President Trump is again blaming his predecessor for Russia's annexation of Crimea

President Trump on Friday blamed his predecessor for Russia’s annexation of Crimea.

Trump insisted that former President Barack Obama was solely responsible for Russia taking the contested peninsula from Ukraine because Russian President Vladimir Putin did not "respect" Obama.

Puitn invaded and annexed the area in 2014. Obama and other world leaders condemned the move and placed heavy economic sanctions on Russia in response. The country was also booted from the elite Group of Eight of world leaders, making it the G7.

“President Obama lost Crimea because President Putin didn't respect President Obama,” Trump said Friday as he spoke to reporters outside the White House. “Didn't respect our country and didn't respect Ukraine. President Obama, not Trump -- when it's my fault, I'll tell you.”

Trump recently stunned American allies by proposing Russia be allowed to rejoin the G7.

RELATED: Putin Declares Crimea Independent

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SIMFEROPOL, UKRAINE - MARCH 17: Couples dance in Lenin Square on March 17, 2014 in Simferopol, Ukraine. Voters on the autonomous Ukrainian peninsular of Crimea voted overwhelmingly yesterday to secede from their country and join Russia. Crimea will seek to adopt the Russian Ruble as its official currency. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
People hold their Ukrainian national flags and a poster featuring Russian President Vladimir Putin and reading 'Stop Putin' as they demonstrate in front of the Russian Ambassy in Berlin on March 17, 2014. Crimea declared independence on March 17 and applied to join Russia while the Kremlin braced for sanctions after the flashpoint peninsula voted to leave Ukraine in a ballot that will likely fan the worst East-West tensions since the Cold War. AFP PHOTO / DPA / KAY NIETFELD +++ GERMANY OUT (Photo credit should read KAY NIETFELD/AFP/Getty Images)
SIMFEROPOL, UKRAINE - MARCH 17: In this photo illustration, Ukrainian historical figures are viewed on Ukrainian bank notes on March 17, 2014 in Simferopol, Ukraine. Voters on the autonomous Ukrainian peninsular of Crimea voted overwhelmingly yesterday to secede from their country and join Russia. Crimea will seek to adopt the Russian Ruble as its official currency. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
SIMFEROPOL, UKRAINE - MARCH 17: Couples dance in Lenin Square on March 17, 2014 in Simferopol, Ukraine. Voters on the autonomous Ukrainian peninsular of Crimea voted overwhelmingly yesterday to secede from their country and join Russia. Crimea will seek to adopt the Russian Ruble as its official currency. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
SIMFEROPOL, UKRAINE - MARCH 17: A woman walks by grafitti on a wall on March 17, 2014 in Simferopol, Ukraine. Voters on the autonomous Ukrainian peninsular of Crimea voted overwhelmingly yesterday to secede from their country and join Russia. Crimea will seek to adopt the Russian Ruble as its official currency. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
Armed men, believed to be Russian servicemen, patrol outside an Ukrainian military base in Perevalnoye on March 17, 2014. The United States and Europe aimed sanctions directly at Vladmir Putin's inner circle Monday to punish Russia's move to annex Crimea, deepening the worst East-West rift since the Cold War. The move came hours after the Ukrainian regime voted to join Russia in a referendum the West deems illegitimate and as Crimea embarked on the next political steps to embrace Kremlin rule. AFP PHOTO/ VASILY MAXIMOV (Photo credit should read VASILY MAXIMOV/AFP/Getty Images)
Armed men, believed to be Russian servicemen, patrol outside an Ukrainian military base in Perevalnoye on March 17, 2014. The United States and Europe aimed sanctions directly at Vladmir Putin's inner circle Monday to punish Russia's move to annex Crimea, deepening the worst East-West rift since the Cold War. The move came hours after the Ukrainian regime voted to join Russia in a referendum the West deems illegitimate and as Crimea embarked on the next political steps to embrace Kremlin rule. AFP PHOTO/ VASILY MAXIMOV (Photo credit should read VASILY MAXIMOV/AFP/Getty Images)
Cossacks, pro-Russian activists, march to take part in a rally outside the regional state administration building in Donetsk, eastern Ukraine, on March 17, 2014. The United States on March 17 imposed financial sanctions on seven top Russian government officials and lawmakers to punish Russia's incursion into Crimea. The list of officials who will see any property, assets and interests blocked in the United States includes Dmitry Rogozin, deputy prime minister, and several senior members of the Duma and advisors to President Vladimir Putin. AFP PHOTO / ALEXANDER KHUDOTEPLY (Photo credit should read Alexander KHUDOTEPLY/AFP/Getty Images)
A pro-Russian activist holds a flag during a rally as police forces stand guard in front of the regional state administration building in Donetsk, eastern Ukraine, on March 17, 2014. The United States on March 17 imposed financial sanctions on seven top Russian government officials and lawmakers to punish Russia's incursion into Crimea. The list of officials who will see any property, assets and interests blocked in the United States includes Dmitry Rogozin, deputy prime minister, and several senior members of the Duma and advisors to President Vladimir Putin. AFP PHOTO / ALEXANDER KHUDOTEPLY (Photo credit should read Alexander KHUDOTEPLY/AFP/Getty Images)
PEREVEVALNE, UKRAINE - MARCH 17: Armed soldiers without identifying insignia keep guard outside of a Ukrainian military base in the town of Perevevalne near the Crimean city of Simferopol on March 17, 2014 in Perevevalne, Ukraine. Voters on the autonomous Ukrainian peninsular of Crimea voted overwhelmingly yesterday to secede from their country and join Russia. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
Pro-Russian activists stage a rally as police forces stand guard in front of the regional state administration building in Donetsk, eastern Ukraine, on March 17, 2014. The United States on March 17 imposed financial sanctions on seven top Russian government officials and lawmakers to punish Russia's incursion into Crimea. The list of officials who will see any property, assets and interests blocked in the United States includes Dmitry Rogozin, deputy prime minister, and several senior members of the Duma and advisors to President Vladimir Putin. AFP PHOTO / ALEXANDER KHUDOTEPLY (Photo credit should read Alexander KHUDOTEPLY/AFP/Getty Images)
Pro-Russian activists stage a rally as police forces stand guard in front of the regional state administration building in Donetsk, eastern Ukraine, on March 17, 2014. The United States on March 17 imposed financial sanctions on seven top Russian government officials and lawmakers to punish Russia's incursion into Crimea. The list of officials who will see any property, assets and interests blocked in the United States includes Dmitry Rogozin, deputy prime minister, and several senior members of the Duma and advisors to President Vladimir Putin. AFP PHOTO / ALEXANDER KHUDOTEPLY (Photo credit should read Alexander KHUDOTEPLY/AFP/Getty Images)
Pro-Russian activists stage a rally as police forces stand guard in front of the regional state administration building in Donetsk, eastern Ukraine, on March 17, 2014. The United States on March 17 imposed financial sanctions on seven top Russian government officials and lawmakers to punish Russia's incursion into Crimea. The list of officials who will see any property, assets and interests blocked in the United States includes Dmitry Rogozin, deputy prime minister, and several senior members of the Duma and advisors to President Vladimir Putin. AFP PHOTO / ALEXANDER KHUDOTEPLY (Photo credit should read Alexander KHUDOTEPLY/AFP/Getty Images)
PEREVEVALNE, UKRAINE - MARCH 17: A man fixes the Crimean flag near groups of armed soldiers without identifying insignia who are keep guard outside of a Ukrainian military base in the town of Perevevalne near the Crimean city of Simferopol on March 17, 2014 in Perevevalne, Ukraine. Voters on the autonomous Ukrainian peninsular of Crimea voted overwhelmingly yesterday to secede from their country and join Russia. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
PEREVEVALNE, UKRAINE - MARCH 17: Armed soldiers without identifying insignia keep guard outside of a Ukrainian military base in the town of Perevevalne near the Crimean city of Simferopol on March 17, 2014 in Perevevalne, Ukraine. Voters on the autonomous Ukrainian peninsular of Crimea voted overwhelmingly yesterday to secede from their country and join Russia. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
PEREVEVALNE, UKRAINE - MARCH 17: Armed soldiers without identifying insignia keep guard outside of a Ukrainian military base in the town of Perevevalne near the Crimean city of Simferopol on March 17, 2014 in Perevevalne, Ukraine. Voters on the autonomous Ukrainian peninsular of Crimea voted overwhelmingly yesterday to secede from their country and join Russia. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
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“I think it’s better to have Russia in, than to have Russia out,” he reiterated on Friday.

According to recent reports, Trump questioned the reasoning behind Russia’s expulsion and defended Putin while meeting with world leaders last week in Canada.

Two diplomatic sources told BuzzFeed News that Trump told world leaders over dinner that Crimea was part of Russia because most of its population speaks the Russian language, adding that the president appeared to question why world leaders had sided with Ukraine over Russia.

"Ukraine is one of the most corrupt countries in the world," the President said, according to one source.

It’s far from the first time that Trump has offered an opinion on the contested peninsula that contrasted with most of America’s allies. During the 2016 campaign, Trump claimed the people of Crimea were happy to be taken over by Russian forces.

“You know the people of Crimea, from what I've heard, would rather be with Russia than where they were, and you have to look at that also," Trump said in an interview with ABC News in July 2016. "And frankly that part of the world is a mess, under Obama. With all the strength that you're talking about, and with all the power of NATO, and all of this, in the meantime [PUTIN] takes Crimea."

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