Conor McGregor reaches plea deal on assault charges, gets community service

Nearly four months after Conor McGregor turned himself into the Brooklyn police, the 30-year-old MMA fighter returned to court Thursday to enter his plea and accept the punishment for his role in the April 5 brawl at the Barclays Center.

McGregor accepted a plea deal

McGregor and the Brooklyn District Attorney’s Office reached a deal that allows McGregor to avoid jail time completely, and required him to plead guilty to one count of disorderly conduct, serve community service, and attend anger management classes.

McGregor will also have to pay restitution for the damages to the bus. Cian Cowley, a fellow MMA fighter who was involved in the brawl and charged along with McGregor, also reached a plea deal.

According to ESPN, McGregor’s guilty plea for this deal will leave him with no criminal record and won’t affect his travel visa. If McGregor hadn’t reached a plea deal, he was facing 12 criminal charges and could have spent up to seven years in prison.

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Conor McGregor appears in court for hearing
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Conor McGregor appears in court for hearing
Mixed martial arts fighter Conor McGregor arrives at Brooklyn Supreme court in New York on June 14, 2018, for his hearing stemming from his April attack on a bus at Barclays Center. (Photo by TIMOTHY A. CLARY / AFP) (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)
MMA fighter Conor McGregor arrives at Brooklyn Supreme Court to face a hearing on assault charges in Brooklyn, New York, U.S., June 14, 2018. R. Umar Abbasi/Pool via REUTERS
MMA fighter Conor McGregor appears in Brooklyn Supreme Court during a hearing on assault charges in Brooklyn, New York, U.S., June 14, 2018. R. Umar Abbasi/Pool via REUTERS
MMA fighter Conor McGregor appears in Brooklyn Supreme Court during a hearing on assault charges in Brooklyn, New York, U.S., June 14, 2018. R. Umar Abbasi/Pool via REUTERS
MMA fighter Conor McGregor appears in Brooklyn Supreme Court during a hearing on assault charges in Brooklyn, New York, U.S., June 14, 2018. R. Umar Abbasi/Pool via REUTERS
NEW YORK, NY - JUNE 14: Conor McGregor arrives at Brooklyn Criminal Court in Brooklyn on June 14, 2018 in New York City. (Photo by Raymond Hall/GC Images)
NEW YORK, NY - JUNE 14: Conor McGregor appears at Brooklyn Criminal Court on June 14, 2018 in New York City. (Photo by Raymond Hall/GC Images)
Mixed martial arts fighter Conor McGregor leaves Brooklyn Supreme court in New York after his hearing on June 14, 2018, stemming from his April attack on a bus at Barclays Center. (Photo by TIMOTHY A. CLARY / AFP) (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)
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McGregor attacked a UFC team bus

All those possible charges stemmed from an incident that occurred just before UFC 223 in April. McGregor and several of his associates attacked a bus carrying UFC fighters and employees, and McGregor himself was caught on video throwing chairs and a guardrail into the bus. UFC fighters Michael Chiesa and Ray Borg both suffered minor injuries during the altercation, and were subsequently pulled from their upcoming fights at UFC 223.

McGregor surrendered to the police the next day, and was seen being led out of the precinct in handcuffs before he was arraigned and formally charged with three counts of misdemeanor assault and one count of felony criminal mischief, all of which have been dismissed as part of his plea deal.

McGregor hasn’t fought in the UFC since November 2016, and he was stripped of his lightweight title at UFC 223 due to inactivity. Taking a plea deal and avoiding jail time could allow him to return to fighting before the end of 2018.

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Liz Roscher is a writer for Yahoo Sports. Have a tip? Email her at lizroscher@yahoo.com or follow her on Twitter at @lizroscher.

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