President Trump rages against FBI's handling of Andrew McCabe's 'text massages' in typo tweet

President Trump raged against the FBI and rehashed his grievances against fired Deputy Director Andrew McCabe during a Saturday morning Twitter tantrum rendered a joke by his inability to proofread.

“Why isn’t the FBI giving Andrew McCabe text massages to Judicial Watch or appropriate government authorities,” he wondered. “FBI said they won’t give up even one (I may have to get involved, DO NOT DESTROY), What are they hiding? McCabe wife took big campaign dollars from Hillary people….”

The “text massages” typo remained online for more than a half hour before it was deleted and corrected with the appropriate “text messages.” Still, it was plenty of time for social media users to screen-grab the error and poke fun at the President’s mistake — the latest on a long list of Twitter typos.

Trump also took aim at former FBI director James Comey as well as agents Peter Strzok and “his lover, the lovely Lisa Page.”

RELATED: Comey's life after FBI 

12 PHOTOS
James Comey's life after President Trump fired him as FBI director
See Gallery
James Comey's life after President Trump fired him as FBI director
James Comey, former director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), speaks during an interview in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, May 8, 2018. Comey said he's 'disappointed and disgusted' with Republican attacks on Special Counsel Robert Mueller's Russia investigation, a campaign led by former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani since he became one of President Donald Trump's top lawyers. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Former FBI Director James Comey arrives to speak about his book "A Higher Loyalty" in New York, U.S., April 18, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Attendees collect their copies of former FBI director James Comey's book as they arrive to hear him speak at an onstage interview at George Washington University in Washington, U.S. April 30, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Former FBI Director James Comey is sworn in prior to testifying before a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on Russia's alleged interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., June 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 07: Former FBI director James Comey laughs while answering questions during an interview forum at the Washington Post May 8, 2018 in Washington, DC. Comey discussed his stormy tenure as head of the FBI, his handling of the Hillary Clinton email investigation, his tense relationship with President Trump and his controversial firing a year ago, during the forum. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
Former FBI Director James Comey arrives for a taping of "The Late Show with Stephen Colbert" in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., April 17, 2018. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
Former FBI director James Comey speaks about his book during an onstage interview with Axios Executive Editor Mike Allen at George Washington University in Washington, U.S. April 30, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Former FBI Director James Comey testifies before a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on Russia's alleged interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., June 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Former Federal Bureau of Investigations Director James Comey departs after testifying before a closed session of the Senate Intelligence Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., U.S., June 8, 2017. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein
Former FBI Director James Comey testifies before a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on Russia's alleged interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., June 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 30: Former FBI Director James Comey talks onstage at George Washington University April 30, 3018 in Washington, DC. Comey discussed his new book 'Higher Loyalty: Truth, Lies, and Leadership.' (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Former FBI Director James Comey testifies before a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on "Russian Federation Efforts to Interfere in the 2016 U.S. Elections" on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S. June 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

Strzok and Page exchanged a series of text messages amid the 2016 Presidential campaign that were highly critical of then-candidate Trump. All three of them worked together on the FBI’s probe into Hillary Clinton’s emails as well as special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia collusion investigation — which Trump has repeatedly branded a “witch hunt.”

He has also often accused the bureau of bias and has held up Strzok and Page as examples.

Judicial Watch, a right-leaning watchdog group, through the Freedom of Information Act has been seeking a selection of communications and text messages from top FBI officials, including those of McCabe, who served as the FBI’s Deputy Director until he was fired — just a month shy of retirement — in March.

Trump has often targeted McCabe, claiming he abused his position in exchange for donations to his wife’s Democratic congressional campaign. The funds came from a PAC helmed by Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe, who was chair of Clinton’s 2008 campaign.

An Inspector General’s Report, cited to justify McCabe’s prompt firing, concluded the former deputy director violated Justice Department policy in authorizing an aide to speak with the Wall Street Journal for its probe into the Clinton Foundation. The report pointed to a "lack of candor, including under oath” as the primary reason behind his dismissal.

“Andrew McCabe FIRED, a great day for the hard working men and women of the FBI - A great day for Democracy. Sanctimonious James Comey was his boss and made McCabe look like a choirboy. He knew all about the lies and corruption going on at the highest levels of the FBI!” Trump tweeted back in March.

PHOTOS: Former FBI deputy director Andrew McCabe 

9 PHOTOS
Former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe
See Gallery
Former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe
Newly installed acting FBI Director Andrew McCabe testifies before the Senate Intelligence Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, May 11, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - MAY 11: Acting FBI Director Andrew McCabe prepares to testify during the Senate (Select) Intelligence Committee hearing on 'World Wide Threats' on Thursday, May 11, 2017. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
UNITED STATES - MAY 11: Acting FBI Director Andrew McCabe prepares to testify during the Senate (Select) Intelligence Committee hearing on 'World Wide Threats' on Thursday, May 11, 2017. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
UNITED STATES - MAY 11: From left, Acting FBI Director Andrew McCabe, CIA Director Mike Pompeo, and Director of National Intelligence Daniel Coats, appear during a Senate (Select) Intelligence Committee hearing in Hart Building titled 'World Wide Threats' on May 11, 2017. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
WASHINGTON, USA - MAY 11: Andrew McCabe, Acting Director of the FBI after President Trump fired James Comey, speaks during a Senate Select Committee on Intelligence hearing on Worldwide Threats in Washington, USA on May 11, 2017. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, USA - MAY 11: A binder containing classified material marked Secret sits on the witness table in front of Andrew McCabe, Acting Director of the FBI after President Trump fired James Comey, before a Senate Select Committee on Intelligence hearing on Worldwide Threats in Washington, United States on May 11, 2017. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - DECEMBER 21: Federal Bureau of Investigation Deputy Director Andrew McCabe arrives for a meeting with members of the Oversight and Government Reform and Judiciary committees in the Rayburn House Office Building December 21, 2017 in Washington, DC. McCabe testified before the House Intelligence Committee for ten hours on Tuesday. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
US Attorney General Jeff Sessions (C) speaks with Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price (L) and Acting Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Andrew McCabe (R) during a press conference at the US Department of Justice in Washington, DC, on July 13, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
Acting FBI Director Andrew McCabe testifies before the House Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies Subcommittee on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., June 21, 2017. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

McCabe at the time fired back against the “false, defamatory and degrading” allegations regarding his wife’s congressional run.

"The big picture is a tale of what can happen when law enforcement is politicized, public servants are attacked, and people who are supposed to cherish and protect our institutions become instruments for damaging those institutions and people," he argued, dubbing his dismissal "part of this administration's ongoing war on the FBI and the efforts of [Special Counsel Robert Mueller's Russia] investigation.”

Read Full Story