Trump administration readies to release plans for reorganizing government

The Trump administration is reportedly readying to release its plan for federal government reorganization. 

Politico reports, citing sources, the proposal includes sweeping changes to the structure of public assistance programs. 

Proposed plans include moving a number of them to the Health and Human Services Department, including the USDA’s Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, known to some as food stamps. 

“You have low-income assistance in a bunch of different shops without one point of oversight and without a whole lot of communication. Why not have one federal agency responsible for execution?” one of the sources told Politico. 

US Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar

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US Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar
U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar speaks during the daily briefing at the White House in Washington, U.S., May 11, 2018. REUTERS/Leah Millis
U.S. President Donald Trump stands with Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar as they participate in the White House Sports and Fitness Day event on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, U.S., May 30, 2018. REUTERS/Leah Millis
U.S. President Donald Trump enters the Rose Garden with Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar to speak about lowering drug prices at the White House in Washington, U.S., May 11, 2018. REUTERS/Leah Millis
U.S. President Donald Trump listens to Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar speak about lowering drug prices from the Rose Garden at the White House in Washington, U.S., May 11, 2018. REUTERS/Leah Millis
White House counselor Kellyanne Conway, sitting with Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS) Alex Azar, reacts with a wink and a thumbs-up to a compliment from U.S. President Donald Trump during a youth forum titled Generation Next, at the White House in Washington, U.S. March 22, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar participates in a forum called Generation Next at the Eisenhower Executive Office Building in Washington, U.S., March 22, 2018. REUTERS/Leah Millis
Alex Azar II prepares to testify before the Senate Finance Committee on his nomination to be Health and Human Services secretary in Washington, U.S., January 9, 2018. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
Alex Azar II testifies before the Senate Finance Committee on his nomination to be Health and Human Services secretary in Washington, U.S., January 9, 2018. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
Alex Azar testifies during a Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee hearing on his nomination to be Health and Human Services secretary on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., November 29, 2017. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
US President Donald Trump arrives with Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Azar outside the White House on the South Lawn before he delivers remarks and participates in the White House Sports and Fitness Day on May 30, 2018 in Washington,DC. (Photo by Nicholas Kamm / AFP) (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
US President Donald Trump (C), flanked by Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Azar(C-L)as people participate in the White House Sports and Fitness Day on May 30, 2018 in Washington,DC. (Photo by Nicholas Kamm / AFP) (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
Alex Azar, secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS), right, speaks as U.S. President Donald Trump listens during an event on lowering drug prices in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Friday, May 11, 2018. Trump is proposing a sweeping effort to bring down U.S. drug prices in a long-awaited plan meant to fulfill a promise he has been pushing since his bid for the White House. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Alex Azar, secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS), speaks during a press briefing at the White House after an event on lowering drug prices with U.S. President Donald Trump, not pictured, in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Friday, May 11, 2018. Trump is proposing a sweeping effort to bring down U.S. drug prices in a long-awaited plan meant to fulfill a promise he has been pushing since his bid for the White House. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 11: HHS Secretary Alex M. Azar (C), speaks during the unveiling of 'Prescribed to Death' a Memorial to the victims of the opioid crisis, temporally located on the Ellipse at President� Park, on April 11, 2018 in Washington, DC. The memorial consists of a wall of 22,000 engraved white pills �each representing the face of someone lost to a prescription opioid overdose in 2015. Also pictured is Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, and White House Counselor�ellyanne Conway. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 11: Deborah Hersman, (C), CEO of the National Safety Council, speaks during the unveiling of 'Prescribed to Death' a Memorial to the victims of the opioid crisis, temporally located on the Ellipse at President� Park, on April 11, 2018 in Washington, DC. The memorial consists of a wall of 22,000 engraved white pills �each representing the face of someone lost to a prescription opioid overdose in 2015. Also pictured is HHS Secretary Alex�. Azar (L), and White House Counselor�ellyanne Conway. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
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There is also reportedly a desire to change the name of HHS, preferably to something that includes the word “welfare.” 

The Hill points out, “The reorganization could face tough odds of coming into fruition, given it would likely require congressional approval.” 

Trump has long talked about welfare reform and as PBS notes, he “wants to put his stamp on the welfare system, apparently in favor of a more restrictive policy.”

Back in April, the president signed an executive order “directing federal agencies to strengthen the work requirements for various welfare programs,” reports NPR.

“The administration argues that despite low unemployment…enrollment in various government assistance programs remains high, years into the economic recovery,” NPR added.

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