Trump says agreed with EU to work to lower trade barriers

WASHINGTON, July 25 (Reuters) - U.S. President Donald Trump said on Wednesday the United States and the European Union were kicking off talks aimed at lowering trade barriers as officials looked to head off a brewing trade war.

SEE ALSO: Trump says he hopes to strike trade deal with Europe

"This was a very big day for free and fair trade, a very big day indeed," Trump told reporters at the White House after meeting with European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker.

"We are starting the negotiation right now but we know very much where it's going," Trump said.

Speaking with Juncker at his side, Trump said they had agreed in talks to "work together toward zero tariffs, zero non-tariff barriers, and zero subsidies on non-auto industrial goods."

"We will also work to reduce barriers and increase trade in services, chemicals, pharmaceuticals, medical products, as well as soybeans; soybeans is a big deal," he said, adding that Europe would also step up purchases of liquefied natural gas from the United States.

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Bruce Edler, 56, a farmer for 40 years, fills seed planters with soybean seed in Gideon, Missouri, U.S., May 16, 2018. Picture taken May 16, 2018. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
Farmer Jason Bean fills a soybean container at Bean and Bean Cotton Company in Gideon, Missouri, U.S., May 17, 2018. Picture taken May 17, 2018. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
Bruce Edler, 56, a farmer for 40 years, fills seed planters with soybean seed in Gideon, Missouri, U.S., May 16, 2018. Picture taken May 16, 2018. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
A soybean seeding tractor is replenished with soybean seeds in a field in Gideon, Missouri, U.S., May 16, 2018. Picture taken May 16, 2018. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
A soybean seeding tractor is replenished with soybean seeds in a field in Gideon, Missouri, U.S., May 16, 2018. Picture taken May 16, 2018. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
Carl Peterson, President of Peterson Farms and Seed, in his company's warehouse in Fargo, North Dakota, U.S., December 8, 2017. REUTERS/Dan Koeck
A worker takes a sample from an incoming truckload of soybeans at Peterson Farms Seed facility in Fargo, North Dakota, U.S., December 6, 2017. Photo taken December 6, 2017. REUTERS/Dan Koeck
A sample of clean, processed soybeans at Peterson Farms Seed facility in Fargo, North Dakota, U.S., December 6, 2017. Photo taken December 6, 2017. REUTERS/Dan Koeck
Samples of soybeans taken every hour during processing to monitor quality, are sorted for inspection at Peterson Farms Seed facility in Fargo, North Dakota, U.S., December 6, 2017. Photo taken December 6, 2017. REUTERS/Dan Koeck
Soybeans are sorted according to their weight and density on a gravity sorter machine at Peterson Farms Seed facility in Fargo, North Dakota, U.S., December 6, 2017. Photo take December 6, 2017. REUTERS/Dan Koeck
Technician Scott Guttormson checks the processing of soybeans on a gravity sorter at Peterson Farms Seed facility in Fargo, North Dakota, U.S., December 6, 2017. Photo taken December 6, 2017. REUTERS/Dan Koeck
Soybeans being sorted according to their weight and density on a gravity sorter machine at Peterson Farms Seed facility in Fargo, North Dakota, U.S., December 6, 2017. Photo taken December 6, 2017. REUTERS/Dan Koeck
A sample of soybeans sorted for inspection at Peterson Farms Seed facility in Fargo, North Dakota, U.S., December 6, 2017. Photo taken December 6, 2017. REUTERS/Dan Koeck
John Ziegler, plant manager at Peterson Farm Seed facility walks through a storage warehouse stacked with bulk tote bags of soybeans ready for shipment, in Fargo, North Dakota, U.S., December 6, 2017. Photo taken December 6, 2017. REUTERS/Dan Koeck
Soybeans grow in front of the Kentucky Utilities Ghent Generating Station, a coal-fired power-plant, along the Ohio River in Vevay, Indiana, U.S., September 22, 2017. Photograph taken at N38�45.502' W85�02.963'. Photograph taken September 22, 2017. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
John Weiss fears losing up to 50% of his soybean crops, which he had reported to the state board for showing signs of damage due to the drifting of Monsanto's pesticide Dicamba, at his farm in Dell, Arkansas, U.S. July 25, 2017. (Cotton is pictured behind him) Picture taken July 25, 2017. REUTERS/Karen Pulfer Focht
John Weiss pulls out some Pig Weed near his crop of soybeans, which he had reported to the state board for showing signs of damage due to the drifting of pesticide Dicamba, at his farm in Dell, Arkansas, U.S. July 25, 2017. Picture taken July 25, 2017. REUTERS/Karen Pulfer Focht
DWIGHT, IL - JUNE 13: Soybeans grow in a field on June 13, 2018 in Dwight, Illinois. The condition of U.S. corn and soybean crops in most regions is far outpacing last year's condition at this point in the season. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
DWIGHT, IL - JUNE 13: Soybeans grow in a field on June 13, 2018 in Dwight, Illinois. The condition of U.S. corn and soybean crops in most regions is far outpacing last year's condition at this point in the season. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
DWIGHT, IL - JUNE 13: Soybeans are loaded onto a truck before delivery to a grain elevator on June 13, 2018 near Dwight, Illinois. U.S. soybean futures plunged today with renewed fears that China could hit U.S. soybeans with retaliatory tariffs if the Trump administration follows through with threatened tariffs on Chinese goods. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
DWIGHT, IL - JUNE 13: Farmer John Duffy (R) and Roger Murphy load soybeans from a grain bin onto a truck before taking them to a grain elevator on June 13, 2018 in Dwight, Illinois. U.S. soybean futures plunged today with renewed fears that China could hit U.S. soybeans with retaliatory tariffs if the Trump administration follows through with threatened tariffs on Chinese goods. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
DWIGHT, IL - JUNE 13: Farmer John Duffy loads soybeans from his grain bin onto a truck before taking them to a grain elevator on June 13, 2018 in Dwight, Illinois. U.S. soybean futures plunged today with renewed fears that China could hit U.S. soybeans with retaliatory tariffs if the Trump administration follows through with threatened tariffs on Chinese goods. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
DWIGHT, IL - JUNE 13: Farmer John Duffy (L) and Roger Murphy load soybeans from a grain bin onto a truck before taking them to a grain elevator on June 13, 2018 in Dwight, Illinois. U.S. soybean futures plunged today with renewed fears that China could hit U.S. soybeans with retaliatory tariffs if the Trump administration follows through with threatened tariffs on Chinese goods. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
DWIGHT, IL - JUNE 13: Farmer John Duffy drives a load of soybeans to the grain elevator on June 13, 2018 in Dwight, Illinois. U.S. soybean futures plunged today with renewed fears that China could hit U.S. soybeans with retaliatory tariffs if the Trump administration follows through with threatened tariffs on Chinese goods. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
DWIGHT, IL - JUNE 13: Farmer John Duffy loads soybeans from his grain bin onto a truck before taking them to a grain elevator on June 13, 2018 in Dwight, Illinois. U.S. soybean futures plunged today with renewed fears that China could hit U.S. soybeans with retaliatory tariffs if the Trump administration follows through with threatened tariffs on Chinese goods. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
DWIGHT, IL - JUNE 13: Farmer John Duffy loads soybeans from his grain bin onto a truck before taking them to a grain elevator on June 13, 2018 in Dwight, Illinois. U.S. soybean futures plunged today with renewed fears that China could hit U.S. soybeans with retaliatory tariffs if the Trump administration follows through with threatened tariffs on Chinese goods. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
DWIGHT, IL - JUNE 13: Farmer John Duffy loads soybeans from his grain bin onto a truck before taking them to a grain elevator on June 13, 2018 in Dwight, Illinois. U.S. soybean futures plunged today with renewed fears that China could hit U.S. soybeans with retaliatory tariffs if the Trump administration follows through with threatened tariffs on Chinese goods. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
BLACKSTONE, IL - JUNE 13: Greg Lovins checks the quality of a load of soybeans being delivered to a Ruff Bros. Grain elevator on June 13, 2018 in Blackstone, Illinois. U.S. soybean futures plunged today with renewed fears that China could hit U.S. soybeans with retaliatory tariffs if the Trump administration follows through with threatened tariffs on Chinese goods. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Farmer Chris Crosskno watches as soy beans are loaded into his truck on Wednesday, Oct. 11, 2017, at his farm near Denton, Mo. Crosskno is busy harvesting all of his soy beans this month. (J.B. Forbes/St. Louis Post-Dispatch/TNS via Getty Images)
Farm worker Jamie Herron cuts and loads soy beans with his combine on Wednesday, Oct. 11, 2017, at Chris Crosskno's farm near Denton, Mo. Crosskno is busy harvesting all of his soy beans this month. (J.B. Forbes/St. Louis Post-Dispatch/TNS via Getty Images)
Truck driver Marion Howard watches soy beans load into his truck on Wednesday, Oct. 11, 2017, at Chris Crosskno's farm near Denton, Mo. Crosskno is busy harvesting all of his soy beans this month. (J.B. Forbes/St. Louis Post-Dispatch/TNS via Getty Images)
Soybeans are loaded into a truck during harvest in Princeton, Illinois, U.S., on Friday, Sept. 29, 2017. Soybean futures for November delivery rose 0.1% a bushel on the Chicago Board of Trade after falling as much as 0.5%, the lowest since September 13. Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Soybeans are loaded into a truck during harvest in Princeton, Illinois, U.S., on Friday, Sept. 29, 2017. Soybean futures for November delivery rose 0.1% a bushel on the Chicago Board of Trade after falling as much as 0.5%, the lowest since September 13. Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Harvested soybeans sit in a truck in Princeton, Illinois, U.S., on Friday, Sept. 29, 2017. Soybean futures for November delivery rose 0.1% a bushel on the Chicago Board of Trade after falling as much as 0.5%, the lowest since September 13. Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images
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"They are going to be a massive buyer of LNG," Trump said.

Trump said the talks would "resolve" both the hefty tariffs the United States had placed on imports of steel and aluminum from the EU and the tariffs Europe had slapped on U.S. goods in response.

It was not clear whether the two sides made any progress on the contentious issue of possible U.S. tariffs on imports of automobiles from Europe.

But Juncker said they had agreed not to impose any new tariffs while talks were taking place.

"This was a good and constructive meeting," Juncker said.

Trump has threatened to impose 25 percent tariffs on auto imports, a move that would hit European carmakers like BMW and Volkswagen hard, as well as Japanese and South Korean car companies. (Reporting by Steve Holland; Writing by Eric Beech; Editing by Tim Ahmann and James Dalgleish)

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