Robert Mueller has obtained Trump-connected military contractor Erik Prince's computer and phones

Trump-connected military contractor Erik Prince has turned over his phones and computer to Robert Mueller, a representative for Prince said Monday, signaling the special counsel’s interest in a backchannel he allegedly tried to broker between the White House and the Kremlin.

Prince, whose since-defunct Blackwater company is infamous for its role in the killing of 17 Iraqi civilians in 2007, acknowledged last week he has “cooperated” with Mueller’s investigators as they continue to probe possible collusion between President Trump’s campaign and the Russian government.

On Monday, a spokesman for Prince confirmed he has also provided Mueller’s team with “total access to his phones and computer.”

“Mr. Prince has a lot of opinions about the various investigations, but there is no question that they are important and serious, and so Mr. Prince will keep his opinions to himself for now and let the investigators do their work,” the spokesman told the Daily News. “All we will add is that much of the reporting and speculation about Mr. Prince in the media is inaccurate, and we are confident that when the investigators have finished their work, we will be able to put these distractions aside.”

ABC News first reported Prince handing over his electronics to Mueller’s team.

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Blackwater USA Chief Executive Erik Prince testifies before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee on security contracting in Iraq and Afghanistan on Capitol Hill in Washington October 2, 2007. REUTERS/Larry Downing (UNITED STATES)
Blackwater Chief Executive Erik Prince testifies before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee on security contracting in Iraq and Afghanistan on Capitol Hill in Washington, October 2, 2007. Blackwater, under investigation over deadly incidents in Iraq, defended its role on Tuesday, but lawmakers took aim at the company's actions in a Sept. 16 shooting in which 11 Iraqis were killed. REUTERS/Larry Downing (UNITED STATES)
Blackwater USA Chief Executive Erik Prince swears in before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee on security contracting in Iraq and Afghanistan on Capitol Hill in Washington October 2, 2007. REUTERS/Larry Downing (UNITED STATES)
Blackwater Chief Executive Erik Prince testifies before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee on security contracting in Iraq and Afghanistan on Capitol Hill in Washington, October 2, 2007. Blackwater, under investigation over deadly incidents in Iraq, defended its role on Tuesday, but lawmakers took aim at the company's actions in a Sept. 16 shooting in which 11 Iraqis were killed. REUTERS/Larry Downing (UNITED STATES)
Blackwater Chief Executive Erik Prince testifies before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee on security contracting in Iraq and Afghanistan on Capitol Hill in Washington, October 2, 2007. Blackwater, under investigation over deadly incidents in Iraq, defended its role on Tuesday, but lawmakers took aim at the company's actions in a Sept. 16 shooting in which 11 Iraqis were killed. REUTERS/Larry Downing (UNITED STATES)
Blackwater Chief Executive Erik Prince testifies before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee on security contracting in Iraq and Afghanistan on Capitol Hill in Washington, October 2, 2007. Blackwater, under investigation over deadly incidents in Iraq, defended its role on Tuesday, but lawmakers took aim at the company's actions in a Sept. 16 shooting in which 11 Iraqis were killed. REUTERS/Larry Downing (UNITED STATES)
Blackwater Chief Executive Erik Prince testifies before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee on security contracting in Iraq and Afghanistan on Capitol Hill in Washington, October 2, 2007. Blackwater, under investigation over deadly incidents in Iraq, defended its role on Tuesday, but lawmakers took aim at the company's actions in a Sept. 16 shooting in which 11 Iraqis were killed. REUTERS/Larry Downing (UNITED STATES)
Erik Prince, chairman of Frontier Services Group Ltd., poses for a photograph in Hong Kong, China, on Thursday, March 16, 2017. A former U.S. Navy SEAL, Prince is best known for his role running Blackwater Security. Photographer: Calvin Sit/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Erik Prince, chairman of Frontier Services Group Ltd., speaks during a Bloomberg Television interview in Hong Kong, China, on Thursday, March 16, 2017. A former U.S. Navy SEAL, Prince is best known for his role running Blackwater Security. Photographer: Justin Chin/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Erik Prince, former Navy Seal and founder of private military contractor Blackwater USA, arrives to testify during a closed-door House Select Intelligence Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, November 30, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
Erik Prince, chairman and executive director of Frontier Services Group Ltd., walks to a closed-door House Intelligence Committee meeting on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Nov. 30, 2017. Prince, best known for running the Blackwater private security firm whose employees were convicted of killing Iraqi citizens, was a presence during Donald Trump's presidential transition and worked in part with Michael Flynn. Photographer: Aaron P. Bernstein/Bloomberg via Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 30: Erik Prince, founder of Blackwater USA, arrives to appear before a closed door session of the House Intelligence Committee on Capitol Hill, November 30, 2017 in Washington, DC. The committee is investigating Russian interference in the 2016 Presidential election. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
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Prince, 49, traveled to the Seychelles last January and met with a Russian official with close ties to President Vladimir Putin. Prince has downplayed the nature of the sit-down, testifying before Congress in November that it was a random encounter “over a beer.”

But multiple reports have cast doubt over the veracity of Prince’s testimony.

U.S. and Arab officials told the Washington Post last April that the meeting, which took place nine days before Trump’s inauguration, was arranged to establish a covert communication channel between the incoming administration and the Kremlin.

While Prince had no formal role in the Trump campaign or transition, he reportedly presented himself to the meeting attendants as an unofficial envoy for the White House. Prince has vehemently denied those claims.

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