College basketball to allow undrafted players to return to school, among many other changes

In September, the FBI announced its investigation into fraud surrounding college basketball. In April, a Commission on College Basketball suggested changes. And on Wednesday, the NCAA’s Board of Governors and Division I Board of Directors followed through in implementing a number of them.

Here is a quick synopsis of the changes to college basketball’s rulebook:

Players who go undrafted can return to college basketball

The NCAA’s most notable change revolves around flexibility for those wanting to test the NBA Draft waters. Players who are invited to the NBA draft combine will be able to participate in the NBA draft and return to college if undrafted.

During this time, Division I schools must pay for tuition, fees and books for those who left school, according to the report. Not to mention, the NCAA is establishing a fund for schools that aren’t unable to pay for these items.

“Elite” high school basketball recruits and college players can sign with agents

The first question surrounding this change was, what defines elite? Well, USA Basketball will be tasked with defining that.

To “make informed decisions about going pro,” according to the report, high school basketball recruits and college players will be able to sign agents. This change will go into effect once the NBA and NBAPA allow high school players to turn professional.

Once they do, players will be able to sign with agents July 1 before their senior years.

NCAA to pursue agreement with apparel companies 

Apparel companies have major roles in summer basketball on the AAU circuit. There is an Adidas league, a Nike League and an Under Armour league.

Because of the involvement — highlighted by the arrest of Adidas’ Jim Gatto in September — the NCAA is pursuing an agreement with apparel companies regarding their involvement in youth basketball.

It is unclear how close the NCAA is to an agreement or the likelihood of one. But the connection between prospective student-athletes and apparel brands has been long known.

School presidents and athletics staff must cooperate during investigations and infractions processes

Not only will university presidents and chancellors be “personally accountable” for their programs following the rules, but they will also have contractual obligations to cooperate during investigations.

This could allow the NCAA subpoena power during investigations. According to the release, it could also lead to “stronger penalties,” including longer postseason bans and head coach suspensions, increased recruiting restrictions and additional fines.

Related: Trump hosts NCAA champions at the White House: 

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Trump meets with NCAA teams at the White House
U.S. President Donald Trump strikes a pose with the Penn State Men's Wrestling delegation as he greets members of Championship NCAA teams at the White House in Washington, U.S., November 17, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 17: (AFP OUT) U.S. President Donald Trump and Education Secretary Betsy Devos (L) visit with members of the National Collegiate Athletic Association's champion University of Oklahoma softball team, who gave Trump a mitt, in the East Room of the White House November 17, 2017 in Washington, DC. The White House welcomed athletes representing universities and colleges from across the country to meet Trump who congratulated them on their NCAA victories in sports like lacrosse, bowling, gymnastics, golf, rowing and others. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 17: (AFP OUT) U.S. President Donald Trump and Education Secretary Betsy Devos pose for photographs with members of the National Collegiate Athletic Association's champion University of Florida baseball team in the East Room of the White House November 17, 2017 in Washington, DC. The White House welcomed athletes representing universities and colleges from across the country to meet Trump who congratulated them on their NCAA victories in sports like lacrosse, bowling, gymnastics, golf, rowing and others. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 17: President Donald Trump tosses a volleyball into the air as he meets with the Ohio State mens volleyball team during an event with NCAA championship teams at the White House in Washington, DC on Friday, Nov. 17, 2017. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 17: (AFP OUT) Members of the National Collegiate Athletic Association's champion Penn State women's rugby team pose for photographs with U.S. President Donald Trump in the Rose Garden at the White House November 17, 2017 in Washington, DC. The White House welcomed athletes representing universities and colleges from across the country to meet Trump who congratulated them on their NCAA victories in sports like lacrosse, bowling, gymnastics, golf, rowing and others. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
US President Donald Trump poses with members of the University of Washington women's rowing team on the South Lawn of the White House during an event honoring NCAA national championship teams on November 17, 2017 in Washington, DC. / AFP PHOTO / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 17: (AFP OUT) Members of the National Collegiate Athletic Association's champion University of Washington women's rowing team pose for photographs with U.S. President Donald Trump on the South Lawn of the White House November 17, 2017 in Washington, DC. The White House welcomed athletes representing universities and colleges from across the country to meet Trump who congratulated them on their NCAA victories in sports like lacrosse, bowling, gymnastics, golf, rowing and others. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 17: (AFP OUT) Members of the National Collegiate Athletic Association's champion University of Maryland women's lacrosse team react to something U.S. President Donald Trump said after posing for photographs on the south side of the White House November 17, 2017 in Washington, DC. The White House welcomed athletes representing universities and colleges from across the country to meet Trump who congratulated them on their NCAA victories in sports like lacrosse, bowling, gymnastics, golf, rowing and others. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
US President Donald Trump holds up the tie of University of Maryland lacrosse player Dylan Maltz during an event honoring NCAA national championship teams on November 17, 2017 in Washington, DC. / AFP PHOTO / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 17: President Donald Trump and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos pose for photos with the University of Utah ski team during an event with NCAA championship teams at the White House in Washington, DC on Friday, Nov. 17, 2017. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 17: President Donald Trump poses for photographs with the Texas A&M University men's indoor track and field team as he meets with NCAA championship teams at the White House in Washington, DC on Friday, Nov. 17, 2017. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
US President Donald Trump poses with members of the University of Oklahoma men's gymnastics team in the East Room of the White House during an event honoring the NCAA national championship teams on November 17, 2017 in Washington, DC. / AFP PHOTO / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
US President Donald Trump hugs a member of the Oklahoma women's softball team in the East Room of the White House during an event with NCAA national championship teams on November 17, 2017 in Washington, DC. / AFP PHOTO / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
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