Report: Officials considering second Trump-Kim Jong Un summit in New York

Weeks after President Trump’s historic summit with North Korea’s leader Kim Jong-un, Axios is reporting that the two leaders may meet again – this time “in New York in September, when world leaders pour into Trump’s hometown for the U.N. General Assembly.”

Axios adds: “Officials tell us that Kim would have to show progress for the meeting to occur. One possibility would be for Trump to hold out a Round 2 meeting as a carrot to encourage real movement by North Korea over the summer.”

This news comes after Trump recently floated the possibility that the deal he struck with Kim may not “work out.”

During an interview with Fox News’ Maria Bartiromo, Trump said about Kim: “I made a deal with him, I shook hands with him. I really believe he means it. Now, is it possible––have I been in deals, have you been in things where people didn’t work out? It’s possible.”

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But in general, Trump seemed optimistic about the country, saying, “I really believe North Korea has a tremendous future. I got along really well with Chairman Kim. We had a great chemistry.”

While the exact details of their deal are unknown, Trump tweeted after the June 12 summit, in part, “…everybody can now feel much safer than the day I took office. There is no longer a Nuclear Threat from North Korea. Meeting with Kim Jong Un was an interesting and very positive experience. North Korea has great potential for the future!”

However, NBC News is reporting, based on inside sources, that “U.S. intelligence agencies believe that North Korea has increased its production of fuel for nuclear weapons at multiple secret sites in recent months — and that Kim Jong Un may try to hide those facilities as he seeks more concessions in nuclear talks with the Trump administration.”

“There is absolutely unequivocal evidence that they are trying to deceive the U.S,” one official was quoted as saying about the regime.

Amid such reports, national security adviser John Bolton has admitted to North Korea’s spotty history with negotiations but expressed confidence that mechanisms and incentives are in place for the country to follow through.