The Bin Laden family says Osama's youngest son went to Afghanistan to 'avenge' his father

  • The family of Osama Bin Laden, the infamous terrorist behind the September 11 attacks, finally spoke out about their family's dark legacy.
  • In an interview with The Guardian on Friday they said that extremism may still run in their family.
  • They said Bin Laden's youngest son, Hamza, has gone to Afghanistan to "avenge" his father.
  • They have mostly tried to live quiet lives away from the spotlight, but their extremist son could force them to relive the horrors of having a terrorist in the family. 

The family of Osama Bin Laden, the infamous terrorist behind the September 11, 2001 attacks, finally spoke out about their family's dark legacy in an interview with The Guardian on Friday — and they've revealed that the family's involvement with terrorism hasn't ended yet.

Living sheltered lives as a prominent but controversial family in their native Saudi Arabia, several of the family members opened up about Bin Laden's childhood, and his eventual transformation into one of the most notorious figures in recent history. 

But while Osama's career as a terrorist and Al Qaeda leader came to an end at the hands of US Navy SEALs in a midnight raid on his hideout in Pakistan, his militancy has taken root in his youngest child.

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US Senator Kelly Ayotte points to a photo of Sulaiman Abu Ghaith (L) during a press conference on Capitol Hill on March 7, 2013 in Washington, DC. Ayotte and US Senator Lindsey Graham spoke about the reported arrest of Sulaiman Abu Ghaith, the son-in-law of Osama Bin Laden, who was taken into custody in the Middle East and is now allegedly being held in New York. AFP PHOTO/Brendan SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
Media gather outside the Federal Courthouse in Manhattan March 8, 2013 in New York. Inside the court Osama bin Laden's son-in-law and former spokesman pleaded not guilty Friday to terrorism charges in New York, where he was brought a week ago after a top secret US operation. Sulaiman Abu Ghaith, reportedly a 47-year-old Kuwaiti and allegedly a senior propagandist in the Al-Qaeda network, is accused of conspiring 'to kill nationals of the United States.' AFP PHOTO/DON EMMERT (Photo credit should read DON EMMERT/AFP/Getty Images)
US Senator Lindsey Graham speaks during a press conference on Capitol Hill March 7, 2013 in Washington, DC. Graham spoke about the reported arrest of Sulaiman Abu Ghaith, the son-in-law of Osama Bin Laden, who was taken into custody in the Middle East and is now allegedly being held in New York. AFP PHOTO/Brendan SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
US Senator Kelly Ayotte (C) listens while Senator Lindsey Graham speaks during a press conference on Capitol Hill on March 7, 2013 in Washington, DC. The lawmakers spoke about the reported arrest of Sulaiman Abu Ghaith, the son-in-law of Osama Bin Laden, who was taken into custody in the Middle East and is now allegedly being held in New York. AFP PHOTO/Brendan SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
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Bin Laden's family believes his youngest son, Hamza, has followed in his father's footsteps by traveling to Afghanistan, where the US, Afghanistan's national army,  and NATO have been locked in a brutal war with Islamists since shortly after the Twin Towers came down. 

Hamza, officially designated a terrorist by the US, took his family by surprise with his endorsement of militant Islam. 

"We thought everyone was over this,” Hassan Bin Laden, an uncle of Hamza told The Guardian.

"Then the next thing I knew, Hamza was saying, 'I am going to avenge my father.' I don’t want to go through that again. If Hamza was in front of me now, I would tell him, ‘God guide you. Think twice about what you are doing. Don’t retake the steps of your father. You are entering horrible parts of your soul.'"

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U.S. President Barack Obama stands after addressing the nation on TV from the East Room of the White House to make a televised statement May 1, 2011 in Washington, DC. Bin Laden has been killed near Islamabad, Pakistan almost a decade after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001 and his body is in possession of the United States. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski-Pool/Getty Images)
In this handout image provided by The White House, President Barack Obama, Vice President Joe Biden, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and members of the national security team receive an update on the mission against Osama bin Laden in the Situation Room of the White House May 1, 2011 in Washington, DC. Obama later announced that the United States had killed Bin Laden in an operation led by U.S. Special Forces at a compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan. (Photo by Pete Souza/The White House via Getty Images)
A newspaper vendor displays papers heralding the death of Osama Bin Laden on May 2, 2011 in New York City. President Barack Obama announced the death of Osama bin Laden during a late night address to the nation from the White House in Washington on May 1. The mastermind of the September 11 terrorist attacks was killed in an American military operation at a compound in Pakistan. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
US Marines of Regiment Combat Team 1 (RCT 1) watch TV as President Barack Obama announces the death of Osama Bin Laden, at Camp Dwyer in Helman Province, on May 2, 2011. US President Barack Obama said on May 1, 2011 that justice had been done after the September 11, 2001 attacks with the death of Osama bin Laden, but warned that Al-Qaeda will still try to attack the US. (Photo by Bay Ismoyo via AFP/Getty Images)
People celebrate in Times Square after the death of accused 9-11 mastermind Osama bin Laden was announced by U.S. President Barack Obama May 2, 2011 in New York City. Bin Laden was killed in an operation by U.S. Navy Seals in a compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
Newspapers left by visitors grace the fence overlooking the crash site of Flight 93 following the announcement that Osama Bin Laden had been killed in Pakistan May 2, 2011 in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. Nearly 10 years after September 11, 2001 construction is underway to erect a formal memorial at the crash site. Last night U.S. President Barack Obama announced that the United States had killed the most-wanted terrorist Osama Bin Laden in an operation led by U.S. Special Forces in a compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan. (Photo by Jeff Swensen/Getty Images)
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After the September 11 attacks, some parts of Bin Laden's family remained in touch while others lead a quiet life under government and international intelligence agency supervision in Saudi Arabia, to which they are confined. 

Many of the Bin Ladens have sought to put their notorious history behind them by avoiding media and politics, but Hamza's embrace of his father's ideas means the family's brush with terrorism may have come back to haunt them.

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