Fox News host Howard Kurtz criticizes his network for 'barely' covering Scott Pruitt's resignation

  • Fox News host Howard Kurtz pushed back on his own panelists who blamed media bias for former Environmental Protection Agency chief Scott Pruitt's resignation last week. 
  • Kurtz suggested that his own network, in fact, displayed bias by "barely" covering Pruitt's ouster amid more than a dozen investigations into his conduct at the EPA.

Fox News host Howard Kurtz pushed back on his own show's panelists who blamed media bias for former Environmental Protection Agency chief Scott Pruitt's resignation last week

Instead of siding with his conservative-leaning guests, Kurtz said his network had failed to adequately cover the administrator's resignation last Thursday amid more than a dozen federal investigations into his conduct at the agency. 

"Pruitt's resignation was barely covered on Fox in primetime or early the next morning ... and I think that was a mistake," Kurtz said on his Sunday program, adding that he spoke about the administrator's exit on Fox opinion host Laura Ingraham's show. (Ingraham, a prominent right-wing personality, publicly called for Pruitt to be fired just days before his ouster). 

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TV news anchor Howard Kurtz speaks to members of the media in the lobby of Trump Tower in New York, U.S., on Monday, Jan. 8, 2017. A marathon of Senate confirmation hearings starting this week will give Democrats the chance to put Donald Trump's Cabinet nominees on trial even though they have little chance of actually blocking any of them. Photographer: Albin Lohr-Jones/Pool via Bloomberg
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Media Reporter for The Washington Post and Host of CNN Reliable Sources Howard Kurtz speaks during CNN's Media Conference For The Election of the President 2008 at the Time Warner Center on October 14, 2008 in New York City. 16949_4051.JPG (Photo by Joe Kohen/WireImage)
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 21: Howard Kurtz speaks at the American News Women's Club 2013 Gala Award luncheon at The National Press Club on June 21, 2013 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Paul Morigi/Getty Images)
Tina Brown and Howard Kurtz arrive at a red carpet event hosted by Google and the Hollywood Reporter on the eve of the annual White House Correspondents? Association dinner in Washington on April 27, 2012. AFP PHOTO / Nicholas KAMM (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/GettyImages)
NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 25: Howard Kurtz attends the premiere of 'Knife Fight' during the 2012 Tribeca Film Festival at BMCC Tribeca PAC on April 25, 2012 in New York City. (Photo by Gilbert Carrasquillo/FilmMagic)
Media Reporter for The Washington Post and Host of CNN Reliable Sources Howard Kurtz speaks during CNN's Media Conference For The Election of the President 2008 at the Time Warner Center on October 14, 2008 in New York City. 16949_4135.JPG (Photo by Joe Kohen/WireImage)
Media Reporter for The Washington Post and Host of CNN Reliable Sources Howard Kurtz speaks during CNN's Media Conference For The Election of the President 2008 at the Time Warner Center on October 14, 2008 in New York City. 16949_4180.JPG *** Local Caption ***
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 18: CNN Anchor John King and guest Howard Kurtz discuss the inauguration during the first episode of his new sunday morning political show 'State of the Union' from on top of the Newseum on January 18, 2009 in Washington, DC. Kurtz is the host of Reliable Sources on CNN and has written for The New Republic, the Washington Monthly, and New York Magazine. (Photo by David S. Holloway/Getty Images)
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Two conservative panelists on Kurtz's show argued that reporters at The New York Times, The Washington Post, and elsewhere were motivated to conduct the investigative journalism that exposed dozens of allegations of Pruitt's unethical behavior by their personal opposition to the Cabinet secretary's conservative policy agenda. 

Pruitt "was trying to take apart the Obama-era EPA regulations and he accomplished a lot of that, and I think that fueled the investigatory desires of journalists to try to take him down, and outside groups and people within the EPA to try to take him out for that very reason," said The Washington Examiner's Susan Ferrechio. "He made himself a very easy target, clearly. But he would not have been the same level of target if he had a different job within the administration."

Mollie Hemingway, an opinion writer at the conservative website The Federalist, added that Pruitt's unusual living arrangement, in which he paid $50 a night to rent a DC condo owned by the wife of an energy lobbyist, was approved by the EPA's ethics office. 

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Notable people who have been fired or resigned from Trump's administration
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Notable people who have been fired or resigned from Trump's administration

White House Communications Director Hope Hicks reportedly announced her resignation after testifying about her job and being required to tell "white lies."

(Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Scott Pruitt resigned from his position on July 5, 2018 after a number of ethics scandals.

(REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst)

Rob Porter resigned as White House staff secretary in February 2018 amid abuse allegations made by his ex-wives.

(REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst)

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson was fired by President Trump in March 2018.

(Joshua Roberts/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

H.R. McMaster was replaced by John Bolton as national security advisor in March 2018.

(Photo by Kevin Dietsch-Pool/Getty Images)

White House aide Kelly Sadler left her position in June 2018 after reportedly mocking Sen. John McCain.

(REUTERS/Leah Millis)

Director of the National Economic Council Gary Cohn announced his resignation in March 2018 after becoming a key architect of the 2017 tax overhaul 

(REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein)

Sally Yates was fired from her post as acting attorney general when she refused to enforce President Trump's travel ban. 

(Photo by Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

Michael Flynn resigned as national security adviser in February after misleading Vice President Mike Pence about his interactions with Russian officials. 

(REUTERS/Carlos Barria)

President Trump announced David Shulkin was out as secretary of veterans affairs by sending a tweet announcing he had nominated his personal physican, Ronny Jackson, to replace him on March 28, 2018.

(Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Trump fired FBI Director James Comey in early May.

(REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst)

Former White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer resigned in July.

(June 20, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst)

Former White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus resigned in July.

(REUTERS/Joshua Roberts)

Former advisor to President Donald Trump Steve Bannon resigned in August.

(Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Anthony Scaramucci, former White House communications director was fired in July after just 10 days on the job. 

(Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

Trump fired Deputy Chief of Staff Katie Walsh amid White House leaks in April.

(REUTERS/Carlos Barria/Files)

Former Secretary of Health and Human Services Tom Price resigned in late September. 

(Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

White House aide Omarosa Manigault insists she resigned and was not fired from her role in December 2017.

(Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

President Trump fired U.S. Attorney in Manhattan Preet Bharara in March.

(REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein)

Mike Dubke resigned as White House communications director in late May.

(Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

Walter Shaub, former Director of the United States Office of Government Ethics in Washington, DC resigned in July.

(Photo Linda Davidson/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

White House deputy assistant Sebastian Gorka resigned in August 2017. 

(REUTERS/Joshua Roberts)

Rick Dearborn, White House Deputy Chief of Staff for Legislative Affairs, left the White House in December 2017.

(REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein)

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The same senior ethics official later called for new probes into Pruitt's activities and allegations that he abused his government position and misused taxpayer money. 

Kurtz has long criticized Pruitt's ethically questionable activities, which included directing government employees to assist him with personal chores and spending copious government funds on luxury travel and security.

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