Teen vandalizes Colorado National Monument with 'promposal'


A Colorado teenager could go to jail for spray painting a ‘promposal’ on the Colorado National Monument.

The hopeless romantic — whose identity remains a mystery — used black spray paint to write “PROM...ISE? onto ancient rock’s surface.

Graffiti that reads “You’re perfect to me,” and “I promise to love you forever + always” was also found in a secluded area of the monument near Grand Junction, Co.

The vandalism is punishable by up to six years in prison and a $5,000 fine, park ranger Frank Hayde told the Daily News.

Authorities have yet to identify the architect of defacement.

“With this type of graffiti when there are no identifying markers like initials or nicknames we don’t have a log to go on,” Hayde said.


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Teen vandalizes Colorado National Monument
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Teen vandalizes Colorado National Monument
A Colorado teenager could go to jail for spray painting a ‘promposal’ on the Colorado National Monument.
The suspect spray-painted the monument with “You’re perfect to me,” and “I promise to love you forever + always."
The suspect spray-painted the monument with “You’re perfect to me,” and “I promise to love you forever + always."
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Still, he’s hoping for a confession and urged the crime’s perpetrator to turn themselves in.

“If they do come forward we will certainly be a lot more lenient with the punishment. But if we have to keep investigating this and put time and resources into it and have to offer a reward and pay out a reward for a tip, we are not going to be more lenient,” Hayde said.

The writing was discovered near a site that contains ancient rock art, including prehistoric rock carvings, called petroglyphs, and paintings, called pictographs.

Hayde said the artwork doesn’t appear to have been damaged.

“These are cultural resources so there is a chance for them to be impacted when people do graffiti in this area,” he said.

Removing graffiti from the national monument can be challenging, according to Hayde.

“We are very meticulous about it because we have to be careful not to harm any petroglyphs that could be lurking underneath,” he said. “We are also concerned about minimizing the impact to the rock surface.”

Hayde offered some advice to the young suitor.

“What better way to impress your date than to prove that you are willing to take responsibility for your actions and own up to your mistakes?” he said.

He urged whoever was responsible to call the National Monument and admit to the crime, reiterating that it would be dealt with “in a fair and reasonable manner.”

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