Hope Hicks reportedly told friends she wouldn't return to the White House this year, even if Trump asked

  • Hope Hicks told friends she wouldn't go back to the White House this year, even if the president asked, The Daily Beast reported.
  • Hicks resigned from her post as White House communications director in February, but is said to be a potential replacement for Trump's chief of staff John Kelly.
  • Trump responded to return rumors and reiterated their good relationship, telling reporters, "I love Hope."

Hope Hicks told friends she wouldn't return to the White House this year, even if President Donald Trump asked her to, The Daily Beast reported.

Several of Hicks' friends told The Daily Beast that she has ruled out becoming Trump's next potential chief of staff for at least the rest of 2018, despite rumors her name is being floated for the position.

Hicks resigned from her post as White House communications director in February after she testified before the House Intelligence Committee as part of its investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election. Hicks admitted she told "white lies" for Trump on occasion, but said she never lied about anything concerning the investigation.

The 29-year-old Hicks had reportedly been planning to leave for months, and despite a rocky time in the spotlight, several members of the Trump administration wished her well upon her resignation.

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Hope Hicks attends meeting with House Intelligence Committee
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Hope Hicks attends meeting with House Intelligence Committee
White House Communications Director Hope Hicks leaves after attending the House Intelligence Committee closed door meeting at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S., February 27, 2018. REUTERS/Leah Millis
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 27: White House Communications Director and presidential advisor Hope Hicks (L) arrives at the U.S. Capitol Visitors Center February 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. Hicks is scheduled to testify behind closed doors to the House Intelligence Committee in its ongoing investigation into Russia's interference in the 2016 election. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
White House Communications Director Hope Hicks (R) leaves the U.S. Capitol with her lawyer Robert Trout after attending the House Intelligence Committee closed door meeting in Washington, U.S., February 27, 2018. REUTERS/Leah Millis
White House Communications Director Hope Hicks leaves the U.S. Capitol after attending the House Intelligence Committee closed door meeting in Washington, U.S., February 27, 2018. REUTERS/Leah Millis
White House Communications Director Hope Hicks leaves the U.S. Capitol after attending the House Intelligence Committee closed door meeting in Washington, U.S., February 27, 2018. REUTERS/Leah Millis
White House Communications Director Hope Hicks leaves after attending the House Intelligence Committee closed door meeting at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S., February 27, 2018. REUTERS/Leah Millis TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 27: White House Communications Director and presidential advisor Hope Hicks (L) arrives at the U.S. Capitol Visitors Center February 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. Hicks is scheduled to testify behind closed doors to the House Intelligence Committee in its ongoing investigation into Russia's interference in the 2016 election. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
White House Communications Director Hope Hicks leaves after attending the House Intelligence Committee closed door meeting at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S., February 27, 2018. REUTERS/Leah Millis
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 27: White House Communications Director and presidential advisor Hope Hicks (L) arrives at the U.S. Capitol Visitors Center February 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. Hicks is scheduled to testify behind closed doors to the House Intelligence Committee in its ongoing investigation into Russia's interference in the 2016 election. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
White House Communications Director Hope Hicks warns a camera man away from tripping as she leaves the U.S. Capitol after attending the House Intelligence Committee closed door meeting in Washington, U.S., February 27, 2018. REUTERS/Leah Millis
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 27: White House Communications Director and presidential advisor Hope Hicks arrives at the U.S. Capitol Visitors Center February 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. Hicks is scheduled to testify behind closed doors to the House Intelligence Committee in its ongoing investigation into Russia's interference in the 2016 election. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
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Trump himself lent credence to the rumors of Hicks' return to the White House, expressing support for the idea in front of the press last month.

"I love Hope. She’s great. I hope that — I’ve been hearing little things like that," Trump told reporters on June 29. "I think everybody misses it. When they leave for a little while, you [in the press] exhaust a lot of people … They come in full of life, full of vigor, and they’re exhausted, and then they get their breath. Frankly, Hope is great and so are many of the other people and they went out. But many people would like to come back."

Hicks was widely reported to be Trump's most trusted adviser after years working for the Trump Organization. She was said to have more access to Trump than almost any other member of the president's staff.

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Notable people who have been fired or resigned from Trump's administration
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Notable people who have been fired or resigned from Trump's administration

Attorney General Jeff Sessions

(AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

White House Communications Director Hope Hicks reportedly announced her resignation after testifying about her job and being required to tell "white lies."

(Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson was fired by President Trump in March 2018.

(Joshua Roberts/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

White House aide Omarosa Manigault insists she resigned and was not fired from her role in December 2017.

(Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Scott Pruitt resigned from his position on July 5, 2018 after a number of ethics scandals.

(REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst)

Sally Yates was fired from her post as acting attorney general when she refused to enforce President Trump's travel ban. 

(Photo by Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

Rob Porter resigned as White House staff secretary in February 2018 amid abuse allegations made by his ex-wives.

(REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst)

White House Counsel Don McGahn

(Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

H.R. McMaster was replaced by John Bolton as national security advisor in March 2018.

(Photo by Kevin Dietsch-Pool/Getty Images)

White House aide Kelly Sadler left her position in June 2018 after reportedly mocking Sen. John McCain.

(REUTERS/Leah Millis)

Director of the National Economic Council Gary Cohn announced his resignation in March 2018 after becoming a key architect of the 2017 tax overhaul 

(REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein)

Michael Flynn resigned as national security adviser in February after misleading Vice President Mike Pence about his interactions with Russian officials. 

(REUTERS/Carlos Barria)

President Trump announced David Shulkin was out as secretary of veterans affairs by sending a tweet announcing he had nominated his personal physican, Ronny Jackson, to replace him on March 28, 2018.

(Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Trump fired FBI Director James Comey in early May.

(REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst)

Former White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer resigned in July.

(June 20, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst)

Former White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus resigned in July.

(REUTERS/Joshua Roberts)

Former advisor to President Donald Trump Steve Bannon resigned in August.

(Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Anthony Scaramucci, former White House communications director was fired in July after just 10 days on the job. 

(Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

Trump fired Deputy Chief of Staff Katie Walsh amid White House leaks in April.

(REUTERS/Carlos Barria/Files)

Former Secretary of Health and Human Services Tom Price resigned in late September. 

(Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

President Trump fired U.S. Attorney in Manhattan Preet Bharara in March.

(REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein)

Mike Dubke resigned as White House communications director in late May.

(Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

Walter Shaub, former Director of the United States Office of Government Ethics in Washington, DC resigned in July.

(Photo Linda Davidson/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

White House deputy assistant Sebastian Gorka resigned in August 2017. 

(REUTERS/Joshua Roberts)

Rick Dearborn, White House Deputy Chief of Staff for Legislative Affairs, left the White House in December 2017.

(REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein)

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The president and Hicks have reportedly kept in touch since her departure. A White House official told the Daily Beast Trump had his staff send Hicks a dictated message "wishing her well in her future endeavors and expressing that he missed her."

Read the full report here »

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