection of Titanic artifacts will be sold off as a single lot in an auction timed for the 100th anniversary in April of the sinking of the famed ocean liner. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT DISASTER)
A diamond-encrusted bracelet recovered from the RMS Titanic is on display during the Titanic Auction preview by Guernsey's Auction House in New York, January 5, 2012. The biggest collection of Titanic artifacts is to be sold off as a single lot in an auction timed for the 100th anniversary in April of the sinking of the famed ocean liner. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid (UNITED STATES - Tags: DISASTER)
A launch ticket for the Titanic is put into a case at Bonham's auction house in New York April 10, 2012. A rare original launch ticket that could sell for up to $70,000 will be the highlight of an auction in New York of Titanic memorabilia to mark the centennial anniversary of the ill-fated voyage, Bonham's said on Tuesday. The ticket, which has its perforated admission stub still intact, would have allowed its holder to the launching and christening of the Titanic. REUTERS/Keith Bedford (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY BUSINESS)
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“The theory is the cold water made the rivets and the steel itself on the whole plating weak, it made it brittle,” he adds.

Lynskey says that after the sinking tragedy of 1912, new rivets were made in the same shape, from the same steel and were tested using the same temperature water, up against the same force of an iceberg impact.

“They hold up quite well,” he said.

Lynskey is not the only person who’s wondered why an iceberg was able to cause such damage to a large, 882 feet, ship like the Titanic. For decades, baffled family members of the victims and boat experts have come up with theories regarding the incident. Some even suggested that the vessel had other technical difficulties that resulted in its destruction.

“It was not the rivets that failed,” says Lynskey.

Collision Course: Titanic, airs Sunday, August 19 at 10:00 ET / PT on REELZ.

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