Former FBI chief Comey urges voters to support Democrats, rips Trump

Former FBI Director James Comey called on Americans to vote for Democrats in the wake of President Donald Trump's summit with Russian President Vladimir Putin, slamming Republicans for not pushing back against the president.

"This Republican Congress has proven incapable of fulfilling the Founders' design that 'Ambition must ... counteract ambition.' All who believe in this country's values must vote for Democrats this fall," he wrote in a Tuesday night tweet.

Comey, who was fired by Trump for his role in the Russian meddling investigation, pointedly condemned the president's summit and news conference with Putin on Monday, saying Trump had "sold out our nation on an international stage" and calling for "patriots" to "reject the behavior of this president."

"Policy differences don't matter right now," Comey wrote in the tweet. "History has its eyes on us."

RELATED: James Comey's life after President Trump fired him as FBI director

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James Comey's life after President Trump fired him as FBI director
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James Comey's life after President Trump fired him as FBI director
James Comey, former director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), speaks during an interview in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, May 8, 2018. Comey said he's 'disappointed and disgusted' with Republican attacks on Special Counsel Robert Mueller's Russia investigation, a campaign led by former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani since he became one of President Donald Trump's top lawyers. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Former FBI Director James Comey arrives to speak about his book "A Higher Loyalty" in New York, U.S., April 18, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Attendees collect their copies of former FBI director James Comey's book as they arrive to hear him speak at an onstage interview at George Washington University in Washington, U.S. April 30, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Former FBI Director James Comey is sworn in prior to testifying before a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on Russia's alleged interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., June 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 07: Former FBI director James Comey laughs while answering questions during an interview forum at the Washington Post May 8, 2018 in Washington, DC. Comey discussed his stormy tenure as head of the FBI, his handling of the Hillary Clinton email investigation, his tense relationship with President Trump and his controversial firing a year ago, during the forum. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
Former FBI Director James Comey arrives for a taping of "The Late Show with Stephen Colbert" in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S., April 17, 2018. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
Former FBI director James Comey speaks about his book during an onstage interview with Axios Executive Editor Mike Allen at George Washington University in Washington, U.S. April 30, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Former FBI Director James Comey testifies before a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on Russia's alleged interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., June 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Former Federal Bureau of Investigations Director James Comey departs after testifying before a closed session of the Senate Intelligence Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., U.S., June 8, 2017. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein
Former FBI Director James Comey testifies before a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on Russia's alleged interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., June 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 30: Former FBI Director James Comey talks onstage at George Washington University April 30, 3018 in Washington, DC. Comey discussed his new book 'Higher Loyalty: Truth, Lies, and Leadership.' (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Former FBI Director James Comey testifies before a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on "Russian Federation Efforts to Interfere in the 2016 U.S. Elections" on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S. June 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
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The president came under widespread, bipartisan condemnation on Monday and Tuesday for not backing his intelligence community's assessment that Moscow had interfered in the election. But GOP leaders in Congress have taken no action against Trump.

Comey was the head of the FBI until May of last year when the president fired him. Trump initially said he did so at the urging of the Justice Department because of Comey's handling of the Hillary Clinton email investigation during the 2016 election; days later, he told NBC News' Lester Holt that he was going to fire Comey anyway, and he was thinking about "this Russia thing" when he fired Comey.

Trump has repeatedly trashed Comey, who released a tell-all book earlier this year, calling him "slippery" and a liar in tweets.

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