FBI official vowed to 'stop' Donald Trump from reaching White House — but bias didn't affect investigations, says DOJ watchdog


An FBI official assured his colleague they would “stop” Trump from making it to the White House in a 2016 text revealed Thursday in a report from the Justice Department’s ethics watchdog.

In an exchange sure to fire up President Trump’s supporters, an FBI investigator who worked on both the Clinton email case and the special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia probe, told agency lawyer Lisa Page that “we’ll stop it.”

“[Trump’s] not ever going to become president, right? Right?!” Page wrote to agent Peter Strzok.

“No. No he won’t. We’ll stop it,” Strzok responded.

The pair’s texts have become fodder for conservative conspiracy theories that the FBI was biased against President Trump during the election.

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However, DOJ Inspector General Michael Horowitz did not find that opinions the two shared with one another "directly affected the specific investigative actions we reviewed,” according to a report set to be released Thursday afternoon and obtained by Bloomberg.

“We did not find documentary or testimonial evidence that improper considerations, including political bias, directly affected the specific investigative actions we reviewed,” Horowitz's report conclusions reads, according to Bloomberg. “The conduct by these employees cast a cloud over the entire FBI investigation.”

Trump and others have has publicly attacked the pair. The President dubbed them “the incompetent & corrupt FBI lovers” in a tweet.

The President last month openly asked why Strzok was still employed at the FBI.

“Why is Peter S still there? What a total mess. Our Country has to get back to Business!” he tweeted.

Mueller removed Strzok from the Russia probe after earlier texts, which included criticisms of both Democrats and Republicans, became public and Page has since left the DOJ.

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