Randy Moss receiving hate mail for HOF tie

Newly inducted Hall of Fame wide receiver Randy Moss said hundreds of pieces of hate mail greeted him upon his return from Canton, Ohio, this week.

Moss wore a tie listing the names of a dozen black men and women killed by police and was congratulated by dozens of NFL and NBA players for the statement.

But Moss told The Undefeated that "150 to 200 messages" equating to hate mail also found its way to him.

SEE ALSO: 'Be happy, be cool': Trump tweets once again about NFL protests

"The black community praised me and thanked me for shedding light on African-Americans dying," Moss told The Undefeated. "Then on the flip side, you've got sites where people are slamming me, saying, 'Hey, (racial epithet), stay in your place.'

"All of this hate mail I'm getting for wearing a tie and talking about the truth. But I can handle it because I've been dealing with racism my whole life."

9 PHOTOS
2018 Pro Football Hall of Fame induction ceremony
See Gallery
2018 Pro Football Hall of Fame induction ceremony
CANTON, OH - AUGUST 04: Brian Dawkins poses with his bust during the 2018 NFL Hall of Fame Enshrinement Ceremony at Tom Benson Hall of Fame Stadium on August 4, 2018 in Canton, Ohio. (Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images)
CANTON, OH - AUGUST 04: Ray Lewis unveils his bust along with daughter Diaymon Lewis during the 2018 NFL Hall of Fame Enshrinement Ceremony at Tom Benson Hall of Fame Stadium on August 4, 2018 in Canton, Ohio. (Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images)
CANTON, OH - AUGUST 04: Ray Lewis poses with his bust along with daughter Diaymon Lewis during the 2018 NFL Hall of Fame Enshrinement Ceremony at Tom Benson Hall of Fame Stadium on August 4, 2018 in Canton, Ohio. (Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images)
CANTON, OH - AUGUST 04: Emcee Chris Berman addresses the crowd during the 2018 Pro Football Hall of Fame Enshrinement Ceremony on August 4, 2018, at the Tom Benson Hall of Fame Stadium in Canton, OH. (Photo by Frank Jansky/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)
CANTON, OH - AUGUST 04: Randy Moss poses for photographers next to his Hall of Fame bust after he was enshrined into the Pro Football Hall of Fame during the 2018 Pro Football Hall of Fame Enshrinement Ceremony on August 4, 2018, at the Tom Benson Hall of Fame Stadium, Canton, Ohio. (Photo by Frank Jansky/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)
CANTON, OH - AUGUST 04: Robert Brazile points into the crowd as he makes his speech during the 2018 Pro Football Hall of Fame Enshrinement Ceremony on August 4, 2018, at the Tom Benson Hall of Fame Stadium in Canton, OH. (Photo by Frank Jansky/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)
Aug 4, 2018; Canton, OH, USA; Pro Football Hall of Fame Class of 2018 enshrinee Ray Lewis during the Pro Football Hall of Fame Enshrinement Ceremony at Tom Bensen Stadium. Mandatory Credit: Aaron Doster-USA TODAY Sports
Aug 4, 2018; Canton, OH, USA; Philadelphia Eagles and Denver Broncos former safety Brian Dawkins poses with bust during the Pro Football Hall of Fame Enshrinement Ceremony at Tom Bensen Stadium. Mandatory Credit: Kirby Lee-USA TODAY Sports
Aug 4, 2018; Canton, OH, USA;Minnesota Vikings, Oakland Raiders, New England Patriots, Tennessee Titans and San Francisco 49ers former receiver Randy Moss speaks during the Pro Football Hall of Fame Enshrinement Ceremony at Tom Bensen Stadium. Mandatory Credit: Kirby Lee-USA TODAY Sports
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

Moss said he decided in February to make the statement on stage in Canton during his induction ceremony speech. The point, said Moss, was to attempt to unite, not divide.

"We've got to admit to the problem. Everybody," Moss told the website. "What if black police officers around the country were going up in these white neighborhoods with rich white kids and started killing them? What would people say about that?

"A lot of people just don't want to really talk about what's going on."

The issues of racial equality and police brutality helped spark Colin Kaepernick to silently protest by kneeling during the national anthem in 2016 and several other NFL players have followed suit. NBA players have worn T-shirts in pregame with the names of victims and related messages.

--Field Level Media

Read Full Story