Trump warns 'soft Brexit' plan might kill any US-British trade deal

President Donald Trump lashed out at British Prime Minister Theresa May’s “soft Brexit” blueprint upon his arrival in the United Kingdom on Thursday, saying that such a plan could destroy the chance of a trade deal with the United States.

Trump’s interview with British tabloid The Sun was published on the same day he arrived in London, shortly after May revealed plans for a still semi-cozy working relationship between the U.K. and the European Union even after Brexit is finalized. 

“If they do a deal like that, we would be dealing with the European Union instead of dealing with the UK, so it will probably kill the deal,” Trump told The Sun.

“We have enough difficulty with the European Union,” he said. “We are cracking down right now on the European Union because they have not treated the United States fairly on trading. No, if they do that, I would say that that would probably end a major trade relationship with the United States.”

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Demonstrators protest against the visit of U.S. President Donald Trump, in central London, Britain, July 13, 2018. REUTERS/Simon Dawson
Demonstrators protest against the visit of U.S. President Donald Trump, in central London, Britain, July 13, 2018. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls
Demonstrators protest against the visit of U.S. President Donald Trump, in central London, Britain, July 13, 2018. REUTERS/Yves Herman
Demonstrators protest against the visit of U.S. President Donald Trump, in central London, Britain, July 13, 2018. REUTERS/Simon Dawson
Demonstrators protest against the visit of U.S. President Donald Trump, in central London, Britain, July 13, 2018. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls
Demonstrators protest against the visit of U.S. President Donald Trump, in central London, Britain, July 13, 2018. REUTERS/Simon Dawson
Demonstrators protest against the visit of U.S. President Donald Trump, in central London, Britain, July 13, 2018. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls
Demonstrators protest against the visit of U.S. President Donald Trump, in central London, Britain, July 13, 2018. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls
Demonstrators protest against the visit of U.S. President Donald Trump, in central London, Britain, July 13, 2018. REUTERS/Simon Dawson
Demonstrators protest against the visit of U.S. President Donald Trump, in central London, Britain, July 13, 2018. REUTERS/Simon Dawson
Demonstrators protest against the visit of U.S. President Donald Trump, in central London, Britain, July 13, 2018. REUTERS/Simon Dawson
A demonstrator wearing a cap takes part in an anti-Trump protest in central London, Britain, July 13, 2018. REUTERS/Simon Dawson
A demonstrator carrying an anti-Trump billboard walks along a street during a protest in central London, Britain, July 13, 2018. REUTERS/Simon Dawson
A man who gave his name as Kevin (L) and was born in the USA but living in London for 21 years makes a protest against the visit of U.S. President Donald Trump outside Windsor Castle in Windsor, Britain July 13, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Coombs
Women, from a number of different protest groups, take part in an anti-Trump demonstration in central London, Britain, July 13, 2018. REUTERS/Simon Dawson
Women, from a number of different protest groups, take part in an anti-Trump demonstration in central London, Britain, July 13, 2018. REUTERS/Simon Dawson
Women, from a number of different protest groups, take part in an anti-Trump demonstration in central London, Britain, July 13, 2018. REUTERS/Simon Dawson
Women and men, from a number of different protest groups, take part in an anti-Trump demonstration in central London, Britain, July 13, 2018. REUTERS/Simon Dawson
A protester carries an umbrella during an anti-Trump demonstration in central London, Britain, July 13, 2018. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls
Women, from a number of different protest groups, take part in an anti-Trump demonstration in central London, Britain, July 13, 2018. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls
A balloon portraying U.S. President Donald Trump as a baby is attached to a man's rucksack during a protest in Parliament Square, during the visit by Trump and First Lady Melania Trump in London, Britain July 13, 2018. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls
Police officers talk to demonstrators preparing to protest in Parliament Square, during the visit by U.S. President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump in London, Britain July 13, 2018. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls
Police officers talk to demonstrators preparing to protest in Parliament Square, during the visit by U.S. President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump in London, Britain July 13, 2018. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls
Demonstrators prepare to protest in Parliament Square, during the visit by U.S. President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump in London, Britain July 13, 2018. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls
Pro-Trump demonstrators protest outside the grounds of Blenheim Palace, where U.S. President Donald Trump and the First Lady Melania Trump are attending a dinner with Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May and business leaders, near Oxford, Britain, July 12, 2018. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls
Demonstrators protest outside the grounds of Blenheim Palace, where U.S. President Donald Trump and the First Lady Melania Trump are attending a dinner with Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May and business leaders, near Oxford, Britain, July 12, 2018. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
Demonstrators protest outside the grounds of Blenheim Palace, where U.S. President Donald Trump and the First Lady Melania Trump are attending a dinner with Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May and business leaders, near Oxford, Britain, July 12, 2018. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
Demonstrators protest outside the grounds of Blenheim Palace, where U.S. President Donald Trump and the First Lady Melania Trump are attending a dinner with Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May and business leaders, near Oxford, Britain, July 12, 2018. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls
Demonstrators protest outside the grounds of Blenheim Palace, where U.S. President Donald Trump and the First Lady Melania Trump are attending a dinner with Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May and business leaders, near Oxford, Britain, July 12, 2018. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
Demonstrators protest outside the grounds of Blenheim Palace, where U.S. President Donald Trump and the First Lady Melania Trump are attending a dinner with Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May and business leaders, near Oxford, Britain, July 12, 2018. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls
Demonstrators protest outside the grounds of Blenheim Palace, where U.S. President Donald Trump and the First Lady Melania Trump are attending a dinner with Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May and business leaders, near Oxford, Britain, July 12, 2018. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls
Demonstrators protest next to the specially erected fence surrounding the U.S. ambassador's residence, Winfield House, where U.S. President Donald Trump and the First Lady Melania Trump are staying, in London, Britain, July 12, 2018. REUTERS/Simon Dawson
Demonstrators protest next to the specially erected fence surrounding the U.S. ambassador's residence, Winfield House, where U.S. President Donald Trump and the First Lady Melania Trump are staying, in London, Britain, July 12, 2018. REUTERS/Simon Dawson
Demonstrators protest next to the specially erected fence surrounding the U.S. ambassador's residence, Winfield House, where U.S. President Donald Trump and the First Lady Melania Trump are staying, in London, Britain, July 12, 2018. REUTERS/Simon Dawson
Demonstrators protest next to the specially erected fence surrounding the U.S. ambassador's residence, Winfield House, where U.S. President Donald Trump and the First Lady Melania Trump are staying, in London, Britain, July 12, 2018. REUTERS/Simon Dawson
Demonstrators protest next to the specially erected fence surrounding the U.S. ambassador's residence, Winfield House, where U.S. President Donald Trump and the First Lady Melania Trump are staying, in London, Britain, July 12, 2018. REUTERS/Simon Dawson
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May’s plan ― which isn’t going over well with Brexit supporters in the U.K. either ― would be to sign an “Association Agreement” with the EU that involves stronger ties than a traditional free-trade deal. The U.K. would agree to abide by the EU’s rulebook for goods and agricultural products in return for not losing its open customs borders with the union. (It’s not clear what EU leaders think of the idea.)

Trump also lamented in the interview that May had ignored his advice on how to proceed with Brexit, for which the British voted in 2016.

“I would have done it much differently. I actually told Theresa May how to do it but she didn’t agree, she didn’t listen to me,” he said.

This article originally appeared on HuffPost.

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