Embattled EPA chief Scott Pruitt reportedly lobbied Trump to fire Jeff Sessions so he could run the Justice Department

  • Environmental Protection Agency administrator Scott Pruitt reportedly lobbied President Donald Trump to fire Attorney General Jeff Sessions and temporarily appoint him to run the Justice Department.
  • According to a CNN report published Tuesday night, Pruitt wanted to run the DOJ temporarily under the Vacancies Reform Act, which would have allowed him to stay in the post for as many as 210 days. He would return to Oklahoma to run for office.
  • Pruitt reportedly appealed to Trump in the spring and asked to replace the attorney general for 210 days under the Vacancies Reform Act, after which he would return to his home state of Oklahoma and run for office.
  • Trump's advisers reportedly balked at Pruitt's suggestion, even though it came around the same time Trump was publicly railing against Sessions for recusing himself from the Russia investigation.

Environmental Protection Agency administrator Scott Pruitt reportedly lobbied President Donald Trump to fire Attorney General Jeff Sessions and temporarily appoint him to run the Justice Department.

According to a CNN report published Tuesday night, Pruitt wanted to run the DOJ temporarily under the Vacancies Reform Act, which would have allowed him to stay in the post for as many as 210 days. He would return to Oklahoma to run for office.

Trump's advisers reportedly balked at Pruitt's suggestion, even though it came at a time when Trump was publicly railing against Sessions for recusing himself from the Russia investigation.

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Questionable spending by past and present members of Trump's team
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Questionable spending by past and present members of Trump's team

Scott Pruitt

  • $163,000 in flights

Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt reportedly spent $163,000 in taxpayer money on first-class, military and charter flights during his first year in office. 

(Photo by Pete Marovich/Getty Images)

Scott Pruitt

  • $50/night condo

EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt reportedly lived in a Washington, D.C. condo that is co-owned by the wife of an energy lobbyist. The $50-a-night deal is much cheaper than the market-rate rents in the area.

 (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Ben Carson

  • $31,000 dining set

Secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development Ben Carson bought a $31,000 dining set for his office. His office later canceled the order following backlash. 

(REUTERS/Rebecca Cook)

Tom Price

  • $52,000 private charter flights

Tom Price resigned as health and human services secretary in September 2017 following outrage over his travel on private charter planes. He promised to repay the money saying, "the taxpayers won’t pay a dime for my seat on those planes."

(REUTERS/Joshua Roberts)

Ryan Zinke

  • Travel budget

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke was reportedly on track to be $200,000 over his travel budget.

(REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque)

Ryan Zinke

  • $6,250 on helicopter ride

Zinke also reportedly spent thousand of dollars in taxpayer money on a government helicopter ride so he could go horseback riding with Vice President Mike Pence. 

(REUTERS/Joshua Roberts)

Ryan Zinke

  • $139,000 office doors

The U.S. Department of Interior spent $139,000 to fix three sets of doors in Secretary Ryan Zinke's office, according to Reuters. The steep price tag was blamed on rules for historic preservation and procurement.

(Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

David Shulkin

  • Canal cruise with wife

The former Secretary of Veterans Affairs David Shulkin and his wife, Merle Bari, allegedly watched tennis matches at Wimbledon and enjoyed a river cruise during a work trip to London and Copenhagen.

(Sean Zanni/Patrick McMullan via Getty Images)

Steven Mnuchin

  • $1 million on military aircraft

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin reportedly spent mass amounts of taxpayer money on several trips including a flight to Kentucky where he viewed the solar eclipse. He also requested a military plane for his honeymoon with wife Louise Linton, according to Vanity Fair.

(Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

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Rumors of Pruitt eyeing Sessions's spot circulated around Capitol Hill earlier this year: "Pruitt is very interested," a person close to Pruitt said in January, according to Politico. "He has expressed that on a number of occasions."

In April, Trump denied the rumors on Twitter

News of Pruitt's request to Trump comes amid a series of scandals involving the administrator. In another CNN report published Monday, a whistleblower claimed Pruitt had kept "secret" calendars to hide "controversial meetings" and phone calls with industry representatives.

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Former Director of Environmental Protection Agency Scott Pruitt
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Former Director of Environmental Protection Agency Scott Pruitt

Scott Pruitt, administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), speaks to employees of the Agency in Washington, U.S., February 21, 2017.

(REUTERS/Joshua Roberts)

Scott Pruitt, administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), greets employees of the agency in Washington, U.S., February 21, 2017.

(REUTERS/Joshua Roberts)

Director of Environmental Protection Agency Scott Pruitt is sworn in by Justice Samuel Alito as his wife Marilyn holds a bible during ceremony at the Executive Office in Washington, U.S., February 17, 2017.

(REUTERS/Carlos Barria)

Scott Pruitt, administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), greets employees of the agency in Washington, U.S., February 21, 2017.

(REUTERS/Joshua Roberts)

Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt, U.S. President-elect Donald Trump's pick as head of the Environmental Protectional Agency, meets with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell in his office on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., January 6, 2017.

(REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein)

Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt testifies before a Senate Environment and Public Works Committee confirmation hearing on his nomination to be administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency in Washington, U.S., January 18, 2017.

(REUTERS/Joshua Roberts)

Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt (R), U.S. President-elect Donald Trump's pick to lead the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), meets with Senator Shelley Moore Capito (R-WV) (L) in her office on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S. January 4, 2017.

(REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst)

Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt, U.S. President-elect Donald Trump's pick as head of the Environmental Protectional Agency, meets with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell in his office on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., January 6, 2017.

(REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein)

Oklahoma Farm Bureau Vice President of Public Policy John R.H. Collison (L) meets with Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt (R) to discuss state water issues at the attorney generals office in Oklahoma City, July 29, 2014.

(REUTERS/Nick Oxford)

Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt in a meeting at his office in Oklahoma City, July 29, 2014. 

(REUTERS/Nick Oxford)

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Trump appeared to be aware of Pruitt's alleged actions, but said the administrator was doing a "fantastic job" at the EPA.

"I'm not happy about certain things," Trump said in June. "But he's done a fantastic job running the EPA, which is very overriding. But I am not happy about it."

Pruitt served as Oklahoma's attorney general for six year, and prior to that, the Oklahoma State Senate.

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