Trump said he wants to invite Kim Jong Un to the US if the talks in Singapore go well

 

  • President Donald Trump on Thursday said he would "certainly" invite North Korean leader Kim Jong Un to the US if the upcoming talks in Singapore go well. 
  • Trump is set to meet with Kim at the Capella Hotel in Singapore on June 12.
  • The president has emphasized that the meeting is the first step in a "process" in which the US hopes to get North Korea to agree to full denuclearization.

President Donald Trump on Thursday said he would "certainly" invite North Korean leader Kim Jong Un to the US if the upcoming talks in Singapore go well. 

Trump also said he hopes to normalize relations with North Korea and that it's "absolutely" possible an agreement could be signed to formally end the Korean War, which has technically been ongoing since the fighting stopped via an armistice in 1953.

"Normalizing relations is something that I would expect to do...There are a lot of good factors lined up for North Korea. ... It has tremendous potential because the people are great, and we would certainly like to see normalization," Trump said as he held a joint press conference with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. 

Donald Trump and Shinzo Abe meet at the White House

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Donald Trump and Shinzo Abe meet at the White House
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Donald Trump and Shinzo Abe meet at the White House
U.S. President Donald Trump arrives for a joint news conference with Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, U.S., June 7, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe holds a joint news conference with U.S. President Donald Trump in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, U.S., June 7, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
White House senior adviser Ivanka Trump listens to the translation during a joint news conference between U.S. President Donald Trump and Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, U.S., June 7, 2018. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
U.S. President Donald Trump holds a joint news conference with Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, U.S., June 7, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and U.S. President Donald Trump hold a joint news conference in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, U.S., June 7, 2018. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
U.S. President Donald Trump departs a joint news conference with Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, U.S., June 7, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo awaits the start of a joint news conference by President Donald Trump and Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe as he stands in the colonnade near the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, U.S., June 7, 2018. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
White House senior adviser Ivanka Trump is greeted by U.S. Ambassador to Japan Bill Hagerty prior to a joint news conference between U.S. President Donald Trump and Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, U.S., June 7, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Donald Trump listens while meeting with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, U.S., June 7, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
White House senior adviser Ivanka Trump listens to the translation during a joint news conference between U.S. President Donald Trump and Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, U.S., June 7, 2018. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and U.S. President Donald Trump hold a joint news conference in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, U.S., June 7, 2018. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
White House senior adviser Ivanka Trump arrives prior to a joint news conference between U.S. President Donald Trump an Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, U.S., June 7, 2018. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 07: White House Senior Advisor and daughter of President Donald Trump, Ivanka Trump (C) attends a news conference with her father and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in the Rose Garden at the White House June 7, 2018 in Washington, DC. Trump and Abe discussed the upcoming U.S.-North Korea summit. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 07: Secretary of State Mike Pompeo (L) talks with White House National Security Advisor John Bolton before a news conference with U.S. President Donald Trump and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, in the Rose Garden at the White House, on June 7, 2018 in Washington, DC. The two leaders met to discuss next week's summit with North Korea. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
Mike Pompeo, U.S. secretary of state, from left, John Bolton, national security advisor, and Sarah Huckabee Sanders, White House press secretary, attend a news conference with U.S. President Donald Trump and Shinzo Abe, Japan's prime minister, not pictured, in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, June 7, 2018. Abe has plenty to worry about ahead of Trump's meeting with Kim Jong Un next week, including the prospect of a deal that undermines Japan's six-decade security alliance with the U.S. and leaves the island nation vulnerable to attack. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Peter Navarro, director of the National Trade Council, attends a news conference with U.S. President Donald Trump and Shinzo Abe, Japan's prime minister, not pictured, in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, June 7, 2018. Abe has plenty to worry about ahead of Trump's meeting with Kim Jong Un next week, including the prospect of a deal that undermines Japan's six-decade security alliance with the U.S. and leaves the island nation vulnerable to attack. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 07: (L-R) U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and White House Deputy Press Secretaries Hogan Gidley and Lindsay Walters talk before the start of a joint news conference with President Donald Trump and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in the Rose Garden at the White House June 7, 2018 in Washington, DC. Trump and Abe discussed the upcoming U.S.-North Korea summit. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
U.S. President Donald Trump, left, and Shinzo Abe, Japan's prime minister, hold a joint news conference in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S, on Thursday, June 7, 2018. Abe has plenty to worry about ahead of Trump's meeting with Kim Jong Un next week, including the prospect of a deal that undermines Japans six-decade security alliance with the U.S. and leaves the island nation vulnerable to attack. Photographer: Yuri Gripas/Pool via Bloomberg
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 07: (L-R) White House National Security Advisor John Bolton, U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Vice President Mike Pence talk before the start of a joint news conference with President Donald Trump and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in the Rose Garden at the White House June 7, 2018 in Washington, DC. Trump and Abe discussed the upcoming U.S.-North Korea summit. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
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Trump is set to meet with Kim at the Capella Hotel in Singapore on June 12. Many of the details surrounding the highly anticipated summit remain hazy, and the White House has sought to temper expectations of what might occur. 

The president has emphasized that the meeting is the first step in a "process" in which the US hopes to get North Korea to agree to full denuclearization.

In recent weeks, it was unclear if the summit would even occur amid back and forth between the US and North Korea. Trump canceled the meeting in late May, only to announce it was back on last week after continued dialogue with Pyongyang. 

If Trump does indeed invite Kim to the US, it would undoubtedly draw a significant level of domestic criticism given the long history of animosity between Washington and Pyongyang as well as the rampant human rights abuses in North Korea. 

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