A solar eclipse is coming this week — but it won't be as spectacular as last year's

  • There will be a partial solar eclipse on August 11.
  • The event will be most visible at the North Pole and in northern cities.
  • While the eclipse will be a sight to behold, it won't be quite as stunning as the total eclipse that swept across the US last summer. 

The summer of 2018 continues to be a blockbuster for fantasticcelestial events.

Following July's total lunar eclipse, some sky-watchers will be treated to a partial solar eclipse on August 11. 

During a solar eclipse, the moon passes between the Earth and the sun, casting a shadow on our planet. If you're watching from Earth, the moon appears to cover the sun

The event that captured the US' attention last summer was a total solar eclipse. In that case, the moon blocked the entire sun. But the coming eclipse is only partial, which means that the moon will pass in front of a portion of the sun, rather than covering it entirely.

How much the moon covers the sun depends on your location on Earth. The coming partial solar eclipse will be most visible at the North Pole, EarthSky reports — there, the sun's diameter will be 65% covered. In the northern city of Yakutsk, Russia, the sun will be 57% obscured. In Greenland, the sun will be 50% covered.

Images from 2017's solar eclipse: 

13 PHOTOS
Total solar eclipse 2017
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Total solar eclipse 2017
A multiple exposure image shows the solar eclipse as it creates the effect of a diamond ring at totality as seen from Clingmans Dome, which at 6,643 feet (2,025m) is the highest point in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Tennessee, U.S. August 21, 2017. Location coordinates for this image are 35�33'24" N, 83�29'46" W. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A combination of ten pictures shows the progression of a partial solar eclipse near as a jet plane flies by the total solar eclipse in Guernsey, Wyoming U.S., August 21, 2017. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
SALUDA, SOUTH CAROLINA - AUGUST 21: A small plane is silhouetted by the eclipse as it flies thru the path of totality on August 21, 2017 in Saluda, South Carolina. (Photo by Lou Brutus/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - AUGUST 21: The solar eclipse is seen at Liberty Island on August 21, 2017 in New York City. While New York was not in the path of totality for the solar eclipse, around 72 percent of the sun was covered by the moon during the peak time of the partial eclipse. (Photo by Noam Galai/WireImage)
ROXBURY, NJ - AUGUST 21: The Moon is seen passing in front of the Sun during a Solar Eclipse on August 21, 2017 at Roxbury High School in Roxbury, NJ. A total solar eclipse swept across a narrow portion of the contiguous United States from Lincoln Beach, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. A partial solar eclipse was visible across the entire North American continent along with parts of South America, Africa, and Europe. (Photo by Rich Graessle/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)
ROXBURY, NJ - AUGUST 21: The Moon is seen passing in front of the Sun during a Solar Eclipse on August 21, 2017 at Roxbury High School in Roxbury, NJ. A total solar eclipse swept across a narrow portion of the contiguous United States from Lincoln Beach, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. A partial solar eclipse was visible across the entire North American continent along with parts of South America, Africa, and Europe. (Photo by Rich Graessle/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)
ROXBURY, NJ - AUGUST 21: The Moon is seen passing in front of the Sun during a Solar Eclipse on August 21, 2017 at Roxbury High School in Roxbury, NJ. A total solar eclipse swept across a narrow portion of the contiguous United States from Lincoln Beach, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. A partial solar eclipse was visible across the entire North American continent along with parts of South America, Africa, and Europe. (Photo by Rich Graessle/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)
ROXBURY, NJ - AUGUST 21: The Moon is seen passing in front of the Sun during a Solar Eclipse on August 21, 2017 at Roxbury High School in Roxbury, NJ. A total solar eclipse swept across a narrow portion of the contiguous United States from Lincoln Beach, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. A partial solar eclipse was visible across the entire North American continent along with parts of South America, Africa, and Europe. (Photo by Rich Graessle/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)
The total solar eclipse Monday August 21, 2017 in Madras, Oregon. Emotional sky-gazers stood transfixed across North America Monday as the Sun vanished behind the Moon in a rare total eclipse that swept the continent coast-to-coast for the first time in nearly a century. / AFP PHOTO / ROB KERR (Photo credit should read ROB KERR/AFP/Getty Images)
A total solar eclipse is photographed from atop Carroll Rim Trail at Painted Hills, a unit of the John Day Fossil Beds National Monument, near Mitchell, Oregon, U.S. August 21, 2017. Location coordinates for this image is near 44�39'117'' N 120�6'042'' W. REUTERS/Adrees Latif
The solar eclipse creates the effect of a diamond ring at totality as seen from Clingmans Dome, which at 6,643 feet (2,025m) is the highest point in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Tennessee, U.S. August 21, 2017. Location coordinates for this image are 35�33'24" N, 83�29'46" W. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
A composite image of the total solar eclipse seen from the Lowell Observatory Solar Eclipse Experience August 21, 2017 in Madras, Oregon. / AFP PHOTO / STAN HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)
ILLINOIS, USA - AUGUST 21: (EDITORS NOTE: Multiple exposures were combined to produce this image) This composite image shows the progression of a solar eclipse near Illinois, United States on August 21, 2017. (Photo by Bilgin S. Sasmaz/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
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People in Seoul, South Korea, and Shanghai, China will be treated to the partial eclipse as well. The moon will obscure 35% and 20% of the sun in those cities, respectively. 

Even though the sun gets fully or partially blocked during an eclipse, you need glasses with special filters to watch the event without damaging your eyes, since the light that surrounds the moon is still intensely bright. Pinhole cameras are another good option. 

The next total solar eclipse will happen on July 2, 2019, and be visible to people in the South Pacific and South America. The next total solar eclipse that will be visible in North America won't come until April 8, 2024. Your next chance to see a total lunar eclipse (when the Earth passes in between the moon and the sun, casting a reddish shadow on the moon) will come on January 20, 2019. 

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SEE ALSO: See stunning photos of the longest 'blood moon' lunar eclipse of the century that swept across the Eastern Hemisphere

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