Notorious white supremacist Jason Kessler gets go-ahead to hold 'Unite the Right 2' rally near the White House

The organizer of last year’s deadly white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Va., got a petition approved Thursday to hold another far right event — this time directly in front of the White House.

Jason Kessler, who organized the infamous “Unite the Right” rally in Charlottesville last August, was given a go-ahead from the National Park Service to throw a white supremacist protest in Washington, D.C., on Sunday.

The event, dubbed “Unite the Right 2,” will take place in Lafayette Park, just across the road from the White House, according to Kessler’s website. The permit allows 400 far right adherents to rally in the historical park.

The National Park Service also issued two permits for counter protests that will take place in the capital on the same day. Police have stressed it will deploy hundreds of officers to make sure the two feuding factions are separated.

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'Unite the Right' rally organizer Jason Kessler chased out of his own press conference
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'Unite the Right' rally organizer Jason Kessler chased out of his own press conference
CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA - AUGUST 13: Counter protesters (L) confront Jason Kessler (C), an organizer of 'Unite the Right' rally, after Kessler tried to speak outside the Charlottesville City Hall on August 13, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia. The city of Charlottesville remains on edge following violence at a 'Unite the Right' rally held by white nationalists, neo-Nazis and members of the 'alt-right' (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
Unite The Right rally organizer Jason Kessler attempts to speak at a press conference in front of Charlottesville City Hall in Charlottesville, Virginia, August 13, 2017. REUTERS/Justin Ide
Unite The Right rally organizer Jason Kessler is helped by police after being tackled by a woman after he attempted to speak at a press conference in front of Charlottesville City Hall in Charlottesville, Virginia, August 13, 2017. REUTERS/Justin Ide TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Unite The Right rally organizer Jason Kessler is helped by police after being tackled by a woman after he attempted to speak at a press conference in front of Charlottesville City Hall in Charlottesville, Virginia, August 13, 2017. REUTERS/Justin Ide
Unite The Right rally organizer Jason Kessler is helped by police after being tackled by a woman following his attempt to speak at a press conference in front of Charlottesville City Hall in Charlottesville, Virginia, August 13, 2017. REUTERS/Justin Ide
Jason Kessler is helped by police after being tackled by a woman after he attempted to speak at a press conference in front of Charlottesville City Hall in Charlottesville, Virginia, August 13, 2017. REUTERS/Justin Ide
Unite The Right rally organizer Jason Kessler is escorted by police after he attempted to speak at a press conference in front of Charlottesville City Hall in Charlottesville, Virginia, August 13, 2017. REUTERS/Justin Ide
Jason Kessler being escorted away by State Police. Jason Kessler, one of the main organizers for the Unite The Right Rally held this weekend in Charlottesville, Attempted to hold a press conference to counter the events of Saturday. The Presser last about 3 minutes before Kessler was chased and beaten. He was evacuated by Virginia State Police. (Photo by Shay Horse/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
Alt-right blogger Jason Kessler waits for protesters to quiet before begnning a news conference in front of City Hall August 13, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia. Kessler, who helped organize the Unite the Right rally one day earlier, blamed Charlottesville government officials and law enforcement for failing to protect the first amendment rights of the rally's participants, a collection of white supremacists, neo-Nazis, Ku Klux Klan members and alt-right supporters (Photo by Shay Horse/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA - AUGUST 13: Counter protesters shout as Jason Kessler, an organizer of 'Unite the Right' rally, tries to speak outside the Charlottesville City Hall on August 13, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia. The city of Charlottesville remains on edge following violence at a 'Unite the Right' rally held by white nationalists, neo-Nazis and members of the 'alt-right' (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
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“On Sunday we know that we have people coming to our city for the sole purpose of spewing hate,” Washington, D.C., Mayor Muriel Bowser said at a press conference on Thursday afternoon.

Muriel offered her condolences to the family of Heather Heyer, the 32-year-old killed by a neo-Nazi who plowed his sports car into a crowd of counter protesters during last year’s Charlottesville rally.

The mayor urged Washington residents to peacefully protest Sunday’s event and condemned the far right forces pushing forward with a second event.

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One year anniversary of deadly Charlottesville, Virginia rally clashes
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One year anniversary of deadly Charlottesville, Virginia rally clashes
Susan Bro, mother of Heather Heyer, who was killed during the August 2017 white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, looks at the memorial and writings at the site where her daughter was killed in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., July 31, 2018. Picture taken July 31, 2018. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
The Reverend William Peyton poses for a portrait at St. Paul's Memorial Church, ahead the one-year anniversary of the fatal white-nationalist rally, in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., August 1, 2018. Picture taken August 1, 2018. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
A U.S. flag flies from the back of a car, ahead the one-year anniversary of the fatal white-nationalist rally, in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., August 1, 2018. Picture taken August 1, 2018. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
Susan Bro, mother of Heather Heyer, who was killed during the August 2017 white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, looks at mementos of her daughter in her office in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., July 31, 2018. Picture taken July 31, 2018. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
A boy passes tributes written at the site where Heather Heyer was killed during the 2017 white-nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., August 1, 2018. Picture taken August 1, 2018. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
A grave stone reading "Hagar Faithful Servant," according to the local government the grave of a domestic servant or slave of R.K. Meade named Newton Hagar, stands in Maplewood Cemetery, ahead the one-year anniversary of the fatal white-nationalist rally, in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., August 1, 2018. Picture taken August 1, 2018. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
Andrea Douglas, director of the Heritage Center at the Jefferson School, speaks to Reuters, ahead the one-year anniversary of the fatal white-nationalist rally, in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., August 1, 2018. Picture taken August 1, 2018. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
A statue of Civil War Confederate General Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson stands in a park, ahead the one-year anniversary of the fatal white-nationalist rally, in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., August 1, 2018. Picture taken August 1, 2018. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
A statue of Civil War Confederate General Robert E. Lee stands in a park, ahead the one-year anniversary of the fatal white-nationalist rally, in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., August 1, 2018. Picture taken August 1, 2018. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
A sign against racism stands outside a church, ahead the one-year anniversary of the fatal white-nationalist rally, in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., August 1, 2018. Picture taken August 1, 2018. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
A woman walks past tributes written at the site where Heather Heyer was killed during the 2017 white-nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., August 1, 2018. Picture taken August 1, 2018. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
A pedestrian walks past a statue of Civil War Confederate General Robert E. Lee, ahead the one-year anniversary of the fatal white-nationalist rally, in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., August 1, 2018. Picture taken August 1, 2018. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
"End White Supremacy" is written at the site where Heather Heyer was killed during the 2017 white-nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., August 1, 2018. Picture taken August 1, 2018. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
A homeless man lies in the park in front the statue of Confederate Civil War General Robert E. Lee, ahead the one-year anniversary of the fatal white-nationalist rally, in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., July 31, 2018. Picture taken July 31, 2018. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
A local Sheriff patrols past the site where Heather Heyer was killed during the 2017 white-nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., August 1, 2018. Picture taken August 1, 2018. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
Susan Bro, mother of Heather Heyer, who was killed during the August 2017 white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, looks at the memorial and writings at the site where her daughter was killed in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., July 31, 2018. Picture taken July 31, 2018. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
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“It didn’t make sense last year and it doesn’t make sense now,” she said.

Meanwhile, Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam declared a state of emergency ahead of the anniversary of the Charlottesville mayhem. No protests are scheduled in Charlottesville on Sunday, but the governor said the announcement was made out of an abundance of caution.

Local authorities faced intense scrutiny in the wake of last year’s Charlottesville event for not doing enough to ensure the safety of counter protesters.

President Trump infamously inflamed the issue further, blaming “both sides” for the deadly violence and claiming there were “many fine people” among the white supremacists.

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