Trump rails against lawmaker for Russia investigation comments possibly made 'in a near drunken state'

  • President Donald Trump railed against comments made in jest by Sen. Mark Warner of Virginia.
  • During a fundraising retreat at Martha's Vineyard, Warner reportedly joked that if he had "one more glass of wine," he might reveal information on the Russia investigation that only he and special counsel Robert Mueller knew.
  • Trump suggested Warner's comments could have been made "in a near drunken state."


President Donald Trump railed against comments about the Russia investigation made in jest by Democratic Sen. Mark Warner of Virginia and suggested they could have been made "in a near drunken state."

"Why is Senator Mark Warner (D-VA), perhaps in a near drunken state, claiming he has information that only he and Bob Mueller, the leader of the 13 Angry Democrats on a Witch Hunt, knows," Trump tweeted. "Isn't this highly illegal. Is it being investigated?"

Trump was referring to Warner's comments made during a Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee retreat at Martha's Vineyard on Friday evening.

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Committee Vice Chairman and ranking member Senator Mark Warner addresses U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions testifies before a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., June 13, 2017.

(REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein)

U.S. Senator Mark Warner (D-VA) (L) takes note of the "I Voted" sticker worn by Senator Charles Schumer (D-NY) to mark his participation in New York primary elections, at a Senate Banking Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington September 9, 2014.

(REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst)

Sen Mark Warner, (D-VA), Vice Chairman of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, looks over his papers before delivering a speech on the floor of the U.S. Senate about the future of Special Counsel Robert Mueller's investigation.

(Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Sen. Mark Warner (D-VA) speaks with reporters at the U.S. Capitol after delivering a speech on the floor of the U.S. Senate December 20, 2017 in Washington, DC. Warner, the ranking member of the Senate Intelligence Committee, spoke on speculation that special counsel Robert Mueller may be fired.

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Sen. Richard Burr (R-NC), accompanied by Sen. Mark Warner (D-VA), gives an update on the ongoing investigation into Russian involvement in the 2016 election at the Capitol Building in Washington, U.S., October 4, 2017.

(REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein)

Sen. Mark Warner (D-VA) speaks at Ralph Northam's election night rally on the campus of George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia, November 7, 2017.

(REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein)

Senator Mark Warner (D-VA) speaks to reporters ahead of the weekly party luncheons on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., August 1, 2017.

(REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein)

Sen. Mark Warner (D-VA) meets with Christopher Wray, who U.S. President Donald Trump has nominated to be FBI Director, on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., July 13, 2017.

REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein

Senate Intelligence Committee ranking member Mark Warner (D0VA) asks questions during former FBI Director James Comey's appearance before a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on Russia's alleged interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., June 8, 2017.

REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein

Committee Vice Chairman and ranking member Senator Mark Warner (L) and Chairman Richard Burr (R) listen as U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions testifies before a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., June 13, 2017.

REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein

Committee Vice Chairman and ranking member Senator Mark Warner questions U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions during a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., June 13, 2017.

(REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein)

U.S. Senator Mark Warner (D-VA) (from L), Senator Joe Manchin (D-WV) and Senator Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) arrive for a procedural vote on defense spending authorization legislation at the U.S. Capitol in Washington December 11, 2014.

(REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst)

Senate Intelligence Committee Chairman Richard Burr (L) and ranking member Senator Mark Warner (R) speak about former White House national security adviser Michael Flynn following a Senate Select Committee on Intelligence briefing on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., May 23, 2017.

(REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque)

Senate Intelligence Committee Chairman Sen. Richard Burr (R-NC), accompanied by Senator Mark Warner (D-VA), vice chairman of the committee, speaks at a news conference to discuss their probe of Russian interference in the 2016 election on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., U.S., March 29, 2017.

(REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein)

U.S. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) listens to Senator Mark Warner (D-VA) speaking to the media following the emergency caucus meeting on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., February 15, 2017.

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Sen Mark Warner, (D-VA), Vice Chairman of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, looks over his papers as he walks to the Senate Chamber to deliver a speech about the future of Special Counsel Robert Mueller's investigation.

(Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

U.S. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (L) and U.S. Senator Mark Warner wait to take pictures with phones of U.S. President Barack Obama as he disembarks from Air Force One at Air Force Station Palam in New Delhi January 25, 2015. In a fresh bid to make India an enduring strategic partner, Obama landed in New Delhi on Sunday for a highly symbolic visit and to nurture friendship with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, who a year ago was persona non grata in Washington. Obama is visiting India for three days to attend India's Republic Day celebrations and meet with Indian leaders. Pelosi and Warner accompanied Obama to India aboard Air Force One.

(REUTERS/Jim Bourg)

Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-NY), (C), chats with Sen. Mark Warner (D-VA), (L), who is attending his first Finance Committee hearing and Sen. Robert P. Casey, Jr. prior to U.S. Treasury Secretary Jack Lew testifying on President Obama's Fiscal Year 2015 Budget, on Capitol Hill, in Washington, March 5, 2014. Obama is sending a $3.9 trillion budget to Congress, seeking new spending for economic growth, higher taxes on the wealthy and looking to resolve immigration issues.

(REUTERS/Mike Theiler)

Senator Mark Warner (D-VA) speaks at a news conference to discuss the committee's probe of Russian interference in the 2016 election on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., U.S., March 29, 2017.

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Warner, the vice chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, jokingly said that he might disclose information on the ongoing Russian investigation that only he and special counsel Robert Mueller were privy to.

"If you get me one more glass of wine, I'll tell you stuff only Bob Mueller and I know," Warner said, according to Politico.

"If you think you've seen wild stuff so far, buckle up," Warner added. "It's going to be a wild couple of months."

Warner later admitted his comments were "a bad joke," according to The Washington Examiner: "You know how seriously I take this investigation," Warner said. "We're going to follow the facts."

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