'That's going to cost a lot of money for the people of Canada': Trump continues war of words against Justin Trudeau

  • President Donald Trump added more fuel to the fight with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.
  • Trump said Trudeau's promise not to back down from US tariffs is "going to cost a lot of money for the people of Canada."
  • The back-and-forth between Trump and Trudeau highlights the growing tensions between the US and some the country's closest allies.

After a relatively amicable summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, US President Donald Trump again fanned the flames of his growing war of words with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

Trump once again went after Trudeau for what Trump considers unfair trading practices. He said Trudeau's promise to follow through with tariffs on US goods — a response to Trump's own tariffs on steel and aluminum imports from Canada, Mexico, and the European Union — would hurt the Canadian economy.

During an interview with ABC's George Stephanopoulos, Trump recounted seeing Trudeau's statement following the G7 summit in Quebec, Canada, during which the prime minister promised to fight back against the US's trade restrictions.

"I get into Air Force One, the television's on, and I see a news conference being given by the prime minister of Canada," Trump said. "And Justin. And I said, 'Oh that's nice, Justin’s giving a' — And then he talked about how they won't be bullied. And I said, 'What's this all about? He didn’t do that to my face, what’s this all about?'"

45 PHOTOS
Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau through the years
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Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau through the years

Justin Trudeau and bride Sophie Gregoire leave the Sainte-Madeleine D'Outremont Church, Montreal, after their wedding ceremony here, May 28, 2005. The car a 1959 Mercedez 300SL, was Pierre Trudeua's car and was recently renovated and given its original silver grey colour.

(Bernard Weil/Toronto Star via Getty Images)

With son Justin in her lap; Margaret Trudeau; wife of Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau; sits in a car outside the Inn on the Park just before a lunchtime visit to the home of friends. Star photographers Dick Loek had been waiting in the Don Mills hotel's lobby hoping the family might emerge. Mrs. Trudeau; with Justin in her arms; walked to her car accompanied by three security men. At the time; her husband was visiting an Etobicoke Ukrainian home for the elderly.

(Photo by Dick Loek/Toronto Star via Getty Images)

Justin steals the show. Margaret Trudeau; the Prime Minister's wife; and son Justin walk along the lake at Mont Tremblant. 

(Photo by Graham Bezant/Toronto Star via Getty Images)

Tracking the track stars. Drama of the pole-vaulting at Toronto Star Maple Leaf Indoor Games last night in Maple Leaf Gardens captured Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau and his wife; Margaret; but their 2-year-old son; Justin; was a little overwhelmed by it all. Although their two-day visit to Metro was on a crowded schedule; Trudeaus stayed 'at games for more than an hour. They had hoped to st for all events; but Justin tired and wouldn't sleep they left before halfway mark.

(Photo by Boris Spremo/Toronto Star via Getty Images)

Justin Trudeaus (R)

(Photo by Boris Spremo/Toronto Star via Getty Images)

Canadian Prime Minister Pierre E. Trudeau joins sons Justin, Sacha, and Michel in this photo for his 1980 Christmas card. Justin and Sacha will be nine and seven years, respectively on Christmas Day. Michel is five

(Bettmann via Getty Images)

Justin Trudeau pictured at age 14 in December, 1986.

(Boris Spremo/Toronto Star via Getty Images)

Justin Trudeau, the eldest son of former Canadian Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau, speaks about the loss of his brother Michel as he is accompanied by his mother Margaret, as they launch an awareness campaign with the Canadian Avalanche Foundation, January 14 on Mt. Seymour. As a result of the loss of Michel in an Avalanche accident in 1998, the Trudeau family is helping support avalanche safety awareness.

(Reuters Photographer / Reuters) 

Sacha(L) and Justin Trudeau(C) and former wife Margaret Kemper(R) of former Canadian Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau look over his casket in the Hall of Honor on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Canada 30 September, 2000. The former prime minister died 28 September after a a battle with prostate cancer.

(AARON HARRIS/AFP/Getty Images)

Justin Trudeau (L) and his brother Alexandre, sons of the late Canadian Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau, pose with a stamp honouring their father at it's unveiling in Montreal, July 3, 2001. Pierre Trudeau, one of Canada's most popular politicians, died in September 2000. 

(Shaun Best / Reuters)

Justin Trudeau speaks at the countdown to World Youth Day 2002at Nathan Philips Square. The international youth conference and papal visit to Canada from July 18-28, 2002 will be held at the old Downsview airport.

(Photo by Jim Ross/Toronto Star via Getty Images)

Justin Trudeau, on stage, during the tribute to Jean Chretien at the ACC.

(Rick Madonik/Toronto Star via Getty Images)

His Holiness the Dalai Lama of Tibet (R) greets Justin Trudeau, son of former Canadian Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau, at the Kalachakra Teachings at the Sky Dome in Toronto, April 25, 2004. His Holiness will confer the Kalachakra Initiation for World Peace, the largest Buddhist ritual and initiation regularly conferred by the Dalai Lama.

(REUTERS/Mike Cassese MC/HB)

Justin and Alexandre Trudeau stand by the plaque which offically renames Dorval Airport in honor of their late father former Prime Minister Pierre Elliot Trudeau in Montreal on September 9, 2003. The new name "The Montreal Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport" will be effective January 1, 2004.

(REUTERS/Christinne Muschi)

Justin Trudeau and bride Sophie Gregoire share a kiss as Margaret Trudeau looks on as they leave the Sainte-Madeleine D'Outremont Church, Montreal, after their wedding ceremony here, May 28, 2005.

(Bernard Weil/Toronto Star via Getty Images)

Justin Trudeau introduces Liberal leadership candidate Gerard Kennedy at the Liberal convention in Montreal, December 1, 2006.

(REUTERS/Shaun Best)

Liberal leadership candidate Gerard Kennedy and Justin Trudeau, son of former Canadian Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau, attend the Liberal convention in Montreal, November 29, 2006. The Liberal Party will elect a new leader later in the week.

(REUTERS/J.P. Moczulski)

Justin Trudeau, son of former Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau, talks to supporters after winning the Liberal nomination for the Montreal riding of Papineau April 29, 2007.

(REUTERS/Shaun Best)

Justin Trudeau, son of former Canadian Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau and candidate for the Liberal Party in Montreal, is seen during an interview in his campaign office on October 12, 2008 in Montreal, two days before the federal elections on October 14. One of three sons of Pierre Elliott Trudeau, prime minister of Canada from 1968 to 1979, and 1980 to 1984, Justin Trudeau swapped a teaching career for a chance to represent his father's Liberals in the Montreal electoral district of Papineau, and win it back from the separatists who took it in 2006.

(DAVID BOILY/AFP/Getty Images)

Mia Farrow and Justin Trudeau

(Colin McConnell/Toronto Star via Getty Images)

Liberal MP Justin Trudeau is pictured during an event to mark the end of 'Movember' on Parliament Hill in Ottawa November 30, 2010. A group of MPs and staff who grew moustaches during the month of November raised more than CDN $30,000 for prostate cancer research.

(REUTERS/Chris Wattie)

Canadian Liberal Leader Michael Ignatieff serves pancakes with Liberal MP Justin Trudeau as they attend a pancake breakfast in Frampton, July 21, 2010.

(REUTERS/Mathieu Belanger)

Lui Temkovski the Liberal candidate for Oak Ridges-Markham gets a visit from Justin Trudeau during his Liberal Party's auxiliary tour around the GTA today. They go mainstreeting in the town of Markham.

(Photo by David Cooper/Toronto Star via Getty Images)

Liberal Party leadership candidate Justin Trudeau speaks to supporters at a rally in Mississauga, October 4, 2012.

(REUTERS/Mike Cassese)

Liberal leadership candidate Justin Trudeau smiles during his speech at the Dashmesh Culture Senior Citizen Society in Calgary, Alberta, October 3, 2012. Calgary was his first stop after announcing he will seek the leadership of the Liberal party of Canada.

(REUTERS/Todd Korol)

Sophie Gregoire and Justin Trudeau arrive at the 'Midnight's Children' Premiere at the 2012 Toronto International Film Festival at Roy Thomson Hall on September 9, 2012 in Toronto, Canada.

(Photo by Jemal Countess/Getty Images)

Liberal Member of Parliament Justin Trudeau meets liberal supporters at a Stampede breakfast during the 100th anniversary of the Calgary Stampede in Calgary, Alberta, July 7, 2012.

(REUTERS/Todd Korol)

Justin Trudeau speaks as Leader of the Liberal Party of Canada, 2013

Liberal leader Justin Trudeau dumps a bucket of ice water onto Liberal MP Sean Casey for the ALS ice bucket challenge during a break in the Federal Liberal summer caucus meetings in Edmonton August 19, 2014.

(REUTERS/Dan Riedlhuber/File Photo)

French President Francois Hollande welcomes Canadian Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau prior to attending a meeting at the Elysee Presidential Palace on November 29, 2015 in Paris, France. France will host climate change conference COP21 in Paris from November 30 to December 11, 2015.

(Photo by Chesnot/Getty Images)

Canada's Prime Minister-designate Justin Trudeau arrives at a ceremony to commemorate the October 2014 attack on Parliament Hill, at the National War Memorial in Ottawa, Canada October 22, 2015. The event also honoured the lives of Warrant Officer Patrice Vincent and Corporal Nathan Cirillo, two soldiers killed in a pair of separate attacks police said were carried out independently by radical recent converts to Islam.

(REUTERS/Chris Wattie)

Canadian Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau waits with his son Xavier to cast his ballot in Montreal on October 19, 2015. The first of 65,000 polling stations opened Monday on Canada's Atlantic seaboard for legislative elections that pitted Prime Minister Stephen's Tories against liberal and social democratic parties. Up to 26.4 million electors are expected to vote in 338 electoral districts. Some 3.6 million already cast a ballot in advance voting a week ago, and the turnout Monday is expected to be high.

(NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)

The Leader of the Liberal Party of Canada, Justin Trudeau, visits Paul Brown Boxfit boxing gym for a photo opportunity on August 6, 2015 in Toronto.

(Carlos Osorio/Toronto Star via Getty Images)

Premier Kathleen Wynne joined Liberal Party of Canada leader Justin Trudeau for an election rally in Toronto Centre Monday night.

(Lucas Oleniuk/Toronto Star via Getty Images)

Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau waves to supporters as he arrives for the first federal leaders debate of the 2015 Canadian election campaign on August 6, 2015 in Toronto, Canada. The federal election is set for October 19, 2015.

(GEOFF ROBINS/AFP/Getty Images)

Canadian Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau and his wife Sophie wave on stage in Montreal on October 20, 2015 after winning the general elections.

(NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)

Liberal leader Justin Trudeau meets with the editorial board at the Toronto Star in Toronto.

(Todd Korol/Toronto Star via Getty Images)

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is greeted by British Prime Minister David Cameron prior to their meeting in Downing Street on November 25, 2015 in London, England.

(Photo by Tolga Akmen/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau poses with Quebec Premier Philippe Couillard and Montreal Mayor Denis Coderre as they visit the site of the Universite de Montreal's new Science Complex in Montreal, December 16, 2016.

(REUTERS/Christinne Muschi)

Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau talks with Prince George following the arrival of Britain's Prince William, Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, Prince George and Princess Charlotte at the Victoria International Airport for the start of their eight day royal tour to Canada in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, September 24, 2016.

(REUTERS/Chris Wattie)

Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau shakes hands with U.S. Vice President Joe Biden during a meeting in Trudeau's office on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, December 9, 2016.

(REUTERS/Chris Wattie)

Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau takes part in a news conference in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, December 12, 2016.

(REUTERS/Chris Wattie)

Prime Minister of Canada Justin Trudeau and US President Barack Obama exit the Hall of Honour on Parliament Hill following the North American Leaders Summit in Ottawa, June 28, 2016.

(CHRIS ROUSSAKIS/AFP/Getty Images)

(L-R) Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Prince William the Duke of Cambridge, Sophie Gregoire Trudeau, and Catherine the Duchess of Cambridge take a walk at the Kitsilano Coast Guard station, in Vancouver, British Columbia on September 25, 2016.

(JONATHAN HAYWARD/AFP/Getty Images)

Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks during a meeting with representatives of the Congress of Aboriginal Peoples on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, January 10, 2017.

(REUTERS/Chris Wattie)

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While Trump expressed surprise at Trudeau's remarks, his comments were largely in line with what Canadian officials had said since Trump's announcement of tariffs.

"I have made it very clear to the president that it is not something we relish doing, but it is something that we absolutely will do, because Canadians, we’re polite, we’re reasonable, but we also will not be pushed around," Trudeau said.

Immediately after his remarks Saturday, Trump blasted Trudeau's statement as "dishonest & weak" on Twitter and announced the US would not be signing the joint G7 communique — a symbolic but unprecedented move.

'That's going to cost a lot of money for the people of Canada'

Trump addressed the fight with Trudeau during a press conference following the North Korea summit, suggesting average Canadians will pay the price.

"That's going to cost a lot of money for the people of Canada," Trump said. "He learned. You can't do that. You can't do that."

Economists generally view tariffs as inflationary, forcing consumer prices higher and eventually hurting the economy of the country that impose the tariffs. For instance, Trump's steel and aluminum tariffs are expected to cause a drag on US economic growth and result in a net loss of American jobs.

18 PHOTOS
Impact of Trump's proposed steel and aluminum tariffs
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Impact of Trump's proposed steel and aluminum tariffs
NEW YORK, NY - MARCH 1: A trader is comforted by a coworker as they work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) on March 1, 2018 in New York City. Major stock indexes plunged Thursday afternoon following President Trump's announcement that he was imposing a 25 percent tariff on imported steel and 10 percent on aluminum. Investor concern about the news rattled the Dow Jones industrial average, which closed down more than 400 points. (Photo by Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO, CA - MARCH 02: Wine in aluminum cans is displayed on a shelf at Ales Unlimited on March 2, 2018 in San Francisco, California. Beverage companies that use aluminum for canned drinks are concerned that tariffs proposed by US President Donald Trump could result in higher prices for consumers and job cuts across the industry. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
U.S. President Donald Trump announces that the United States will impose tariffs of 25 percent on steel imports and 10 percent on imported aluminum during a meeting at the White House in Washington, U.S., March 1, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Members of trade unions hold a protest against US President Donal Trump's import surcharge on Brazilian steel and in defense of their employment, outside the US Consulate in Sao Paulo, Brazil, on March 5, 2018. Since announcing last week plans to impose a 25 percent tariff on steel imports and 10 percent on aluminium, Trump has shrugged off threats from many nations, including China, Canada, Brazil and Mexico among others. / AFP PHOTO / Miguel SCHINCARIOL (Photo credit should read MIGUEL SCHINCARIOL/AFP/Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO, CA - MARCH 02: Beer in aluminum cans is displayed on a shelf at Ales Unlimited on March 2, 2018 in San Francisco, California. Beverage companies that use aluminum for canned drinks are concerned that tariffs proposed by US President Donald Trump could result in higher prices for consumers and job cuts across the industry. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
White House Chief of Staff John Kelly and press secretary Sarah Sanders listen as U.S. President Donald Trump announces that the United States will impose tariffs of 25 percent on steel imports and 10 percent on imported aluminum during a meeting at the White House in Washington, U.S., March 1, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
NEW YORK, NY - MARCH 1: Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) on March 1, 2018 in New York City. Major stock indexes plunged Thursday afternoon following President Trump's announcement that he was imposing a 25 percent tariff on imported steel and 10 percent on aluminum. Investor concern about the news rattled the Dow Jones industrial average, which closed down more than 400 points. (Photo by Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/Getty Images)
Members of trade unions hold a protest against US President Donal Trump's import surcharge on Brazilian steel and in defense of their employment, outside the US Consulate in Sao Paulo, Brazil, on March 5, 2018. Since announcing last week plans to impose a 25 percent tariff on steel imports and 10 percent on aluminium, Trump has shrugged off threats from many nations, including China, Canada, Brazil and Mexico among others. / AFP PHOTO / Miguel SCHINCARIOL (Photo credit should read MIGUEL SCHINCARIOL/AFP/Getty Images)
Chairman, CEO and president of Nucor John Ferriola and U.S. Steel CEO Dave Burritt flank U.S. President Donald Trump as he announces that the United States will impose tariffs of 25 percent on steel imports and 10 percent on imported aluminum during a meeting at the White House in Washington, U.S., March 1, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
NEW YORK, NY - MARCH 1: A trader works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) on March 1, 2018 in New York City. Major stock indexes plunged Thursday afternoon following President Trump's announcement that he was imposing a 25 percent tariff on imported steel and 10 percent on aluminum. Investor concern about the news rattled the Dow Jones industrial average, which closed down more than 400 points. (Photo by Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO, CA - MARCH 02: Wine in aluminum cans is displayed on a shelf at Ales Unlimited on March 2, 2018 in San Francisco, California. Beverage companies that use aluminum for canned drinks are concerned that tariffs proposed by US President Donald Trump could result in higher prices for consumers and job cuts across the industry. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - MARCH 1: Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) on March 1, 2018 in New York City. Major stock indexes plunged Thursday afternoon following President Trump's announcement that he was imposing a 25 percent tariff on imported steel and 10 percent on aluminum. Investor concern about the news rattled the Dow Jones industrial average, which closed down more than 400 points. (Photo by Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/Getty Images)
Pacific Coast Producers president and CEO Dan Vincent stands in his cooperative's distribution center in Lodi, California, U.S., April 27, 2018. Picture taken April 27, 2018. To match Insight USA-TRUMP/TARIFFS-CANS REUTERS/Noah Berger
An employee uses a crane as he prepares to move a steel pipe at the SAW Pipe Mills, operated by Liberty Commodities Ltd., in Hartlepool, U.K., on Thursday, June 14, 2018. Steel and aluminum�tariffs�imposed by the U.S. in March may already be filtering through to prices charged by American producers of the metals. Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg via Getty Images
An employee passes a stack of steel pipes at the SAW Pipe Mills, operated by Liberty Commodities Ltd., in Hartlepool, U.K., on Thursday, June 14, 2018. Steel and aluminum�tariffs�imposed by the U.S. in March may already be filtering through to prices charged by American producers of the metals. Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A steel pipe enters a cleaning machine at the SAW Pipe Mills, operated by Liberty Commodities Ltd., in Hartlepool, U.K., on Thursday, June 14, 2018. Steel and aluminum�tariffs�imposed by the U.S. in March may already be filtering through to prices charged by American producers of the metals. Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Identification stencils hang above steel pipes at the SAW Pipe Mills, operated by Liberty Commodities Ltd., in Hartlepool, U.K., on Thursday, June 14, 2018. Steel and aluminum�tariffs�imposed by the U.S. in March may already be filtering through to prices charged by American producers of the metals. Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Sheet steel sits stacked in the store room at the SAW Pipe Mills, operated by Liberty Commodities Ltd., in Hartlepool, U.K., on Thursday, June 14, 2018. Steel and aluminum�tariffs�imposed by the U.S. in March may already be filtering through to prices charged by American producers of the metals. Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg via Getty Images
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The Trump-Trudeau scuffle represents a pivot away from the once-friendly relationship between the two leaders. But despite the war of words, Trump insisted at the press conference in Singapore that the pair still "have a good relationship."

Trudeau is not Trump's only target in the growing trade war with the other members of the G7, which is made up of Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, and the UK. Trump aired grievances with each of the G7 members during the summit. Trump reportedly pointed to specific trade deficits, particularly in the trade of goods, as evidence that the other leaders were taking advantage of the US.

Trump again presented the US as the victim of unfair trade deals during the interview with ABC on Tuesday.

"But here’s what the story is: We have been taken advantage of as a country for decades by friends and enemies both," Trump said. "We have been, our trade is a disaster, our trade deals."

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